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After a couple of pretty severe needle strikes my usually very reliable sewing machine (Seiko LCW-8BL) has developed persistent problems. Mostly thread jams and needle thread breakages. I've done the usual re-threading, bobbin changing and needle replacement to no avail. However I've noticed that the tip of the hook looks like it's been chipped and I suspect that it's piercing and cutting the needle thread.

These are the best photos I was able to get. It looks like the hook is a little shortened, and the inside edge is very sharp. The outer edge of the hook is smooth and polished.

A replacement good quality hook is not cheap but it's a cost I'm just going to have to swallow if that's what's needed. What are my chances of grinding and polishing the damaged hook into function? Should I just pony up for a Hirose?

hook1.jpg

hook2.jpg

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I don't think the word grinding has a place in the discussion of fixing your hook . 

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I would take the hook out and buff and polish the hook and then show us some pics.  unless the tip is broken off or is gotten short,  I normally can be salvaged.

glenn

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45 minutes ago, DFH said:

I don't think the word grinding has a place in the discussion of fixing your hook . 

Normally I'd agree with you, but I think there's now a severe angle change that needs severe correction.

42 minutes ago, shoepatcher said:

I would take the hook out and buff and polish the hook and then show us some pics.  unless the tip is broken off or is gotten short,  I normally can be salvaged.

I've pulled the hook, hopefully these photos are a little clearer. I'm no photographer.

As can be seen the angle of the tip now changes very abruptly at the point, which also exhibits a flat shiny spot on the very end. This makes me think that the point has gone, possibly shortening the hook. There's a slight burr on the outer edge of the hook tip now, which wasn't there before the needle strikes.

hook3.jpg

hook4.jpg

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I would recommend some sanding with a few levels of grit papers.

These particularly I think about here can be refference in laymen terms as color sanding types.

Additionaly these Im sure you know are, easily obtained with automotive/paint specialty supplys. 

I recall an important bit mentioned with this type hook service; A good rule is to have minimal surface change on the outside.

Luckily as your photos show, a good workup on the inside is all that's needed. 

It maybe another opportunity if you have supply, to use a compound grit in final steps. This i have used at times with canvas, or on a peice of tough veg tan. 

An interesting question is what kind of clearence is or was there at the hook, along with was there any noticed timing change. 

 

Have a good day

Floyd

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If you use this machine to earn money, buy a new hook. It is a writeoff and will keep you in business with the least downtime.

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Wet/dry type sandpaper, saturated with sewing oil. Works great. Start with very fine and work up to polishing grades like 1500 and 2000 grit.

Or yeah... new hook.

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That hook can be salvaged.  If not, buy a new one.    Hirose are very good aftermarket hooks.

glenn

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I would certainly have a go at fixing it (but I'm like that!). As Floyd said the damage appears to be on the inside so fine grinding wheels in a Dremel should take out the worst of it followed by fine wet and dry (used wet) then buffing wheels and polishing paste. I've treated a slightly damaged hook this way (not me, it came with the machine) and it now works fine.

And try not to hit the hook with the needle, it's not supposed to do that.:P:)

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When your trying to touchup a hook like this never take any metal off the outside,just the inside,I would say it could be saved with careful sanding,use some 220 emery to get rid of the burr & then smooth it up with some finer emery.You might also want to get a new hook on order for backup.

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