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My FIL once told me that a craftsman isn't someone that does everything perfect, but someone that knows how to fix their mistakes like they never even happened.  I've pretty much taken that to heart. 

So I've been obscenely busy lately, work is picking up, lots of holster orders (for a side gig anyway), family, and trying to work in some vacation days.  I got a bit behind and in a hurry.  A buddy asked me to make him a holster for his PMR30.  I made a holster similar to what he wants for a M&P full size recently so when I was cutting other holsters I slightly re worked the pattern and cut his too.  

I cut all but one piece.  The one that I use to stitch in the t nut for the snap.  Kind of important when you are putting on a strap.  Also, kind of the very first thing I should be stitching, not the last.  I realized this about half way through stitching his holster.  Promptly tossed the holster to the foot of the bed, where I do most of my stitching.  Decided better of it and finished it anyway.  

I let the holster sit a few days while I stewed on whether to try to finish it, and how to.  Or if I start over.  Yesterday it hit me what I should try, and it ended up working. 

This is the holster with the piece glued on, imaging getting half way "finished" and realizing you didn't even start it correctly.  ugh  So the obvious problem is there is not enough room inside to hand stitch.  And my sofa needles are way too big.  I probably need to look for something smaller for the next time.  

KARjWrZ.jpg

So here was my solution.  I also tie my own flies.  This is the threader for my bobbins.  

 

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And the threader in action.  It worked perfectly.  I did have to drill the new holes out because my awl in drill process would not work without damaging the holster.  And this also made it easier to find the holes on the inside.  I started all my stitches on the inside hole, then ran the second stitch from the outside where I could force the threader through easier.  The pic is starting from the outside.  Also managed to get a couple back stitches in. 

 

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And better yet, I get to sell it instead of tossing it, or keeping it around and acting like I'll use it one day.  

Edited by chiefjason

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11 minutes ago, chiefjason said:

So the obvious problem is there is not enough room inside to hand stitch.  And my sofa needles are way too big.  I probably need to look for something smaller for the next time.

That is a great solution to a tricky problem. When I started reading your post, I imagined that you would have solved it using curved needles. I'm not sure what the sofa needle you use looks like, but I use tapestry needles for my stitching, and your problem helped me find something that I honestly did not know existed, curved tapestry needles. Thank you for sharing your problem and finding a creative solution.

curved tapestry needles.jpg

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Necessity is the mother of invention..take a bow.. :)

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Thanks for sharing! And now another thing to add to my shopping list...

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I have seen a video of a shoemaker do a Blake stitch by hand in a similar fashion. I think he used a bent over piano string.

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Nice save! Thanks for the share!

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1 hour ago, bikermutt07 said:

I have seen a video of a shoemaker do a Blake stitch by hand in a similar fashion. I think he used a bent over piano string.

That's pretty much what the bobbin threader is, just with the bead to grab it.  

 

I have curved needles but I find that the eyes are so large they are near impossible to use in leather.  Most likely, I just need to look harder for needles that would suit my needs.  Just something to keep an eye out for, the eye is the hardest part to pass and it's having to do it as it curves.  

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If i were you, i would just cut 2 needles off about 1/2inch from the loop in it. Thats how you get very small meedle and for those 10 holes it should work just fine. Its cheaper to buy 2 mew needles than leather for new holster. And you can just make it perfect from now on. 

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