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AzShooter

Do you glue before making stitch holes?

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I normally just make holsters but I'm getting into wallets and bags for a few friends.  I normally cut out both sides of my project and do the normal preparations then I glue then I punch the stitch holes on each piece, glue them together and hope the holes match up.  I don't have a problem  with this but was watching a video where the person glued the pieces together first, then punched the holes.

It does look like this would be more consistent. Especially with the wallet I watch him make.  

Which technique do you use and why?

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I pre-punch the exterior, then I open the holes with an awl after assembled.

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Here are the methods I use for stitching, but firstly, Search YouTube for 'Nigel Armitage - Pouches' even if you don't want to make a pouch. He makes the holes before stitching, which he calls 'pre-pricking' and they are a masterclass of neat, precise working. For all my work I mark the line of stitching with dividers.

SHEATHS - Check the dry fit with clamps.......glue the pieces together......make holes with a stitching chisel.......if it doesn't penetrate all the way through I complete the holes with an awl......as I do this, I check that the awl is coming through on the marked stitching line......with a bit of practice, once you've got the alignment of the awl right you can be quite consistent

You could pre - prick sheath, it just depends what suits you

WALLETS - Check the pieces fit correctly, and you haven't forgotten one or made one back to front! ........ but there is less need to do this as they are mostly straight cuts........glue together......make holes with stitching chisels, which will usually go through all the thicknesses

BELTS - Make a pattern or template of the buckle end on card, showing the stitching holes, buckle slot, and gap for the keep if necessary........transfer to the leather......skive where necessary........fold over.......clamp ......sew. Card is cheaper than leather, and as the buckle end is a bit complicated, this will help to get the sequence right

I don't usually glue belts, just clamp; there are lots of belt making videos. JH Leather is good, but there are many others

There is no right or wrong way; watch videos and you'll see how other people make their items, and work out your own method

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Zuludog: Thanks.  That sounds like the way I need to do it.  I wondered what to do when I'm using leather too thick for my chisel.  Now I know.  

Your comments will really help me.

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Have a look at some of JH Leather's videos where she makes items out of thicker leather, like belts and dog's collars. She uses a pricking iron, which is similar to a stitching chisel but has shorter teeth. It just makes shallow depressions to mark the position of the stitching holes, but you make the actual holes with an awl. You will see that she can go very quickly using this method, but it does take a certain amount of practice to get to that stage

She also has a video on the saddle stitch, which she calls the double hand stitch, which shows this method more clearly

Edited by zuludog

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9 hours ago, zuludog said:

Have a look at some of JH Leather's videos where she makes items out of thicker leather, like belts and dog's collars. She uses a pricking iron, which is similar to a stitching chisel but has shorter teeth. It just makes shallow depressions to mark the position of the stitching holes, but you make the actual holes with an awl. You will see that she can go very quickly using this method, but it does take a certain amount of practice to get to that stage

She also has a video on the saddle stitch, which she calls the double hand stitch, which shows this method more clearly

I'll check out her videos.

I just picked up a new awl at Tandy today.

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I just put a little dumbbell on the two pieces of leather to keep them in place and then prick both layers at once.  Once stitched I cut again closer to the stitchline to get a perfect edge.

I avoid using glue when I can, I only use it when the above method is not doable for whatever reason.

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7 hours ago, AzShooter said:

I just picked up a new awl at Tandy today.

Most leatherworking tools only come with a basic finish; you'll probably need to sharpen and polish the awl so that it cuts & glides through the leather easily. There are several videos

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The pros and cons of glue are that it can be messy, cause problems on edge polishing, and affect the rigidity in the long term, depending on whar's used. It may, however, be unavoidable if the leather's very elastic. An alternative's to use a basting thread to tack key points togerher, usually in a distinctive colour so it can be removed as your sewing reaches it.

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Yeah, basting thread is a good idea. I even use it when hand-sewing a complicated item!

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Thanks for the advice.  I have a few ideas to follow now.  I do have tape and will be using it on my wallets and bags.  

 

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18 hours ago, Hardrada said:

Glue before punching holes. Excess glue can be removed with adhesive eraser right after pressing both pieces together, before the glue has time to harden.

https://tandyleather.ca/collections/supplies/products/heavy-duty-adhesive-eraser

 

That eraser can also be used to remove edge paint that lands on the leather.

What's an adhesive eraser?

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9 minutes ago, Sheilajeanne said:

What's an adhesive eraser?

Its a block of crepe rubber material. Sometimes it can rub off contact or surface glue.

Remember crepe? shoe soles were made of it in the 1950s - 'brothel creepers'

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Yeah, I had a pair of desert boots back in the day!  :P

I also have some crepe rubber I'm planning to use for moccasin soles.

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Ahh Desert boots, once worn in, they were so comfortable and lasted forever, maybe time to buy some again

Edited by chrisash

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Yes, they were very comfortable! But I found the crepe soles eventually deteriorated and actually stuck to the floor!  :o

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