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TechSew 5100 -- metal piece sheared right off!

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I was just starting to sew on my TechSew 5100 this afternoon -- I had literally taken 2 stitches -- when a piece of metal flew out of the bobbin area. The piece had completely sheared off. Has anyone had this happen before? I bought the machine new from TechSew about 6 months ago and have used it lightly since then, probably only an hour or two a month, so I'm surprised.  I assume it's a (major!) manufacturing defect in the machine.

I emailed their support for help (they are closed for the weekend.) @Techsew Ron 

Has anyone had something like this happen?  Any tips to avoid this in the future? 

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Edited by SewMuchToLearn

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https://www.techsew.com/en/techsew-5100-4100-shuttle-hook.html

I'm sure Techsew will want to take care of that for you very soon. At least I hope they will. You probably found the part already, but here's the link to what I found on their site. Techsew was one of the machines I was considering when I get a cylinder arm. I'm wondering now what the material is they make that hook out of and where it's manufactured. Also wondering what your options are for quality. Can another brand be purchased like Cerliani??? Just a thought.

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WOW! That was your hook driver!

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2 hours ago, SewMuchToLearn said:

Has anyone had something like this happen?

 

1 hour ago, Wizcrafts said:

WOW! That was your hook driver!

Like Wizcraft all I can say is holy shit, I have never see that one before. This would be a good example of what damage a safety clutch can prevent in the sub 441 class machines. Looking at the photo's I would also check everything associated with the driving of the bobbin assembly all the way back to the main drive.

1 hour ago, suzelle said:

I'm wondering now what the material is they make that hook out of and where it's manufactured.

Like most machines these days it's probably made in China or Taiwan (Republic of China).

kgg

Edited by kgg
added words

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:Holysheep: That is impressive! It must have been fractured when fitted, I don't see how you could do that otherwise.

A bit of JBWELD? Just kidding.

Edited by dikman

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I have never seen that before. I wonder if something was too tight or jamming the hook from turning like something in the hook race? One of the reasons I like to have those spring screws out 1.5 turns I guess. OIL should happen on the hook race ever hour of use by my reckoning as well. I am sure that Ron will help you out.

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When you look closely at the fracture you see what appears to be crystals.  From my limited knowledge of metallurgy, this is brittle fracture.  Here is some authoritative information if you want to study it a bit more.  https://www.corrosionpedia.com/definition/280/cleavage-fracture

Quoted from above article:

Cleavage fracture surfaces appear in steels due to:

  • Sudden or impact loading
  • Low temperature
  • High levels of constraint
  • Ambient temperature
  • Heavily cold-worked parts

I think the last item in the list is probably the root cause.  If it was the first item in the list, I would expect to see a lot more damage, likely in the drive train.  That is my guess, and am willing to stand corrected if there is a knowledgeable metallurgist here in the forum.

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46 minutes ago, Northmount said:

When you look closely at the fracture you see what appears to be crystals.  From my limited knowledge of metallurgy, this is brittle fracture.  Here is some authoritative information if you want to study it a bit more.  https://www.corrosionpedia.com/definition/280/cleavage-fracture

Quoted from above article:

Cleavage fracture surfaces appear in steels due to:

  • Sudden or impact loading
  • Low temperature
  • High levels of constraint
  • Ambient temperature
  • Heavily cold-worked parts

I think the last item in the list is probably the root cause.  If it was the first item in the list, I would expect to see a lot more damage, likely in the drive train.  That is my guess, and am willing to stand corrected if there is a knowledgeable metallurgist here in the forum.

Looks to me in the pictures the dark spots in the broken area it has been failing for awhile probably a bad casting from the get go. The crack probably started when they machined it.

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13 hours ago, Burkhardt said:

Looks to me in the pictures the dark spots in the broken area it has been failing for awhile probably a bad casting from the get go. The crack probably started when they machined it.

Yes, the discontinuities in the crystal structure pretty much says bad casting and mill work.

 

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What looks like a dark groove in photo Nr. 1......is that groove worn in there since purchase or is it designed in?  It 'looks' like that worn area and its mating surface might have seized up or at least had very high friction loading.

Looks like some shrinkage cavities in the dark area. 

Did the needle survive?

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Ask for a complete new bobbin assembly rather than just the hook as you never know what strain was put on the rest of the assembly

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On 9/17/2022 at 2:10 PM, MikeRock said:

Did the needle survive?

Yes the needle survived. 

 

14 hours ago, chrisash said:

Ask for a complete new bobbin assembly rather than just the hook as you never know what strain was put on the rest of the assembly

Yes, I will do that. 

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I am still waiting to hear from Techsew support on this. It is frustrating to have such a huge failure of the machine and no resolution from TechSew customer support. I've called and emailed them, and now I've lost another day of sewing time. I've heard such great things about TechSew support, but I have not experienced it yet. I'm hoping they can restore my faith in the brand!  @Techsew Ron

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I spoke with one of our dealers and he told me that the shuttle driver is usually pinned to the end of the lower shaft. If that's the case, the entire lower shaft may have to be pulled out to remove the remnants of the driver and reinstall a new one (and its pin). All the components inside the arm will have to be stripped off the shaft as it is pulled out and secured in the proper order.The machine will have to re-timed after the new parts and bottom shaft are installed. This will be a thankless job. The best outcome would be if the shaft only has to be pulled out far enough to drive out the old pin, install a new driver and drive in the pin.

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On 9/19/2022 at 11:34 PM, Wizcrafts said:

I spoke with one of our dealers and he told me that the shuttle driver is usually pinned to the end of the lower shaft. If that's the case, the entire lower shaft may have to be pulled out to remove the remnants of the driver and reinstall a new one (and its pin). All the components inside the arm will have to be stripped off the shaft as it is pulled out and secured in the proper order.The machine will have to re-timed after the new parts and bottom shaft are installed. This will be a thankless job. The best outcome would be if the shaft only has to be pulled out far enough to drive out the old pin, install a new driver and drive in the pin.

This is concerning to me, as I'm not mechanically inclined.  TechSew is shipping me a shuttle driver shaft assembly. They sent me links to videos on how to replace it:

Removing shuttle driver shaft assembly on the Techsew 5100 or 4100: https://youtu.be/sw63T_03mVA

Installing shuttle driver shaft assembly on the Techsew 5100 and 4100: https://youtu.be/6GYa5apW7Sc

 

They offered to have one of their technicians guide me over Facetime through it, so we will see how it goes. Not excited.

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7 hours ago, SewMuchToLearn said:

They offered to have one of their technicians guide me over Facetime through it, so we will see how it goes. Not excited.

NO !!!!  I'll be asking for a replacement machine . I can repair a few simple things on my machine, but I'm not THAT technically minded either .  What is the warranty  T & C's on the machine? 

On 9/17/2022 at 11:20 AM, Northmount said:

From my limited knowledge of metallurgy, this is brittle fracture.

I know  our laws are different, but under ' Australian Consumer Law' that would be considered a ' catastrophic failure'. It's up to the company to deal with this issue,  not  the customer.

Its their machine, their name, and their reputation. 

HS

 

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11 hours ago, SewMuchToLearn said:

Removing shuttle driver shaft assembly on the Techsew 5100 or 4100:

You may find using a "T" style angle key like shown in the video may twist depending on how tight the bolt was originally installed. You may want to consider using a 6mm angle key socket and racket with a short extension to eliminate possible twisting / striping problems.

kgg

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1 hour ago, kgg said:

You may find using a "T" style angle key like shown in the video may twist depending on how tight the bolt was originally installed. You may want to consider using a 6mm angle key socket and racket with a short extension to eliminate possible twisting / striping problems.

kgg

Good points,but if he uses a rachet w/a extension he better hold it alittle sideways(instead of going straight in) so it doesn't strip it out as these are real tight.

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8 minutes ago, CowboyBob said:

but if he uses a rachet w/a extension he better hold it alittle sideways(instead of going straight in) so it doesn't strip it out as these are real tight.

Excellent point. The reason I  mentioned using a socket style is that some of the "T" style wrenches are shall we say less then and can twist like a cork screw leading too both the wrench tip and bolt stripping out. Guess how I know.

kgg

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15 minutes ago, kgg said:

Excellent point. The reason I  mentioned using a socket style is that some of the "T" style wrenches are shall we say less then and can twist like a cork screw leading too both the wrench tip and bolt stripping out. Guess how I know.

kgg

:17:

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@CowboyBob  & @kgg If he chooses to do the work himself  and makes  any mistakes, would that void any warranties?   Assuming this machine is under warranty? He's only had it six months .   If so, I wouldn't  even touch it  IMO . 

HS

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16 minutes ago, Handstitched said:

If he chooses to do the work himself  and makes  any mistakes, would that void any warranties?

According to what I found on their website they encourage the repairs to be done by the owner.

From their website: ( www.techsew.com/en/help-center/do-you-offer-a-warranty-on-your-machines/ )

" We offer a Limited Lifetime Warranty with free technical support on all industrial sewing machines and skiving machines. All parts are guaranteed for 1 year by Techsew, except for consumable parts such needles, bobbins, bobbin cases, needle plates, presser feet, feed dogs, needle bars, belts, thread guides, and hooks or shuttles. The motor is guaranteed for 1 year.

We encourage you to maintain and repair your own machine, and we offer free technical support (by phone and by email) for the life of your machine should you require assistance with adjustments and repairs. Damage due to improper use, neglect, impact damage and normal wear from use of the sewing machine are not covered under this warranty. In the rare case that your machine needs to be returned for repair, you will be responsible for delivery costs and fees both ways. Customers are strongly encouraged to keep the original box and packing material for the machine head, should it ever need a repair. "

kgg

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8 minutes ago, kgg said:

According to what I found on their website they encourage the repairs to be done by the owner.

WOW !!!!!!!!!!  They should never assume the owners are mechanics . Maintain & service, yes,

...repair?? NO !!   " Limited Lifetime ' warranty???  Wha....???  They should delete the words " Lifetime" . 

Thats like buying a new car, if it goes wrong, you're expected to fix it yourself??  

I know our consumer  laws are totally different, but that machine would be replaced here . 

HS

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1 hour ago, Handstitched said:


@CowboyBob  & @kgg If he chooses to do the work himself  and makes  any mistakes, would that void any warranties?   Assuming this machine is under warranty? He's only had it six months .   If so, I wouldn't  even touch it  IMO . 

HS

They do have a good video & it really isn't that hard of a job to do,you change it & then re-time it,1/2 hr time @ the most.

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