Mocivnik

To add or not to add? (the wooden board to the back)

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So, since all the literature is out of me, here's the real question: Should I add the wooden board to the back of my workbench to hold tools or not?

What is all about? I just moved to another appartment, where I created myself a working bench - leatherwork. Below is the photo of it.

WxXX3DF.jpg

 

The desk is 30mm (or 1 3/16) plywood, which was covered with 2 thin layers of oil (used for cooking woodies and toys). Now I would like to get rid of the "mess" with the tools all around and add a board to the back. The desk itself is 56x141cm (or 23"x 56"). I would like to add the board at right angle at the back of height 43cm (17") and only 15mm thick (or 19/32").

Here's also the question: would 30mm part (or 1 3/16) hold enough with several screws onto the desk, if I would screw it at the right angle? Or should I cut it in 2 or even 3 pieces by the lenght? 

 

And to simplify stuff - here's the sketch of what I had in my mind. Dark brown are legs of the desk, yellow is the desk. I wanna set up the blue board (56x141cm or  23"x 56", thickness 15mm or 19/32") and use only several screws, RED sticks portrayed on the photo below. Will this work and be stable enough?

image.png.4052550d46413a1766c7829fd5732a7c.png

 

 

PS: All that I wrote had huge sense in my head. If there's anything confusing - please let me know, I'd be more than glad to explain myself (again or more into details).

 

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The board is for storage and quick access to the most commonly used tools. Punches and chisels on the left, knives and pens on the right. Edge strips and creasers on the extreme right, since they're used on long straps.

Rather than the normal leather loops I have found that I prefer the magnetic strips people put on their kitchen walls to hold knives. These hold punches, knives etc. pretty securely. Nails and hooks for bulkier tools like strap cutters.

The board doesn't need to be very strong -- 12mm of OSB would be plenty. Might want to attach it to the wall rather than the bench if you can. This prevents the board from being shaken when you pound on something on the bench and allows you to pull the bench out a bit form the wall, if cutting strips off a hide that's deeper than the table.

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Thank you very much for the comment, but i have something to say. 

Thanks for the comment on what to be where - helps alot!! 

I use also wooden tools and nonmetalic ones, i think i will use loops. 

And the last one - i cant attach it to the wall, but have to the desk :/

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The idea behind my layout is to have each tool as close to the hand in which it is used as is practically possible.

If you can't attach the board to the wall your plan should work fine, though I'd upgrade to 12mm plywood rather than OSB.

Or, at danger of overthinking it (my speciality), you could extend the board down to the floor, and attach it to some drawer or cupboard units for storage under the desk. That again isolates the board from any pounding you might do on the bench.

You can also put a shelf at the top of the board, for things like glue, each paint etc. I love having my glue pot within easy reach. My shelf is about eye height if standing at the bench and find that ideal as I rarely sit when working.

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7 hours ago, Mocivnik said:

i cant attach it to the wall,

So you may think of a diagonal bracing from the top of the backboard to the side of the desk...

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Ian Atkinson has a couple of videos on fitting out a workshop; you should find some useful ideas

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This visually explains my suggestion

image.png

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It looks to me like your top is a door blank which may or may not be solid core.  If you use the gussets as hwinbermuda shows and screw then into the back and the ends of your top, it may give you the support you need.  If you do add a shelf to the top you will definitely need more bracing then just screwing your back into the top.  Next best suggestion is to let your back go to the floor and fasten it to the legs as well as your top.  There is always more ways than one to skin a cat but I offer this advice based on my many years as a contractor building custom homes and doing remodels 

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14 hours ago, Matt S said:

If you can't attach the board to the wall your plan should work fine, though I'd upgrade to 12mm plywood rather than OSB.

Or, at danger of overthinking it (my speciality), you could extend the board down to the floor, and attach it to some drawer or cupboard units for storage under the desk. That again isolates the board from any pounding you might do on the bench.

You can also put a shelf at the top of the board, for things like glue, each paint etc. I love having my glue pot within easy reach. My shelf is about eye height if standing at the bench and find that ideal as I rarely sit when working.

I will use (most likely) 15mm plywood.

 

 

@zuludog: Yep, I saw his vids. But he attached his boards to the wall, I think.

@hwinbermuda: Yup! That's a great idea! I had an idea of only text already :)

@hasbeencowboy: it's not a door blank, but solid 30mm plywood. I will most likely tried as hwinbermuda recomended. I might not fasten it down to the legs of the desk, but will just use 3cm (1 1/4") of the board to screw it through. Will use brackets on side.

While the shelf..isn't a bad idea at all :) Will consider that aswell :) Thanks!

 

I just have to wait till my carpenter comes back to work (wrinkled ankle) to give him an order :)

 

PS2: Should I cut this board for behind into 2 or 3 pieces? Or should be solid one?

 

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Is the back board going to be pegboard? You can hold just about everything once you get your hooks/holders. 

But if you can't attach it to the wall, it's going to be a bit difficult. As someone already alluded to, attaching it to the desk is going cause problems when you start pounding on it as the vibrations transfer to the back board.  Can you attach it to that dresser(?) on the right?  Small space, but don't know how many tools you have. 

I like to have my workbench cleared of everything. Especially helpful when you're cutting a side or double shoulder

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On 4/1/2019 at 3:30 PM, Mocivnik said:

 which was covered with 2 thin layers of oil (used for cooking woodies and toys).

 

 

Whaaaat?

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I agree that the back board will shake about too much whilst working on the bench. Get a big board.Tall enough to go right from the floor to above your bench. Make it wide. Slide it between the bench and the wall; lean it on the wall, leave a small gap between the board and the bench. That board aint going nowheres; it'll just stay there not needing any extra support

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2 hours ago, fredk said:

shake about too much 

Not a problem I've experienced, but will bow to other's experience. Using a pound type board, on a sturdy bench, on strong legs should be ok.

I like the leaning board suggestion, though.

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I would use a couple lengths of 70mm X 35mm (3" X 1 1/2") structural pine (nice and cheap).

Bolt it to the rear legs of the table so that it reaches from the floor up to the top of the back board, which would be pegboard (lightweight and ready to accept hooks for tools) if I had a choice.

If the table is solid enough, there should not be any problem with shaking when hitting punches etc.

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Personally, since I'm on the petite side, I'm not a big fan of the back tool board. I have a short reach and a 36" deep work table, so I find having to reach that far over the table to get at my tools more awkward than it's worth. I use a moveable storage cart and a sturdy book case that sits beside my desk. Adam Savage has a pretty rad one that he built that wouldn't be too difficult. It's another option.

 

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