DJole

Members
  • Content Count

    614
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About DJole

  • Rank
    Leatherworker
  • Birthday 02/13/1965

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Tacoma, WA
  • Interests
    Fiddles, books, big trees, leather, swords, and keeping the house intact.

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Dark Age and Medieval European inspired designs, pouches and boxes
  • Interested in learning about
    shoe-making, tooling, hand stitching

Recent Profile Visitors

7,277 profile views
  1. DJole

    Master Saddler and Professional Saddle Fitter

    Welcome to the forum! I'm curious -- why did you move to the USA, and why to that area of Illinois?
  2. DJole

    First baseball stitch

    Nice work! I did a similar thing on a sword scabbard I made a while back, using flat lace instead of thread like you did:
  3. DJole

    Video Ultra Slim Wallet

    That is an interesting design! Hammering the stitching chisel through all those layers takes a lot of careful hammering, too. I like seeing design work from outside the Anglosphere -- it is often subtly different.
  4. DJole

    Case for new cellphone

    I thought I would leave it natural, but use a highlighter on it. I haven't done that yet-- I'm still working on the other part.
  5. DJole

    Case for new cellphone

    Here is the back panel carving, just completed. I am very pleased with myself on this piece of work. That reverse carving background looks great, and I took a lot of care to get the lines evenly spaced. I can see that it's not perfect, but I am still proud of it.
  6. DJole

    Case for new cellphone

    Here's the front section, with an Angelus Burgundy background.
  7. DJole

    Tan Kote? Resolene? Leather Sheen?

    Maybe a video by Ian Atkinson (of Leodis Leather) which covers this topic will help: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyTg_hfpNUM
  8. DJole

    Stamp dilemma

    For starting traditional floral work, you need a set of the following (as listed in Al Stohlman's Leatherwork Manual from 1969): Camouflage, pear shader, beveller, veiner, seeder, and backgrounder. Now the difficult part is figuring out where to go from there, since each of these come in a dizzying variety of sizes (large, small, figure, etc.) and textures (smooth, lined, checked, ribbed, etc.) Since you are learning, you won't need 8 bevellers at the start (4 smooth of different sizes, and 4 checked in different sizes.) Most of us started with the basic set, and then picked up additional tools only as we needed them for a specific project (mulefoot, pebble backgrounder, different border designs, most of the figure carving tools, etc.) As to whether you should go immediately with the Barry King tools... I don't have the expertise to answer that question (or the budget for those Cadillac tools, either!) :-) Perhaps you should spend the money on better knives, rather than carving tools, at the moment. I understand the difference between a cheap swivel knife and a good one can make a lot of difference. And make sure you understand how to correctly case your leather, or else the tools won't work right and your frustration level will rise, as you can't figure out if the problem is you, the knife/tool, or the leather.
  9. DJole

    Dieselpunk backpack with skull and scrolls

    Is there any kind of finish on the inside of those leather straps? If not, they'll sure get soggy when the German skies send rain down on you.
  10. Thick leather like that is what a lot of people want to make armor out of. And it's expensive, too. Since that leather was given to you, you could sell it at a bargain price to SCA people in your area, then use that money to buy leather of the thickness you really want.
  11. DJole

    Not sure why it took so long...

    Welcome! More voices of experience are always valued, and it's good that the UK contingent keeps growing, too. Ac un Cymro rhagor yw peth da!
  12. DJole

    Greenhorn needs help leather

    Not a stupid question at all, since you don't want to spend money on the wrong kind of leather! You also might contact Brettun's Village, up in Maine, to see if they have the dyed veg-tan you need: <https://www.brettunsvillage.com/leather/> I don't work for them (wrong coast!), but they always have a wide variety of leather types and weights, and they might have yours available. Prices and service are fine, too.
  13. DJole

    Vietnam Vet checkbook/wallet

    You can also check out this video, by a resident leatherworker here on the forum, who does some fantastic work:
  14. DJole

    Vietnam Vet checkbook/wallet

    Welcome to the forum and to the world of leatherworking! Here's what I think I see in your bevelling (without getting a closeup view): Letter A is a side view of a beveller used to make a "trough." It's a common problem beginners have as they don't quite understand what the tool is supposed to do. See how there is no "relief", how both sides of the line are equal height? Letter B is what you want-- the beveller is used to push down the leather to make a gradual slope, which fades out away from the design element. This makes the design stand out from the surface of the leather. Want to see it in real life? Take a quick view here: Doing the bevelled lines right will help the antiquing work correctly.
  15. It's got to be an optical trick...you found some giant-size tools and put them into the photo, right? Seriously, though... those are TINY lines you did there! I don't know how you pulled it off, but you did. That would be a difficult how-to video to make, since the movements would be so small. I have a couple designs I have shelved simply because they have some very, very small and narrow lines, and I just don't want to mess with them yet. I'm considering laser engraving instead.