blinddog

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About blinddog

  • Rank
    Contributing Member
  • Birthday 07/01/1911

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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Tulsa, Oklahoma

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Motorcycle Gear
  • Interested in learning about
    Shoemaking
  1. happy birthday..young man..

  2. blinddog

    Looking For Landis Nameplate.

    Does anyone have a stamped aluminum Landis badge in good shape like was on a 5 in 1 that they would be willing to sell? (or know of a source?) See attachment for reference. Happy Trails, Jeff
  3. blinddog

    Looking For Shoemaking Tools

    Thanks for the heads up! Jeff
  4. blinddog

    Looking For Shoemaking Tools

    Hi Henry, I might not be using the right term for it, but it's the stone the clicker in a shoe workshop uses to keep an edge on his clicking knife. They are about the size of a man's index finger with a blunt taper at the working end. Generally, a piece of leather is put about half way down the stone as a finger guard. I've seen these in eBay auctions of shoemaking stuff, but haven't been able to snag one. It seems they are more prevalent in Europe than on this side of the pond. :-( I've been using my kitchen steel to touch up my edges while working, but it just doesn't give me the keen knives I need to work efficiently. Happy Trails, Jeff
  5. blinddog

    Looking For Shoemaking Tools

    Hi All, I'm looking for some shoemaking tools if anyone has extras or a good source, I'd love to hear from you. Specifically, I need Peg Floats, Burnishing Irons, and a Welt Creasing Wheel. Also, I'm desperately searching for a source for the finger shaped Clicker's Whetstones. Thanks, Jeff
  6. Cutting stingray is a bear because of the "buttons". I've had my best results using a pair of tinsnips.. Happy Trails, Jeff
  7. blinddog

    my handsewing technique

    Hi All, Just ran across this thread, and couldn't find any good pics of my 12# or finer handstitching, so I took this one of a quick and dirty swivel knife sheath I made years ago. I don't claim it's a great example of fine handstitching (note the bobble in the middle of the top row!), but it's an illustration of how fine you can go with needles and an awl. As I recall this was sewn with waxed 2 cord Barbour's linen, and I eyeballed the 12 spi. 'cause I didn't have a #12 overstitch at the time. Happy Trails, Jeff
  8. blinddog

    laser engraving

    Hi Randy, Jack Justis of Justis cases in Florida has used laser engraving on the pockets of his pool cue cases for years. It gives a fast, lasting design and doesn't make all of those thumping sounds! check 'em out here: http://www.justiscases.net/ Stay safe out there, Jeff
  9. blinddog

    puckers up between stitches

    It looks as if you might be pulling the stitches too tight judging from the appearance of the gusset pic. Two other things that come to mind: Are you gluing the joint before you sew it? I've had things "creep" on me if I didn't glue up a box joint. Also, you might find that it "puckers" less if you use a finer stitch. Happy Trails, Jeff
  10. All of the LF/Tandy dyes and finishes are manufactured and packaged by Feibing's now.
  11. blinddog

    wet or dry leather for stitching groover?

    Hi Sscott, On the stitching groover, I always get the best results with the leather dry. If I recall correctly, Leather Factory sells two different groovers. One is a real lightweight affair with a set screw in it, never been able to cut a decent stitching groove with one of these. The other is a bit heavier with a collar that screws down to retain the bit/blade. The heavier one is a pretty good tool (made by IVAN-Taiwan). Whichever one you have, the blade must be sharp like any other cutting tool. I always strop mine before I start cutting any stitching grooves, using a pair of vice grip pliers to get a good grip on the naked bit. Just strop on your rouge board in the opposite of the direction you would drag it to cut, until you have a nice polished edge right up to the hole. Even though you are only removing a small bit of leather, it still has to be very sharp for it to cut a clean line with any control. Happy Trails, J