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Mattsbagger

Stitching horse.

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After a year and about 30 antique shops finally found one! $85.00 need to replace the leather strap and wrap the jaws in leather but should be good to go after that. Still pretty tight just a bit of a wiggle.

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That is a great find! any idea how old it is?

 

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No clue. It is OLD. Haven't found any markings on it. Flat head screws and saw a horse shoe nail repair. It seems to be hand made. It's rough not polished like it was made for sale. If you know what I mean.

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Good find.

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Your persistence paid off at last!
Nice to see a piece of working equipment being returned to work, instead of gathering dust in a corner.

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Very likely a homemade horse.  Very cool find.

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Nice! 

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Great find! 

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Nice piece, I’m currently making one from pallet wood so good to see variations.

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Ohhh, I was hoping to see a horse stitching... I was curious how one would hold the needles.. hehehe

Seriously though, that's a great find. I like things like that. Take something old and give it new life. 

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Hate to do it but I think I'm gonna have to replace the screws on the upper hinge with carriage bolts. And probably use a carriage bolt to hold the strap instead of nails to the pivot arm. It looks like they have replaced the strap a couple times. Also need to beef up the locking leg as its split. Thinkimg wet rawhide strap wrapped on it. Never used before bit understand that its strong when dried.

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Edited by Mattsbagger

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At the time of construction I'm sure it was purpose built. The maker probably didn't give it any more credit but to last as long as until he could build another.

But then it outlived him. Carry on at fixing it up.

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Great find.

The original maker would have surely repaired it as necessary, had he outlived it.

 

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Great find, you should be able to find similar flat headed screws if needed at you local ace/true value/do it best hardware store. If not they can be found online. 

As for the split wood a little no expansion gorilla glue should do the trick or epoxy. 

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Are the screws still good but just loose?  If they're loose I would plug the holes with dowels and epoxy (actually just epoxy would work too) then redrill them and keep using the screws.  It's a really cool and not overly common find.  It's worth the extra effort to keep it as original as you can.

Most modern screws just don't look right.  I do have some mostly larger sized old screws that I've saved over the years if you need some replacements. I'd be happy to send you some if they're the size(s) you need.

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There are a couple that are loose/stripped. They are also cracked that's why I was thinking bolts. Woods a bit dry also.lol

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Feed the wood, with teak oil or boiled linseed oil.

If this were mine; I'd drill out every damaged screw hole and use wood working PVA or Scotch glue to glue in dowels, which I'd drill to take brass screws

Its an unusual design with the clam at an angle like that

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Been rebuilding old Coleman lanters for awhile, and the old pump cups are made from leather.  we just soak them in neatsfoot oil for a bit, and the old stiff leather is like new again.  When I found my stitching horse, the leather was also dried and cracked.  Didn't soak it in neatsfoot oil, but applied several liberal coats. Althogh still cracked, the leather is no longer stiff, and I am not afraid that it is going to snap when applying pressure with the foot pedal.

+1 for pounding small dowels into the stripped wood holes and using the original screws.  

Keep your stitching horse as original as you can for as long as you can. But most of all enjoy!

FWIW, a photo of mine.  The end of the strap forms a loop with a metal rod throgh the loop which then rests in grooves in the jaw.  I think this was done by a previous owner.  I believe the original design had the strap nailed to the jaw as I can see some holes where the nails would have been.

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Edited by RemingtonSteel
added photo

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I do have some teak oil. Will put some of that on. Colorado is a dry state. Humid is 25%.lol

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Depending on the size of the stripped screw holes, some regular wood glue and toothpicks have worked for me in the past. If the holes aren't large enough for using a dowel, just squirt some glue in the hole, dip each toothpick in glue, then shove them in the hole until you can't get anymore in. Clean up any excess glue. After the glue dries, trim the toothpicks flush to the surface. The screw will go back in with the toothpicks to bite into.I don't think I'v ever had to do that repair a second time on anything.

Edited by byggyns

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I've done the same with old wood matches.

39 minutes ago, byggyns said:

Depending on the size of the stripped screw holes, some regular wood glue and toothpicks have worked for me in the past. If the holes aren't large enough for using a dowel, just squirt some glue in the hole, dip each toothpick in glue, then shove them in the hole until you can't get anymore in. Clean up any excess glue. After the glue dries, trim the toothpicks flush to the surface. The screw will go back in with the toothpicks to bite into.I don't think I'v ever had to do that repair a second time on anything.

 

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