chrisash

List of Members sewing machines

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So much information on the forum about sewing machines, much from experts in their field, but what about what machines members use every day.

I propose on this thread members enclose some simple data on what they have and experience of, something like

Machine Make and model number, Proven Thickness of veg tan they have used it for,  Remarks including spares problems, clutch or servo, Walking feet etc

Edited by chrisash

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Guess with no takers it was seen as a bad idea, O well I tried

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It was a good question in itself. However, some of us have 6 or more sewing machines in regular use. My usage for machine X may differ from member Z's usage. For instance, I have my Singer compound feed walking foot machines setup so one uses only #69 and the other only #92 thread. The reason for this is because their job is to sew patches onto Biker's vests and zippers into jackets. The only hard leather they sew are phone cases and wallets, both of which are under 1/8 inch thick. You may want to use machines like those to sew 3/8 of an inch with #138 thread. So, my usage would be misleading as to the capabilities of those machines.

I have a friend who sews rifle slings and guitar straps on a Cobra Class 4. He only uses #138 and #207 thread and the average thickness along the edges is 1/8 inch. This in no way describes the capacity of that machine, which easily sews 3/4 inch with much heavier thread.

It might make more sense to ask members what machines and thread/needle combinations do you use to sew wallets | phone cases | knife sheathes | holsters | belts | chaps | vests, upholstery leather, etc.

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Thanks wiz, but thoughts are more on the type of machine they manage on rather than how they use it, people could easily ask specific data direct if required, just thought simpler to see what people use rather than hundreds of "Is this machine any good"

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I learned on a Pro-2000 but currently used at my work ( tack repair) a Ferdinand 900b set up with 207/277 poly. I have in my own shop at home two Ferdinand 900b one set up for 138/207 and the other with 207/277 all the machines have clutch motors. I also have a Juki DNU1541 which I put a servo and speed reducer on a year ago. I love the fact that it will crawl. Most of my work is tack repair.

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I sew mostly small goods I have a Juki 1541s for leather, Juki HZL-400 for linings and just picked up a Singer 241-12 because it was in mint condition and was only $75. My next machine is going to be a cylinder hopefully a Juki. I love how well built they are and parts are easy to get.

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I have a half-dozen industrial machines for various leather purposes but the one I use the most is a Wimsew 0618. It's nothing special -- a locally badged Chinese upholstery-weight triple-feed flat-bed machine. It's on a cheap table top, vintage Singer K-legs and powered by a rather crappy servo motor with needle positioner. An unremarkable modern machine that can do TKT20 (v138) thread all day, and TKT13 (v207) sometimes. It won't do 8mm of bridle reliably but it will run like the clappers through a quarter inch of softer leather.

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I tried this topic awhile back and it went a little haywire. 

On the topic, I get to pick up a consew 206rb-1 with a new table and servo on Wednesday. Yeeeeehaaaaaaawwwww:)

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7 minutes ago, bikermutt07 said:

Yeeeeehaaaaaaawwwww

Congrats  :rockon:@bikermutt07

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Will this be a new skill to learn,

Darn things sew a 100% straight line when you practice, then have a mind of there own when on your good item

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I recently picked up a TECHSew 2750, and its proved very versatile. It’s has sufficient attachment and options that it will satisfy a variety of projects

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Okay, I'll join the foray.

I currently have the following machines, some of which are used every day and others less frequently.

  • Cowboy CB4500 (w/accessory pack). Used daily to sew everything from thick belts to holsters and other bulky items.
  • Singer 139w109, a long body walking foot machine used daily to sew thinner goods with #92 thread. Used for patches on vests that are not over a pocket.
  • Singer 111w103, a standard body walking foot machine that we bought out of a customer's car. It is a backup machine threaded with #69 thread. Used for thinnest leather jobs.
  • Singer 42-5, a spring foot machine from the Roaring 20s. I use it occasionally to hem chaps, close the bottom of jackets and vests and some upholstery jobs.
  • Singer 29k71, a small bobbin, short arm patcher on a treadle stand. Used almost daily to sew patches over pockets, repair purses and bags, go over loose threads on wallet interiors, etc. It is only used with #69 thread to minimize wear.
  • Adler 30-7 patcher. This is a high lift, big bobbin patch machine on a motorized base. It is usually threaded with #92 thread, but occasionally I load 138 into it for heavier jobs. This is a go to repairs machine that is also used to sew cylindrical objects (e.d., dice cups).
  • Singer 168G101, a 7" post machine with compound feed walking feet. It uses the same feet, bobbins and needles as the Singer 111w103. I use it to repair hats, to sew embroidered patches onto hats and to sew along the bottom of bags. It is usually threaded with #138 thread, but can handle #207 flawlessly (it was preset for 207).
  • Singer 31-15, a bottom feed tailoring machine from the Roaring 20s. I thread it with #69 bonded, or standard cotton or poly-core garment thread. I use it to sew linings for vests and jackets, and to sew cloth projects. Rarely used, it shares the table with the 111w103. I have all manner of accessory feet and folders for this machine.
  • Pfaff 4 thread, 2 needle serger. Used rarely to close and protect edges of linings, denim and other cloth that tends to run. Indispensable in a sewing room.
  • Consew blind stitch machine. Used rarely on cloth pants and skirts for taking up and re-hemming.

I should mention that my Dad was a tailor all his life and taught me to sew on his Singer 31-15, which he bought new from Singer in the 1920s or 30s.

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5 hours ago, chrisash said:

Will this be a new skill to learn,

Darn things sew a 100% straight line when you practice, then have a mind of there own when on your good item

"They all sew scrap!"  Quote from the best heavy stitcher mechanic I know.

Well, I guess since I am a machine and tool hoarder, I want to play too.  My list of current machines, most of which WILL sew, but not necessarily used every day:

  • Landis One (x 4):   Yes I like these machines, possibly because it was the first heavy stitcher that I purchased when starting out that would actually do what the seller claimed it would do.  Used one exclusively for my first 15 years in business. Vintage (early 1900's) stitcher for heavy harness and saddlery items, I have used down to a 207 and sewed 9 to the inch, but overall they do best with a 277 or 346 and 5-8 spi.  Threaded needle machine.  Will sew close to an an inch thick
  • Landis 3: Haven't used it much yet, was gifted to me by a dear friend when he found out he was terminally ill.  I had tried to buy if off him for years.  Used for much the same as above machine. Hook and Awl machine, vintage, again early 1900's, but not as early as the Landis Ones.  Will sew 3/4"
  • Landis 16: Another hook and awl machine, came along after the Landis 3's, although I believe they were in production at the same time for a while(?). Completely different type of machine than the 3, even though it is a hook and awl.  Used for heavy work also. Will sew 3/4" +.
  • Randall:  similar in style to the Landis 3, but preceded the 3 in production.  I believe the Randall and Campbell machines were in production before the turn of the century.  Hook and awl, more suited to finer work than the previously mentioned machines, 3/4" is absolutely maxxing this machine out, unless it is a High-lift model.  The stitch made by this type of machine has never been duplicated.  Cadillac of heavy stitchers. 
  • Union Lockstitch:  Another heavy hook and awl stitcher, more of a high speed production machine.  Sews 3/4" . Finicky and fickle, I don't even attempt to sew smaller projects.  I need to have at least a set of 4 harness tugs to sew before I'll fire this one up.
  • American Straight Needle: Intended as a machine for side seaming cowboy boots, it was marketed as able to also stitch soles and do harness work.  It is a compromise at best for harness work, having a narrow 4" throat.  Smooth running machine that will throw a pretty nice stitch when everything is right. 
  • Cowboy 4500:  Enough has been said about these that I don't need to be redundant.  Versatile machine, but you know what they say about a Jack of all trades!  I bought it specifically to sew Biothane harness.  Beyond that, although I use it often, I could get along without it if working only with leather.
  • Ferdinand Bull 900: Came in a shop buyout, sure glad I didn't buy a new one back in '91 when I was starting out.  Threaded needle, heavy stitcher, doesn't even come close to being the machine the vintage heavy stitchers are.
  • Juki LU-563: Flatbed light stitcher, 3/8" max lift, run 138 or lighter thread, although I have run 207. 
  • Patch machine: not even sure of make or model because it had been repainted and no decals when I bought it.  Sews good, but I have limited use for it.  Came in a package deal
  • Singer 29-4 Patch machine:  doesn't sew for more than 5 or 6 stitches.  Came in another package deal, otherwise would never have gone out looking for one of these.
  • American Curve Needle: Hook and awl, for sewing soles on boots.  I don't build boots, came in another buyout.
  • Landis Curve Needle: Ditto of American Curve Needle. 

I think that's all of them.

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I have a well used Tippmann Boss that I sew holsters and belts with.  I have not convinced the finance committee(wife) that I really need a Cowboy 4500 for my hobby but I am still trying.

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2 hours ago, dikman said:

Wiz, that Singer 168G101 sounds really interesting.

Indeed! It is unlike most other post machines I have had. It may have been transported here through the Stargate.

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I jump in also

  • Cobra 4 (x2) My main work horses. I have one set up for sewing heavy latigo items about 1/2" thick. The other I use for sewing foam and Kydex to leather..lighter duty stuff.
  • Consew 229R-1 Post bed...bag duty
  • Consew 206rb-1 Medium duty. Most of what I do with this is max 8-10 ounce oil tanned leather
  • Singer 112W116 double needle. Decorative double stitch lines on belts, bag lids, etc
  • Singer 29K31 Patcher goes on location to rallies/shows for sewing on patches
  • Adler 30-7 Patcher, same as above and sewing lengthwise across the bottom of tool roll bags
  • Juki DLN 5410 non leather medium fabric work that requires higher speed
  • Junker & Ruh sd28 bought it to sit on a shelf and look cool but it actually works and I've stitched some soles with it
  • Landis One  newest addition. Just picked it up in working order. Had been sitting collecting dust for 50 years. Restoration coming this winter. Another one that I purchased for the cool factor but after cleaning it up and lubing it up, I ran a line of stitching down some 10 ounce latigo using the old twine that it was still threaded with. I produces an incredibly nice tight stitch. I will be adapting it to sew with threads in the 207 to 346 range

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17 hours ago, bikermutt07 said:

On the topic, I get to pick up a consew 206rb-1 with a new table and servo on Wednesday. Yeeeeehaaaaaaawwwww:)

That’s cool!  

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Listed in my signature, used for canvas, 5mm vegtan single thickness and 4mm chrome tan x3 thicknesses Protex TY-8B (227R copy).

Singer 31K-20 with clutch motor, used infrequently.

Singer 201P, used very rarely for canvas or tarpaulin work.

Kennedy (Singer 201 copy) never used.

Singer 66K-16... waiting for repair and renovation ...

Edited by Rockoboy

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I just got a Singer 29-4 pedal machine this last Saturday! :)

It’s a beast and I’m really looking forward to cleaning it up to work on it. 

Can you tell me what I can use to unfreeze it? WD-40? Sewing machine oil? The stuff that deoxidises rusted metal?

It’s not really badly frozen, it just doesn’t want to move a lot. I can get it to complete a circle, I just have to move slowly and carefully. No noises, scary or otherwise that I noticed. Just had my hearing checked, so it should be okay...

What can I use to repaint the decorations on it once I get it in working order?

Where can I go for info about it?

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1 hour ago, ScoobyNewbie said:

I just got a Singer 29-4 pedal machine this last Saturday! :)

It’s a beast and I’m really looking forward to cleaning it up to work on it. 

Can you tell me what I can use to unfreeze it? WD-40? Sewing machine oil? The stuff that deoxidises rusted metal?

It’s not really badly frozen, it just doesn’t want to move a lot. I can get it to complete a circle, I just have to move slowly and carefully. No noises, scary or otherwise that I noticed. Just had my hearing checked, so it should be okay...

What can I use to repaint the decorations on it once I get it in working order?

Where can I go for info about it?

 

 Orderd new decals here last year

https://www.singerdecals.com/

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I used the spray WD40 when i got mine to liberally coat all moving parts i could see and it freed up nice, but was not seazed up to start with, then used 3in1 as normall, I notice in the instructions it suggestd motor oil so i think normal sewing oil may be to thin for the old machines

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Update. I now have a 206rb-1 and a cowboy 3200. I think I am pretty set.:)

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