Ingrid H

Stitching Pony

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I saw this and had to buy it!  Here it is all cleaned up and with new leather since the old leather was rotted out.  Any idea what era it's from?  There are lots of slot head screws and it's very beefy.

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If it helps at all, this was the original loop that attached to the foot pedal:

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I have no idea of when it might have been made, but I love the horse legs!    

 

-Bill

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46 minutes ago, billybopp said:

I have no idea of when it might have been made, but I love the horse legs!    

 

-Bill

Me too!  That was the largest attraction for me :)

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Horse legs-- a whimsical touch to the piece, for sure!
Do you have any oblique or front-on photos, rather than just the side photos? 

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7 hours ago, DJole said:

Horse legs-- a whimsical touch to the piece, for sure!
Do you have any oblique or front-on photos, rather than just the side photos? 

I don't, but the vertical boards are just parallel and spaced about 3/4" apart with 3/8" jaws on each side.  It's not the most versatile set-up, but I mostly just do straps anyway.

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Very cool!  I also love the hooves.  Unless there is some identifiable maker's mark, there is always the possibility that it was homemade.  In any event, glad you have it and can show it the love it deserves.

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Love, love, love the legs/feet!

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interesting piece of furniture

mmmm, my thumbs are itchy, I'm getting the feeling that this was made in the 1930s/early part of 1940s. Looks like the wood  was scumbled, probably a cheap pine or white wood underneath. Very nice piece for all that anyhows

Edited by fredk

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9 hours ago, fredk said:

interesting piece of furniture

mmmm, my thumbs are itchy, I'm getting the feeling that this was made in the 1930s/early part of 1940s. Looks like the wood  was scumbled, probably a cheap pine or white wood underneath. Very nice piece for all that anyhows

Yes, I'm pretty sure it is mostly white pine.  Thanks for the guess!

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The dowel rods look pretty modern to me, I would look closely at the hinges they may have some clues, China made , japan made, etc, I would guess homemade possibly a boy scout, or 4h project piece. It is very cool would love to get some measurements and more pics to build one myself.

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On 5/20/2019 at 8:14 AM, Tugadude said:

Very cool!  I also love the hooves.  Unless there is some identifiable maker's mark, there is always the possibility that it was homemade.  In any event, glad you have it and can show it the love it deserves.

There is a name on the underside.  I don't know if it is the maker or owner.  Maybe the style of mark can help date this piece.  Varney is a fairly common name in Maine.

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On 5/21/2019 at 3:12 PM, chuck123wapati said:

The dowel rods look pretty modern to me, I would look closely at the hinges they may have some clues, China made , japan made, etc, I would guess homemade possibly a boy scout, or 4h project piece. It is very cool would love to get some measurements and more pics to build one myself.

My first thought was that this was a Popular Mechanics plan. 

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The name has been cut in simply in the angular style as that is easy to cut in wood using a chisel or knife, but the overall look of the letters is later-Art Deco as the cutter has not tried any curves which he/she could have done as they did on the horse head engraving [assuming it was the same person and probably was - a maker cuts their name in, a new owner writes it in pencil or pen]

I don't think you can date anything by the dowels; dowels have been in use since the 1600s. But the spreader bar on the left side [far side of the photo] is simplistic, but slightly fancy [the ends]. A fancy turned spreader would be pre-1920s, a plainer one from the 1950s onwards

The hinges are typical of the type used in drop-leaf tables of the 1920s to 1950s

Importantly too is the saw cut lines on the bottom of that board. Not bought pre-planed then, cut with either a very large straight hand saw or a very large circular saw, of about 3m [10ft] diameter

It could be a 'Mechanics' plan but there were and maybe still are a large number of woodworking magazines. My father did his time and was a cabinet maker. He subscribed to many of those magazines and made many of the pieces in them for our family and for customers

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I'm sticking with my theory that it is homemade

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So.."stitching" is best pony ?

:)
Or is uniqorn ..

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I can't help with the era, but it is really beautiful. What a great find!

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On 5/19/2019 at 5:00 PM, Ingrid H said:

If it helps at all, this was the original loop that attached to the foot pedal:

IMG_0373 - Edited.jpg

 

That looks exactly like the end of an English bridle rein. That's the part of the rein that attaches to the bit.  I imagine the owner recycled a broken rein to make the strap! Reins are one of the bits of tack that most often gets broken if a horse runs away, and steps on them.

Edited by Sheilajeanne

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