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Tugadude

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About Tugadude

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    Leatherworker.net Regular

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    St. Louis, MO
  • Interests
    Leathercraft, vintage bicycles and my family.

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Hobbyist
  • Interested in learning about
    To improve my skills and respect the craft
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    Surfing for examples of leatherwork

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  1. I feel your pain. I have issues keeping both snaps and rivets straight when hammering them into place. As a hobbyist it is hard to justify a machine when you don't use it very often. One thing I found works with small rivets is to use pliers instead of the anvil and setting tool. I have a smooth plier, no knurling for grip that works very well. I just squeeze and it gets the job done so much easier than with the anvil. And, as a bonus, it also works in confined spaces where using the anvil is impossible. I did look on both Amazon and Aliexpress and you can find setting machines in both places for less than $100.00. As is usual the reviews are all over the place. Good luck in your search. You aren't the only one dissatisfied with the process.
  2. I really like the appearance of the border. I really don't do much stamping and no tooling to speak of but I do want to try a border stamp on a project in the future and that one is quite attractive. I can see that enhancing a lot of projects, especially binders. Every time I see a well-executed project like this it reminds me of how cool this hobby is. And if this isn't your hobby, then I hope you are repaid for all of the time and experience that goes into creating something so special.
  3. That sheath is a cut above most I've seen. Well done!
  4. Thanks for that! And thanks for not getting defensive! We're all trying to learn here and I have much to learn from the rest of you.
  5. Where did you see this? Personally, I would tend to doubt that it "waterproofs" at all. Waterproofing tends to be either an impenetrable coating such as a sealer or an integral treatment such as oil, wax, etc.
  6. I'd try reputable watch dealers to see what they might offer. They generally sell replacement bars and the QR bars are becoming popular for obvious reasons. However, my opinion as a "watch guy" is that these bars could be problematic in some applications. I don't know that I'd trust them on a heavy diver, for example. The fact they are easier to remove translates into just that, easier to disengage in my opinion. I'm probably being overly cautious, but with the cost of these pins versus the watches they serve demands it in my opinion. I do have straps with these sort of pins and no I haven't had issues. But the potential is there. I did notice some vendors offering "premium" bars of that type. You might contact them. Here's one example: https://www.basandlokes.com/quick-release-premium-1-8mm-spring-bars/ I haven't done any business with them, just using them as an example. Here's one in the U.K., but it appears their sizes are severely limited at the moment. But they are said to be "thicker" than standard bars, making them more secure for diving watches. https://www.zuludiver.com/products/quick-release-divers-spring-bars Again, I'm probably being overly cautious, but as a watch fan I do have concerns about longterm use of these pins. Hope you have good luck with them!
  7. I wouldn’t count on it to function the way a resist does.
  8. The main thing I noticed is that the inner and outer pieces are the exact same length from what I can tell. That isn't ever going to work if you wish to fold it. And obviously you do. The outer shell in my opinion, and this varies according to thickness of leather, needs to be at least 3/8" to 1/2" longer than the inner piece. So in mm, about 9.5mm to 13mm or thereabouts. You seem to be very cautious and wanting to draw a perfect template. Nothing wrong with that but don't let it become paralysis by analysis. I'm one of those who is pretty lucky in that I can look at something and pretty much recreate it without resorting to detailed templates such as yours. Not everyone can do that I realize. But my advice is to buy some cheap "practice leather" and just begin creating. You might be surprised how simple it can be. And still get great results. I have bought sides from Springfield Leather Co. from their discount table that have been perfect for this. I think on their website they call them $35.00 sides or something like that. They used to be even cheaper. But you get an entire side of usable leather that is good enough for actual projects and definitely good enough for practice. Some that I've gotten was extremely impressive but they were one-offs I guess and they just wanted to move them. I'm sure a leather company in your area might have similar hides. Good luck and have fun!
  9. I had the chemistry set as a kid and somehow I survived it. What is missing these days is some good old common sense. Anything can be dangerous in the wrong hands. Even pure water can kill people if they drink too much and unfortunately it does happen. I umpire little league and one of my fellow umps nearly died one extremely hot afternoon because all he did was drink water and his electrolytes got out of whack. He was out (unconscious) for several minutes, scaring the crap out of everyone there. Thank God the EMTs were able to get an IV into him and get him going pretty quickly. There is always risk when using chemicals. Some are safer than others but each and every one has its recommended precautions and handling requirements. All can be found by looking up the product's SDS, Safety Data Sheet, which used to be called MSDS, Material Safety Data Sheet. Don't know why it changed, but it did. I use them regularly in my business of construction chemicals. They literally can be a lifesaver.
  10. Visiting there is always a treat! Staff is always friendly and helpful. And way more there than you can find online.
  11. Who knows? I don’t mean to be a smart aleck but you haven’t identified a specific kit. Some probably feature decent thread while I’m sure others don’t. My suggestion is to check out Springfield Leather and their Rhino Thread. Nice-sized spools for cheap and it is decent quality woven polyester thread. You also need to decide what size thread is suitable for what you need it for. what sort of project or projects will you be working on?
  12. Seems a punch would be much easier but with my limited tools I would punch round holes at each end and then connect them with two straight cuts. Scalpel or X-acto Knife for the straight work.
  13. I have heard horror stories both from folks who tried to clean leather coats at home and through professionals. So proceed with caution I guess. Personally I would seek out an established garment cleaner who says they specialize in leather. But I would still check their feedback, which is usually able to be done through online reviews. Good luck, they only have one chance to do it right. Edit: just occurred to me maybe a fire restoration company might be worth asking.
  14. Tugadude

    I made a thing

    Nice! I’ve heard of box stitch but that looks like a tornado stitch!
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