chrisash

How do i get part stamps sharp at edges

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If we use a say oval shape to have a design say basketweave inside, how do we get nice sharp edges to the stamp design when only using a part of the stamp, i.e. angled stamp so it goes right up to the border line

When I try it with a tilted stamp the end result is a sharp design at one end and fading all the way to where it's lifted

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1 hour ago, chrisash said:

If we use a say oval shape to have a design say basketweave inside, how do we get nice sharp edges to the stamp design when only using a part of the stamp, i.e. angled stamp so it goes right up to the border line

When I try it with a tilted stamp the end result is a sharp design at one end and fading all the way to where it's lifted

buy 2 or 3 of each and grind off the ends...lol?  

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Is that for real?

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9 minutes ago, chrisash said:

Is that for real?

Thats the only way.  The reason most people use a camo tool at the edge of basketweave is to hide that faded from angling the tool.  The only other way to get it to the edge is to hand carve your basketweave.  Its a different look but its cool.

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I've done a bit of hand-carved basketweave in the past.
Doing it by hand probably takes just as much as planning, placing, and time as using the basketweave tool. But the look is certainly different, as immiketoo states.
(This makes me wonder just where that piece with the basketweave is located...hmm...did I give it away, or what?)

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18 minutes ago, DJole said:

I've done a bit of hand-carved basketweave in the past.
Doing it by hand probably takes just as much as planning, placing, and time as using the basketweave tool. But the look is certainly different, as immiketoo states.
(This makes me wonder just where that piece with the basketweave is located...hmm...did I give it away, or what?)

It takes four times the planning and execution of normal BW, but its awesome looking and you can fit it anywhere.

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I thought leatherwork was expensive yesterday and now you tell me I need about 4 of a few stamps and i don't even have a angle grinder! or even a sewing machine

Do all you guys have fully comprehensive insurance on your tool boxes or just very rich

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2 hours ago, chrisash said:

Is that for real?

Well, i meant it as a half joke/half truth...honestly i think if it was a huge concern for many there would be a market niche already there selling these at regular stamp prices.  In the end I think most folks figure out a way around it, or accept it as it is, but for the effect it would work.  the standard basket weave stamp is one of the cheaper widely available ones, watch for garage sales (may even find a bench grinder, which I'd suggest before the angle grinder) 

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3 hours ago, chrisash said:

I thought leatherwork was expensive yesterday and now you tell me I need about 4 of a few stamps and i don't even have a angle grinder! or even a sewing machine

Do all you guys have fully comprehensive insurance on your tool boxes or just very rich

Or, you could just not do any basketweaving patterns... :rolleyes: 

I hear you about the expense, but you realize that you don't really need ALL the toys to make it work! (Ian Atkinson has a lovely video where he points out what you can do with minimum investment -- find it here--> http://ianatkinson.net/leather/videos.htm
For a long time, I got by with an Xacto knife, one modeling spoon, an awl, and thread. Nothing else other than dyes and thread. Talk about cheap (except for the leather, of course!)
As time went by, I started adding tools, one, two at a time, as I realized I needed them to do certain things (like skiving and edge beveling). And one doesn't need many of the specialized modelling tools -- I used one beveler for a long time, till I realized that a certain design needed a smaller beveller. I recently picked up some under-cut bevellers on sale, and so now I have 2 smooth bevellers, 1 patterned cross-hatch beveller, and 2 undercut bevellers. This is all spread over 10 years, mind you. I only recently picked up a Camoflauge tool -- I don't do floral tooling, which is where that's mostly used, but the sale price was right. 
Only one basketweaving tool, though, which I rarely ever use...  It just doesn't match the style of the things or designs I do. 

I myself don't have an angle grinder, but I bet I can find a friend who does have one-- if, of course, I wanted to grind a tool.
A machine that will sew leather--that's something I'm not sure any of my friends has! Maybe one day, if I really needed to crank out stuff, I could save up for one. But for now, hand stitching is still what I do. 

4 hours ago, immiketoo said:

It takes four times the planning and execution of normal BW, but its awesome looking and you can fit it anywhere.

It certainly isn't for the faint of heart and the unsure of hand! One slip with the knife, and WHOOPS..

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Any know examples of the hand carved weave? I Googled it and found one example of a wood  carved weave on a gun handle.    

Edited by bullmoosepaddles

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@immiketoo posted this upcoming class: 

Watch the video and see some rather mind blowing examples. And then take that class when it is offered. I want to. That looks amazing and you need so little to do it not to mention adding that skill to your arsenal ;)

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5 hours ago, battlemunky said:

@immiketoo posted this upcoming class: 

Watch the video and see some rather mind blowing examples. And then take that class when it is offered. I want to. That looks amazing and you need so little to do it not to mention adding that skill to your arsenal ;)

Thanks man, Serge is a master of unconventional thinking.  Plus he's jut a cool dude to hang out with.  This class is also about minimalism and making awesome things with limited tools.

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Sergei Neskromski has a basket weave set of 2 stamps. One is full sized and one is half a stamp.

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No need to grind your stamps in half. Just position the leather on your quartz slab (or whatever you're using as a backing) so that the stamp will fall partly on the slab, and partly off.

Obviously, it may be a little tricky depending on what your design exactly is.

That's how I get half-impressions on larger border stamps when I run out of space:

 

 

holster_Border.jpg

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