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Danne

Recommend a tool you like that is not mainly used for leathercraft

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I start with a recommendation. 

Small silicone brushes. I use them both with waterbased and solvent based glues. I haven't used them a lot yet so can't answer how they will hold up against solvent based glue. But I usually wipe them off directly after I have applied glue.

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Nice thread @Danne.

I had been giving thought to using a magic marker to apply color to my edges, but felt the available colors too limiting. Plus, I wondered if the water based colors used in magic markers might not hold up over time. Then, while visiting an art store, I found these refillable markers which can be used with any alcohol based dyes. Have been very happy with the results.

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5 minutes ago, LatigoAmigo said:

Nice thread @Danne.

I had been giving thought to using a magic marker to apply color to my edges, but felt the available colors too limiting. Plus, I wondered if the water based colors used in magic markers might not hold up over time. Then, while visiting an art store, I found these refillable markers which can be used with any alcohol based dyes. Have been very happy with the results.

41F9WW7t7fL._AC_SL1000_.jpg

That seems like an awesome solution. 

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"Recommend a tool you like that is not mainly used for leathercraft" 

I use large 5mm square or ' O' rings instead of a bone folder to mold cases etc. I use the  curved wood handles on my  bevellers  instead of a slicker  to burnish ( ideal for tight curves & corners, holes etc. ) 

I use an old dried out  biro  or the tip of a pencil , dipped in dye for intricate details, instead of a brush. 

I use Q tips ( ear buds) for gluing  small  leather items, detailed parts etc.  .  They're disposable and cheap as . 

Does that count? 

HS

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I use wooden Golf tees for burnishing buckle tongue slots had the same ones for 25 years, also use a ski/snowboard scraper to help finish some edges to hide the join on some pieces of work cost £4.

JCUK

Edited by jcuk

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I use popsicle sticks for spreading glue!  B)

I also use a dried up ball point pen for transferring patterns from tracing paper to leather. Handstitched, that's what you call a Biro, right?

Edited by Sheilajeanne

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Probably the most useful tool in the shop was always a bench-top drill press. Used as a drill to remove broken snaps or rivets. Various size drum sanders for edge dressing. Chuck in a hard felt polishing bob for edge burnishing. I can't think of a single tool that did so many things or was used more often.

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16 hours ago, Sheilajeanne said:

use popsicle sticks for spreading glue!  B)

I also use a dried up ball point pen for transferring patterns from tracing paper to leather. Handstitched, that's what you call a Biro, right?

Yep, spot on  .  I like the popsicle stick idea . :) 

HS

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Lobo, wish I had a drill press!  Have tried using a regular drill for burnishing - didn't work very well!

If I were handier with woodworking, I'd likely be able to make a stand for the drill, and that would make things easier.

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I use fired rifle brass for punches. When they get dull or bent I toss them and get another. .223 best for Chicago screws. 

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toothbrush handle for molding holsters.  

Drill press gets lots of use.  Biggest one is probably chucking an awl in there and pre punching holes to hand stitch.  

Heat gun to dry glue and apply wax.

I use scrap leather to spread glue.

I use a 1" punch and a smaller punch for the center of the leather washers I make from scrap.  I use a lot for IWB holsters.  

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17 hours ago, Sheilajeanne said:

Lobo, wish I had a drill press!  Have tried using a regular drill for burnishing - didn't work very well!

I had an idea of using an old sewing machine motor, fitted with a wood slicker  and with a pedal  as a burnisher .  I keep checking S/H markets etc for old machine motors. However, I do have some old motors  in one of my sheds, with shafts on either side, that ran fans in  old tape or drum  drive computers ' back in the day'   that would be ideal for  burnishers ....I just need to find them....they're in a box in one of my sheds....somewhere   :dunno:  

HS

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The most used thing in my leatherworking / woodworking shop is bbq skewers (up the top in the photo).  I always make sure to have dozens.

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You know sometimes when you drill a hole in wood, and the hole is a couple of mm from when you wanted it to be?  and when you try to drill in the correct spot, your drill bit keeps falling in the existing hole?  The only solution is to stick a BBQ skewer in the hole, break it, and there you go, the hole is filled and you can drill wherever you want.

Other than that I use them to mix and stir things like paint or 2 part epoxy or my favourite carnauba cream and dye mix, to apply or clean glue, to poke and mark things like an awl, to reach in tight places where my fingers can't go, and I also  use them as spacers, shims, tweezers, toothpicks, pointers, measuring sticks, rulers, chopsticks and backscratchers :D

They're basically an extension of my fingers at this point, the only thing I've never used them as is actual BBQ skewers :P

 

Edited by Spyros

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My biggest one is a sublimation press:  I get lots of wrinkled upholstery scrap and it's great to iron the suede side and get stuff to lay flat.   Totally vital for anything that has to get embossed. 

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On 11/29/2020 at 12:14 PM, Danne said:

That seems like an awesome solution. 

I use these as well and yes, they are awesome!

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Someone on here a while ago mentioned liking the Swann Morton scalpel, I picked one up and definitely agree. It’s an oddly comfortable handle and works well for tiny curves and detail cutting.

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I have an oscillating sander that gets a lot of use. It will run with a 24 inch belt or drums up to 2 inches in diameter.  I made a little dust collection system that picks the dust up as it comes off the belt or drum that goes into a shop vac. And while on vacuums, I bought one of those little rechargeable hand held vacuums that gets more use than I thought it would. It's great for keeping my work surfaces dust and debris free.

I bought a cheap variable speed bench grinder with plans to use it as a burnisher. It was sold to me as a half inch shaft with 7/16 threads. Turns out it's actually threaded to 12mm which doesn't work with what I had planned. The vendor won't take a return so I use it with soft buffing wheels for my cutting edges. Works great.

Regards,

Arturo

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