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sbrownn

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About sbrownn

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  • Birthday 07/06/1948

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    United States

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  1. Why would you use anything else? That's what it is specifically designed for...lubricating gears.
  2. You don't give any specifications on the air flow and pressure necessary to run the vacuum system so no one can tell you the minimum compressor size needed, let alone source you a quiet one.
  3. The heat comes from compressing the air; the motor heat is insignificant by comparison.
  4. I think you should donate some to the animal shelter and give the rest away.
  5. Are you going to finish the edges or is that the final product?
  6. And I think it's better to separate the two operations. It's a lot of work, clean it and then condition it and use a specialized product tailored specifically for each step.
  7. Indeed Dwight...good choice. The Weaver Cub could be modified to put a servo motor on but you might as well just buy a Cowboy 3200 because that's where you will probably eventually end up anyway. Unless you need to sew in a place with no power the hand operated machines are too close to the price of a motor operated one. As you branch out into other items you might find yourself with a lot of straight sewing runs which will make you wish you had a motor. I do a lot of guitar straps and when I get to the end of the straight run I just run the machine by hand to get through the complicated end curves and then its back to the motor.
  8. My rawhide mallet has ends that are replaceable.
  9. I have one. It might be good for watch strap holes but I don't make watch straps so I never use it.
  10. Rather than using a drill bit I just chuck my punch in the drill press as it makes a much cleaner hole.
  11. You didn't say what particular problems you are having but with the set up pictured you should be able to successfully set any of the snaps shown. My guess would be that once you have selected the correct die for the snap you are setting then it's just a matter of setting the pressure. The quality of the snap you are using also makes a difference; they aren't all the same even though they may look the same.
  12. I've successfully molded chrome tan by sticking in in the microwave for 15 seconds before I put it in the mold. I'm not sure what the heat does but it definitely makes a difference.
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