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ScottEnglish

Thonging chisel for stitching

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Hi.

I am considering buying a C. S. Osborne one-prong thonging chisel for making stitching holes. The chisel is available in a width of 3/32". Or 2.4mm if you prefer. Has anyone tried this?

Thanks.

Scott

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Chisels make easy work to make holes in leather.  A single prong does just that ...1 hole at a time.  If you can afford to add a 2 and a 4 prong, it will help you keep your line a little straighter and your hole spacing much more consistent.  I use all three.  4 prong for long straight sections, 2 prong for bends and round edges, and the 1 punch when I have a gap between 2 holes that is just too wide to leave without a hole. 

1 hour ago, ScottEnglish said:

I am considering buying a C. S. Osborne one-prong thonging chisel for making stitching holes. The chisel is available in a width of 3/32". Or 2.4mm if you prefer. Has anyone tried this?

Someone just recently shared this link.  It may be helpful.

 

Edited by PastorBob

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A THONGING chisel will make holes that are far too large. A thonging chisel and a stitching chisel are two different critters. 

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Thanks PastorBob.

tsunkasapa: At 3/32" wide at the prong the hole will be small. My 2 1/4" saddler's awl makes a larger hole. Am I mistaken?

 

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I don't know what awl you have, but none of mine make a hole that size. 3/32 is a HUGE hole.

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10 hours ago, ScottEnglish said:

Thanks PastorBob.

tsunkasapa: At 3/32" wide at the prong the hole will be small. My 2 1/4" saddler's awl makes a larger hole. Am I mistaken?

 

you need a stitching chisel or pricking chisel for use with sewing awls. believe Tsunkasapa. Also consider this, using a one prong stitching chisel wont be any different than just using an awl in the first place except it will take you twice as long.

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A stitching chisel will make a diamond shaped hole, about 2mm across the points of the rhombus, it will be 1mm or less wide.

A lacing chisel will make a 2.5 / 3mm rectangular hole about 2 to 2.5 mm wide. The wider hole is necessary to pull the lace, typically nominally 1mm thick but closer to 1.5 mm thick.

It will take very thick thread to fill that hole neatly whereas 0.5mm thread (x2 in s/s) will fill the stitching hole

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Y’all should post close up pictures of these items, I only have stitching chisels also do not use what Tandy has, Tandy employees will tell you that it’s only for marking the holes

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15 minutes ago, Doc Reaper said:

Y’all should post close up pictures of these items, I only have stitching chisels also do not use what Tandy has, Tandy employees will tell you that it’s only for marking the holes

lacing chisel left stitching chisel right. both from Tandy and both work as well as any.

lacing1.JPG

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6 minutes ago, chuck123wapati said:

lacing chisel left stitching chisel right. both from Tandy and both work as well as any.

lacing1.JPG

Lately Tandy has put warnings with their chisels that they are not for punching holes, I believe that you can read it on their web pages. There has been tongs breaking off

Edited by Doc Reaper
Add on

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Just now, Doc Reaper said:

Lately Tandy has put warnings with their chisels that they are not for punching holes, I believe that you can read it on their web pages

Interesting i haven't noticed that but maybe they are trying to explain that they are not hole punches, chisels aren't for punching holes they are for cutting slots. hole punches are round and for punching holes. lol  Most of what we do on the forum is answer questions about tools that the tool companies don't . in our high tech world there has been a real disconnect with modern man and his understanding of hand tools.

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From what I learned in this topic I decided to buy two Japanese stitching awls by Kyoshin Elle. Thanks to everyone for your contributions.

Scott

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Tandy’s website does not say anything about not using their stitching chisels to punch through leather, not that I could find.  In fact, just the opposite.

I have two sets of their Craftool Pro Diamond chisels and use them regularly.  They look brand new.  The black ones they sell will bend if you abuse them, striking them off-center for example.  Even still, they last for years.

9B7F9169-AE04-49D2-AA06-C725EF14DA7B.png

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