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Nice! Did you make this for someone to use, or is it a show piece? I had a work colleague, who was a novice horse rider, rave about the McLellan saddle he rode on a pack trip.  I wondered if he correctly identified the saddle because I've never seen them in use for any regular horse sport.  I've never used one, but wonder how comfortable they are.  --John

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Comfort and Army go together with Military Intelligence

Edited by chrisash

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I knew a few old quartermasters who assured me that the McLellan was primarily designed to be horse friendly not rider friendly but over time, improvements were made with the trooper in mind. The model in the pictured is the 1917, one of the most advanced but I never knew an old cavalry Sargent who wasn't one tough booger. Endurance saddles are much like them? 

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Very nice!

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4 hours ago, Squilchuck said:

Nice! Did you make this for someone to use, or is it a show piece? I had a work colleague, who was a novice horse rider, rave about the McLellan saddle he rode on a pack trip.  I wondered if he correctly identified the saddle because I've never seen them in use for any regular horse sport.  I've never used one, but wonder how comfortable they are.  --John

Personally I ride this saddle (original 1904 ) and I use it for riding in mountains. For me it's best  saddle -  light, best balance, short etc.

I did this one for a man who celebrate US Cavalary in Germany. 

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On 1/2/2019 at 9:29 AM, chrisash said:

Comfort and Army go together with Military Intelligence

:lol:

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I know this thread is a little old...but then so am I. :)

From where do you source your brass parts? What weight of leather did you use? What type of leather (skirting, harness, etc) I have a late 1800s McClellan knock-off I'd like to rebuild/restore to usable condition. I've been told a 7-8oz skirting leather, but that feels heavier than what was originally on it. The original leather is suitable for patterns, but most of the seams were ripping out. Any handy hints and suggestions would be welcome. I'll be hand-stitching.

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Brass parts used to be fairly plentiful and easy to find - Mast Harness made a ton of reproduction pieces, and Weaver carried them for awhile after buying Mast out.  Doesn't look like Weaver lists their 'reenactment hardware' anymore.  Plenty of NOS repro brass on eBay, but oddly enough, the sellers tend to list them for original artifact prices :rolleyes2: .   Some folks have stashes tho...

The covers on military McClellan's were 6-7 oz. collar leather.  Having done new covers from tracings of old pieces, that will work, but you want to make and install the covers like the original were done.  Put all the leather pieces together OFF the saddletree, leaving only the outside seams open.  The smaller top sidebar covers can be stitched to the bottom covers where the arches are at.  This makes a "boneless" saddle - you case the leather and fit the cantle over first, then the pommel, and then pull the bottom covers through the center slot.  Fit the top sidebar tips over, then it's all about smoothing the leather, tacking the gaps along the pommel and cantle outside edges.  This just leaves the outer seams to stitch up..

Todd H.

https://www.militaryhorse.org/

 

 

 

closing_cover.png

fitting_cover.png

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20 hours ago, MilitaryHorse said:

Brass parts used to be fairly plentiful and easy to find - Mast Harness made a ton of reproduction pieces, and Weaver carried them for awhile after buying Mast out.  Doesn't look like Weaver lists their 'reenactment hardware' anymore.  Plenty of NOS repro brass on eBay, but oddly enough, the sellers tend to list them for original artifact prices :rolleyes2: .   Some folks have stashes tho...

The covers on military McClellan's were 6-7 oz. collar leather.  Having done new covers from tracings of old pieces, that will work, but you want to make and install the covers like the original were done.  Put all the leather pieces together OFF the saddletree, leaving only the outside seams open.  The smaller top sidebar covers can be stitched to the bottom covers where the arches are at.  This makes a "boneless" saddle - you case the leather and fit the cantle over first, then the pommel, and then pull the bottom covers through the center slot.  Fit the top sidebar tips over, then it's all about smoothing the leather, tacking the gaps along the pommel and cantle outside edges.  This just leaves the outer seams to stitch up..

Todd H.

https://www.militaryhorse.org/

 

 

 

closing_cover.png

fitting_cover.png

Fantastic pictures, for historical interest if nothing else!  I can see a Campbell/Randall stitcher being used the first picture.  It's rare to find such an old photograph of a leatherworker in action, with such clarity.

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Wow I am glad this thread came back to life. OP made a great looking saddle and I also love seeing old photos of leather workers doing thing deal.

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