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Flattening a Tandy round knife

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Completely OT but not worth a thread of its own: All this talk about steel and sharpening makes me wonder whether I should try to strop my bread knife. A dowel rod a bit smaller than a tooth, some leather stuck to it, honing compound - could work, couldn't it?

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On 6/4/2021 at 12:40 AM, Klara said:

Completely OT but not worth a thread of its own: All this talk about steel and sharpening makes me wonder whether I should try to strop my bread knife. A dowel rod a bit smaller than a tooth, some leather stuck to it, honing compound - could work, couldn't it?

Sure it would work but if you have a plain old butchers/ kitchen steel it works every bit as good on a bread knife as any kitchen knife. Once you have your edge just hit it a few licks with the steel then again after after cutting your bread then wipe it down and put it away for next time. No need to overthink sharpening its been done successfully for centuries. 

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The diameter of steel I have is bigger than the diameter of the teeth. My bread knife doesn't have one edge but many - in a book on kitchen knives I've read that bread knives are probably not worth sharpening, one should buy a new one when they no longer cut at all. They do saw pretty well for a pretty well for a pretty long time, after all. But I was struck how well my new knife cut, and I believe it has lost that edge (pun intended. Interesting how many everyday expressions are knife-related, isn't it? )

 

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On 4/26/2020 at 4:04 AM, RockyAussie said:

a bluntened off  belt

There's Aussie right there! Made me smile Brian.

I sometimes think thats where I should have been. Three of us were going to do the £10 thing many years ago but I chickened out. But there's defo some Aussie in me. Couldn't handle the flies though.

Edited by toxo

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On 6/1/2021 at 8:02 AM, Klara said:

Are there even any round knives on the market where the exact kind of steel is known?

I've been thinking whether I should ask my knife-making friend to make me one - or book a workshop to make one with his instruction - but I'd get two new Osbornes for the price, with a more certain outcome...

 

Steel manufacturers know exactly the kind of steel they're making. Good steel can be ruined in the process but starting off with the right steel is half the battle.

Klara, If you want to make a knife try a high speed circular saw blade thats made for cutting steel. cut it out with a grinder but cut it oversize so you don't ruin the edge. Keeping it cool is uber important at all times but more so later when working on the edge. A rule of thumb is the colour of the sparks. The brighter the sparks, the more carbon is in the steel. Put an old file on the grinder to get what I mean. Don't worry about this talk of "too brittle" we're talking about a knife here not a hardwood axe.

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2 hours ago, Klara said:

The diameter of steel I have is bigger than the diameter of the teeth. My bread knife doesn't have one edge but many - in a book on kitchen knives I've read that bread knives are probably not worth sharpening, one should buy a new one when they no longer cut at all. They do saw pretty well for a pretty well for a pretty long time, after all. But I was struck how well my new knife cut, and I believe it has lost that edge (pun intended. Interesting how many everyday expressions are knife-related, isn't it? )

 

Wrap some fine emery paper around the right size rod for the size of the teeth. You could even use a wooden dowel with some of the honing compound on it. Nothing to lose.

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6 hours ago, Klara said:

The diameter of steel I have is bigger than the diameter of the teeth. My bread knife doesn't have one edge but many - in a book on kitchen knives I've read that bread knives are probably not worth sharpening, one should buy a new one when they no longer cut at all. They do saw pretty well for a pretty well for a pretty long time, after all. But I was struck how well my new knife cut, and I believe it has lost that edge (pun intended. Interesting how many everyday expressions are knife-related, isn't it? )

 

i'm sorry i use a straight bladed bread knife lol because i hate serrated blades for just this reason. You can still use the steel on the flat side of the blade or get a small round diamond stone or even regular round stone, your dowel would work also.

 

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7 hours ago, chuck123wapati said:

i'm sorry i use a straight bladed bread knife lol because i hate serrated blades for just this reason. You can still use the steel on the flat side of the blade or get a small round diamond stone or even regular round stone, your dowel would work also.

 

Out of curiosity: What makes a straight-bladed bread knife a bread knife instead of just another kitchen knife? This afternoon I attacked mine with a dowel rod, sandpaper and honing compound, but I couldn't say whether it's now better than it was.

But I discovered that IKEA does identify the steel: X50CrMoV15. Whatever that means...

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1 hour ago, Klara said:

Out of curiosity: What makes a straight-bladed bread knife a bread knife instead of just another kitchen knife? This afternoon I attacked mine with a dowel rod, sandpaper and honing compound, but I couldn't say whether it's now better than it was.

But I discovered that IKEA does identify the steel: X50CrMoV15. Whatever that means...

Mine are really long very slender knives with a blunt tip and straight cutting edge other than that really nothing, they work awesome for cutting tomatoes paper thin also ham or roasts. Mine are pretty old, probably made in the 50s, before they mostly went to serrated blades, i have the complete set of Maxam kitchen knives they were made in Japan and are really nice tools. they have to be kept razor sharp to get through the crust but when they are you can cut very straight with them

X50crmov15 is stainless steel made in Germany. It's somewhere between mid- and high-range quality-wise. This is the go-to option for people who want a great knife they can rely on for the right price. This steel has little to no flaws and great reviews all around.X50CrMoV15 Steel is synonymous with kitchen knives. If you're shopping for a new kitchen or chef knife today, chances are high you'll get a knife from a popular brand with the X50CrMoV15 Steel blade

Edited by chuck123wapati

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Thanks for the info! I was struck by how well my first Vörda knife cut when new (I admit I find them hard to sharpen and am not as diligent as I should be) - I picked it up for 5 € in the returns section. The regular price isn't much higher...

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On 6/7/2021 at 1:20 AM, Klara said:

Thanks for the info! I was struck by how well my first Vörda knife cut when new (I admit I find them hard to sharpen and am not as diligent as I should be) - I picked it up for 5 € in the returns section. The regular price isn't much higher...

your very welcome, that was a good buy indeed i buy many knives from our local thrift store and yard sales etc. You have to know what your looking at however.

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