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JamesR

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About JamesR

  • Rank
    Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    NY

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Quivers,sheaths,belts,armguards.
  • Interested in learning about
    Handstitching,design and layout
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    google

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  1. I think it was about $5 per fastener.
  2. I bought mine from ( https://www.sailrite.com. You can also get them from Weaver leather.
  3. New black bridle leather briefcase using Loxx fasteners. They attach easily by punching a 3/8" hole and screwing them together. They are reliable and strong. I really like them. Anyone try them yet, what do you think?
  4. This is my new jig for cutting and squaring off pieces. It was made of plywood and aluminum extrusions. The cutting end was part of a mat cutting device. I removed the grey blade holder and mounted it on block of polyethylene material. The block was routed to fit tightly in the aluminum extrusion so it slides smoothly with no side play. The extrusion can be tightened down to hold the piece in place while cutting. The fixed top piece is at 90 degrees to the piece that holds down the leather which gives me square corners. The mat cutting blades are quite sharp and give clean cuts. There is a groove beneath the blade so it clears the plywood surface with no drag.
  5. Thank you for all the replies. I get the idea that the glue not only holds the work but keeps the edges locked together for a no gap edge finish?
  6. What do you think of the double sided tape for leather instead of glue? I am wondering what the edges look like without the glue?
  7. GeneH Not sure if I follow about the curved vs straight block. I like the idea though of a movable block with a recess (rabbet)on the lower edge to keep the stitch line uniformly spaced from the edge.
  8. Rockoboy, Yes, I like that idea.
  9. Neilmott, Miss Denise You are welcome.
  10. Also, because the aluminum is 1/8" and the saw kerf is also 1/8" it is a very snug fit. The poly does not slide around at all, it really stay put.
  11. HeatherAthebyne, The poly does press down and holds the work quite well. Although the chisels do get stuck sometimes. Scoutmom103, You are welcome.
  12. Thank you all for the kind words. Scoutmom103 I used a piece of plywood and screwed an aluminum angle to the bottom of one side. The aluminum angle is 1/8" thick metal with 1 1/2" legs. One of the legs sticks up to form a stop for the leather. I then used a piece of UHMW poly board. (Similar to cutting board material which could also be used) I cut two grooves (1/8" saw kerfs). The grooves provide the spacing from the edge of the leather for the stitch line. I used two different spacing for thin or thicker leather. The poly board provides an edge for the iron to press up against when using the iron. I use a 10 OZ leather backing piece under my work which can be changed as required. The metal angle is 1/8" thick which is also the thickness of most table saw blades. This makes cutting the grooves easy. Here is a better photo of the bottom showing the support blocks. I hope this helps.
  13. Made this jig to aid in using my Crimson Hides pricking irons. It is a plywood platform with an aluminum angle edge. I use the edge as a stop for my leather pieces to be worked on. It has a thick leather backing piece which the workpiece rests on. It also has a Poly guide strip which fits over the aluminum stop and presses down on the leather piece. The guide strip is grooved for two different stitch spacings to the edge of the work. With the work against the stop, the guide piece presses down on the work and provides an edge to align my iron vertically. The guide also keeps the stitch holes evenly spaced along the edge of leather. I can punch the grain side of one piece and then the flesh side of it's mating piece and my edges stay very closely aligned. This also keeps the angle of the holes parallel to each other which is not possible when the holes are punched from the grain side on both. If the leather is not too thick I can also punch through both pieces at the same time. This jig keeps long stitchlines quite straight. Also these Crimson Hide irons are very fine tools.
  14. terrymac, Not sure what you mean, are you saying they will separate on a belt or wallet even if you do glue them? Thanks
  15. Koreric75, Yes I am about to do just that and see how it comes out. Rockoboy, I see your point with not pulling too tight. I'm guessing that no matter how tight the edges are drawn together by the stitching eventually a gap will form.
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