RockyAussie

How to make a watchband with edge coating tutorial

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I have had this watch band floating around here for awhile and thought it might be a good time to do a how to make, along with one of the methods I use when I only have a small job to edge coat. The original band was inset with some short hair skin of which I could find no suitable substitute so as the picture below shows I managed to talk her into using crocodile. At this stage I have cut out all of my patterns and pieces and for the backing and I have gone with some 2mm thick nubuck camel skin I think. The black matt croc is about 1.5mm in thickness. Although there is only 2 keepers needed I do show enough croc strips for 3 keepers and that is because I'm just not that good. If one stuffs up along the way I don't have to reset the skiver etc to make another.

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This pic below shows the embossing stamp I decided to use and how with a bent metal plate I use to hold the leather still in case I think it needs more stamp/heat time.

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This shows the other strap stamped and this case held down with a magnet instead.

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As the keepers have to have their edging done earlier than the rest of the strap I have to split them down to obtain a finished thickness around 1.2mm firstly. For the firm backing I am going for .5mm and have decided to do this on my Fortuna skiving machine. Below shows me setting the height on some scrap first.

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showing the backing strip running through

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and now the croc a little thicker at .7mm

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This one below shows the skiving done on the straps with the Fortuna and a little hand skiving to achieve no thickness on the ends. This is done to minimise getting any holes in the valleys.

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This is showing all the pieces ready to glue up and attach some reinforcing fabric for where the watch pins go. The one piece of fabric (front left) will be cut into 3 separate pieces as they are applied.

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Here I am applying contact glue with the aid of glue gun.

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It is best to attach the fabric in a rolling fashion over something a little larger than the watch pin. In this case I use a cotton bud stick.

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This one shows what it should look like with the fabric's attached and the croc keeper strips stuck down.

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That is about how many pics will load in one go so I will be back with more later.

 

 

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Now I mark out where the backing has to be attached to the crocodile.

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This is then scratched up to be sure of good glue adhesion.

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Followed by gluing up the pieces

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After the strips are attached I like to get the crew punch hole cut and ready for edging

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The keeper strips are now second cut to the correct width to be edged together with the crew punch.

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Note that a stainless steel egg cup is used here.

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Now I mark out where I want the stitches to start and stop on the backing connection.

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A light scribe line could then be applied if wanted.

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Back soon -

 

 

Edited by RockyAussie
Pictures went out of order

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Next step is to stitch the connection

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Then pull the threads through to the back, glue them then tie a knot to keep them firmly held

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Next step is gluing up and I have run a graphite lead pencil all in the middle to help the pins slide in later if it gets too tight.

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Here they are now attached except for the backing near the buckle end. This is where I want to put in the first keeper later on.

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To make the second cutting easier I like to glue up my cardboard patterns and let it tak (dry) off for a while. this helps to stop any moving around as I cut.

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As you can see it helps

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Now the holes get marked with a hole punch

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Note: that the holes are only marked as yet. This is because going through the cardboard pattern and the strap ruins the cardboard pattern.

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Now the holes can be punched out.

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Sanding and edging will follow tomorrow 

 

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Another great how-to article Brian - thanks for taking the time to document the steps and sharing with us!

Gary

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The finesse and attention to detail leaves me gobsmacked!

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Thanks for the comments Gary and Brian:).

I just thought I would throw this picture in to show how well the tack coat can help when second cutting. Most leather are Ok with this but some oil tans can leave little blotchy marks but they normally rub out alright.

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Now I like to use a fast speed Multi Tool sander with some fine 180 grit belt for this sort of job. You can use a fine grit sanding block as well it just takes a lot longer. This shows the machine and how I have made up an extraction cowl with some Perspex and a piano hinge to assist with the dust.

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This is the angle I would hold it on while taking a bevel off of the edges.

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It should start to look like this after sanding

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A little heat carefully applied with a heat gun takes care of some of the fuzzy fibres

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Now I do a check and make sure it is going to fit into the watch and buckle and leave a little room for the edge paint.

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Now after giving the keepers another coat I start applying the edging along the straps. This requires a steady hand and should be lightly touched on NOT push and dragged on. The first coat should be kept fairly light and seals off and goes dry quickly. In this case I followed with a second light coat after about 5 minutes.

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As you can see from the back the edging is a bit drunken sailor but the ironing will give that a straighter appearance later.

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Once dry this is what the edging looks like prior to ironing. You could sand it and re edge coat and sand it again as well instead of ironing if needed.

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Back soon -

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you OK now it is time to iron in the rough edges. I do this with the help of a 60 watt soldering iron that I have shaped the tip into a curved shape. This iron is temperature controlled by a light dimmer switch which I have been using this way for many years now. I use a piece of box channel hollowed out on one end to hold the iron in between steps. A magnifying viewer with a light helps to check and spread a bit of light as well.

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Here I am pushing the iron away from me and sliding it along the edge

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Now the same is applied to the other side of the same edge

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If there is any trouble getting the centre down smooth you can also use the edge of the iron as shown

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A quick check under the magnifier shows its good enough for a finish coat

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At this stage I decided to get the fixed keeper joined up

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I position the other band on top and determine the length needed

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A sharp knife is needed for a good skive

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The keeper is now contact glued up with the help of my spiky glue pot

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and now it is pushed down over the top at this stage

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Next step will be how I do the finish edging

 

 

 

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Amazed by the number of steps and the time it must take to make such a perfect item

Unfortunately I am restrained from trying to copy as I dont have the stainless steel egg cup :lol:

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1 hour ago, chrisash said:

Amazed by the number of steps and the time it must take to make such a perfect item

Yeah ...I'm starting to get amazed myself....might have to throw this egg cup up your way.:P

Again with the egg cup I give it 1 or 2 more coats and let that dry for a few hours

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Sometimes after drying they still may need some extra work. This pic below shows the edges are still a bit split line looking

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This is now tackled with some very fine sandpaper and light rubbing with the grey Scotchbrite

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Now it looks smooth but quite dull

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The next step is to apply some of this HooCo wax

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This I do on a finishing machine with a soft horse hair brush

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I also like to give the top a good polish at this stage as that helps to avoid glue sticking to the needle when I stitch the bands

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This picture shows the difference between a polished edge and one that is not.

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Now it is time to place the keeper into place and I have sanded it all to make sure the glue holds it all in well.

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Here shown it is glued and ready to stick down

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Now it is ready to set up for the stitching

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Time for a coffee - :coffeecomp:

 

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Nice tute.

Is that an oil can you use as a glue pot & applicator?

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Same principle , it one of those things left over from my shoe making/repairing days. This link shows more info that may be of use to you -https://www.ebay.co.uk/p/5-X-Kabi-Gluemaster-KA25B17-Patented-Brush-Oil-Can-Brass-Pump/28023986721

The one I call spiky is my own idea where I have pulled apart an old worn out brush and inserted a brass tube into the supply hole.

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To get the stitching right I have to mark out where I want the start and stop holes to be. This I do with a sharp ended spike as below

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If you look carefully you should see where I have poked holes right the way through. This is so from the top side I can see where to stitch to and from

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As I am an expert at going crooked when doing this I have put a scribe line across to follow

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Now as I ALWAYS do I do a test to get the tension and stitch length where they should be.

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Not perfect but its Ok with a slightly blurry camera

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Now we have to clean up all of the threads

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This I do with a little dab of wood glue and a cup head bolt that I have sharpened to a point that has the end a little squared off

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After cutting the threads back I put a dab of glue down to poke the spike into.

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As the glue tacks off I push the spike down into the hole and check for any overrun.

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Well ...thats about it. I will post some pictures when I finish polishing and putting it together.

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Well its done... The first 2 are from my crappy old camera which I have to now take 3 shots to maybe get one in focus and the others are done by my wife's camera in a light box. I am not allowed to touch it.....:thinking:

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This is one job where I wish I had smaller hands and fingers

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That is all for now ....next one will be a phone pouch I think.

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Great work and very detailed, useful and informative tutorial. Many thanks for shared!

Edited by ABHandmade

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Thanks for taking all the time to do this, it is very helpful and easy to follow!

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Thanks for taking the time to post such a detailed tutorial Rocky.

Your work is awesome and highly detailed.

While I won't be making a watch band for awhile, I have learnt something from your edging section that I will put into practice. So thanks for that.

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thank you for posting all this great information.

 

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2 hours ago, ABHandmade said:

Great work and very detailed, useful and informative tutorial. Many thanks for shared!

Thanks you , I think compared to your work it will pale:wub: and I think many here  will get to see and appreciate this from you.

2 hours ago, JD62 said:

it is very helpful and easy to follow!

Thanks I am glad to hear that:thumbsup:

2 hours ago, noobleather said:

I have learnt something from your edging section that I will put into practice. So thanks for that

That was my main goal and I will do some more using some machinery in the near future. I have to do a couple of hundred 3/4" belt in a whole range of coloured edging sometime this month in case you might want to follow me for a bit.

1 hour ago, Scoutmom103 said:

thank you for posting all this great information.

 

Hey ....would I post anything but....:huh:???

I would like to thank all of the people that follow me for their patience and all of the notifications they must have gotten while I multi posted into this post.

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@RockyAussie

Sir, while I study, you teach and help others, with the full moral right to do so, taking into account your highest skill (and no less magnificent ability to show the process in detail and in very accessible form). Thank you!

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Wow, the detail is amazing. I learned a lot from your post as well. Very nice work, thanks for sharing.

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4 hours ago, Bluzoom said:

Wow, the detail is amazing. I learned a lot from your post as well. Very nice work, thanks for sharing.

@Bluzoom thanks Dwight, I am working on some belt making stuff you may find useful for you so keep checking :taptap:or follow me.

 

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On 6/11/2019 at 5:54 AM, RockyAussie said:

Next step is to stitch the connection

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I just used this technique to attach the liner on part of the pet collar I made.  Fantastic tutorial, thanks so much for sharing!  I know it takes a lot of effort to put something like this together, truly appreciate it.

YinTx

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