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Cascabel

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Everything posted by Cascabel

  1. The metal staple thingy is called a "hog ring", commonly used in upholstering automobile seats. If you stopped by an auto upholstery shop, I think they would probably give you a few for free.
  2. If you prefer not to remove the head, just lay the whole thing down on the floor of the truck. If it's already lying down, it can't fall over and get damaged. Machines are quite top-heavy and can fall easily in turns. Tie the head down so that it cannot swing out on it's hinges.
  3. I have the Cowboy 4500, and the pedestal can be lowered quite a bit. I use a standard type office swivel chair with mine to work comfortably. I hate trying to work standing up !!
  4. Singer has always used their own proprietary thread sizes on their screws. No standard screws will fit. I have made a few as needed with my lathe. Some of them are close to standard sizes, and most are not. It becomes a problem with an older machine that is no longer shown in the catalogs. You are then forced to find somebody that can make what you need, or drill oversize and tap to a standard thread. Depending on where you live, you can sometimes find a dealer that keeps older machines on hand, and can cannibalize what you need from his junk pile.
  5. When I got my new Cowboy machine, I found the stand to be too high. I had no intention of operating it standing up, so I dropped it down to the lowest point. It was easy to do by loosening the bolts. I did it BEFORE mounting the machine on it, and it was an easy one-man job. If you have already mounted your machine, I suggest removing it first, and then lowering the stand, and remounting it. It is now about the same height as my other machines, and I can operate it sitting down.
  6. . Always bear in mind that there is no such thing as an "Industrial Strength" machine, and just because it is made of cast iron, and painted black does not make it a real industrial machine. Many of them are Grandma's old sewing machine that showed up at a yard sale. EBAY and Craigslist sellers lie !! The old domestic machines are excellent within their limitations, but none of them are real "Leather" or "Industrial" machines. A simple way to tell is that if the motor is the size of a man's fist, and attached to the back of the machine, it is a domestic machine. Real industrial machines have a motor the about the size of your head mounted underneath the table. And real industrial machines are NEVER designed to fold down into the cabinet like a domestic. They are much too heavy !! Another consideration is that the thickness a machine can handle is dictated by the fact that MOST, but NOT ALL machines release the thread tension as the foot rises either by the thickness of the material being sewn, or when climbing over a thick section like a seam. This can cause skipped stitches and a host of other problems, such as tangles on the back side. This applies to both domestic and industrial models. This is a feature of the design of most machines, allowing easy removal of the work from under the foot when raising the foot manually when done sewing. Some machines, like my Singer 42-5 can sew as much thickness as you can jam under the foot, as it does not have this tension release feature.
  7. Check with Southeast Sewing Products, 228 Otley Dr.; Atlanta. I have dealt with them before. (a long time ago) They were very helpful. They have obsolete parts available. (800) 426-2246 If it is stuck, most likely something is jamming it, like a piece of broken needle or something similar. If that is the case all the "magic" lubricants in the world won't help. Don't force it !!
  8. Depending on where you live, you may be able to find a dealer that has been in business for many years. Many of them have a store room full of old and obsolete machines that they keep on hand for parts. Many of the old machines have the large wheels which can be adapted to other machines. I was able to pick up a wheel from an old Singer model 29 inexpensively from a dealer in Atlanta. With a little lathe work, I adapted it to a newer machine. If you find a wheel, check the shaft size, it may already be suitable for your 31-15.
  9. While you are putting things right, be aware that Singer did NOT use standard threads on their machines, so hardware store screws and nuts will not work. They had their own proprietary threads on their hardware. You will need to get screws, etc. from dealers in Singer parts, or have them custom made.
  10. Sherwin-Williams has a paint called "Dimenso" that works nicely and gives a "hammer" finish. You may need to get your local Sherwin-Williams store to order it for you after you convince the clerk that it exists !! They mostly deal in interior and exterior house paint in their retail stores. It works very well, and as I recall does not require a primer, you just need to be sure the surface is really CLEAN, and wipe it down with an evaporating solvent like lacquer thinner before painting. Dimenso does not require thinning, and is to be sprayed right out of the can, assuming you have access to a spray gun and air compressor.
  11. Get a short screwdriver that uses 1/4 inch replaceable tips. Choose a tip that is a PERFECT fit in the slot, or grind a little to get a PERFECT fit. Use the screwdriver handle to exert STRONG downward pressure, and turn it using a 1/4 inch wrench directly on the tip. That usually works for me. If you have already boogered up the slot, then all bets are off !!
  12. Words of wisdom, so pay attention !!
  13. I think what you are asking about is called a Reeves Drive. My metal lathe has one. It works quite well, but I'm not sure it would be suitable for a sewing machine.
  14. I'm arriving a bit late to the party, but I thought I would chime in on this subject. . Always bear in mind that there is no such thing as an "Industrial Strength" machine, and just because it is made of cast iron, and painted black does not make it a real industrial machine. Many of them are Grandma's old sewing machine that showed up at a yard sale. EBAY and Craigslist sellers lie !! The old domestic machines are excellent within their limitations, but none of them are real "Leather" or "Industrial" machines. A simple way to tell is that if the motor is the size of a man's fist, and attached to the back of the machine, it is a domestic machine. Real industrial machines have a motor the about the size of your head mounted underneath the table. And real industrial machines are NEVER designed to fold down into the cabinet like a domestic. They are much too heavy !! Another consideration is that the thickness a machine can handle is dictated by the fact that MOST, but NOT ALL machines release the thread tension as the foot rises either by the thickness of the material being sewn, or when climbing over a thick section like a seam. This can cause skipped stitches and a host of other problems, such as tangles on the back side. This applies to both domestic and industrial models. This is a feature of the design of most machines, allowing easy removal of the work from under the foot when raising the foot manually when done sewing. Some machines, like my Singer 42-5 can sew as much thickness as you can jam under the foot, as it does not have this tension release feature.
  15. I just stick my finger between the spokes on the wheel on my 29-4, and spin it that way. Mine turns quite easily, because it's well oiled. Never saw the need for a hand crank on it. Mine has a treadle, but I never use it.
  16. I was not aware that they currently have a brake built in to the motor !! Mine does not have that feature.
  17. The hand wheel should turn quite easily. Look for something causing a drag on it. When the wheel is installed, there should be a small amount of clearance between it and thrust washer on the machine head.
  18. Always bear in mind that there is no such thing as an "Industrial Strength" machine, and just because it is made of cast iron, and painted black does not make it a real industrial machine. Many of them are Grandma's old sewing machine that showed up at a yard sale. EBAY and Craigslist sellers lie !! The old domestic machines are excellent within their limitations, but none of them are real "Leather" or "Industrial" machines. A simple way to tell is that if the motor is the size of a man's fist, and attached to the back of the machine, it is a domestic machine. Real industrial machines have a motor the about the size of your head mounted underneath the table. And real industrial machines are NEVER designed to fold down into the cabinet like a domestic. They are much too heavy !! Another consideration is that the thickness a machine can handle is dictated by the fact that MOST, but NOT ALL machines release the thread tension as the foot rises either by the thickness of the material being sewn, or when climbing over a thick section like a seam. This can cause skipped stitches and a host of other problems, such as tangles on the back side. This applies to both domestic and industrial models. This is a feature of the design of most machines, allowing easy removal of the work from under the foot when raising the foot manually when done sewing. Some machines, like my Singer 42-5 can sew as much thickness as you can jam under the foot, as it does not have this tension release feature.
  19. Always bear in mind that there is no such thing as an "Industrial Strength" machine, and just because it is made of cast iron, and painted black does not make it a real industrial machine. Many of them are Grandma's old sewing machine that showed up at a yard sale. EBAY and Craigslist sellers lie !! The old domestic machines are excellent within their limitations, but none of them are real "Leather" or "Industrial" machines. A simple way to tell is that if the motor is the size of a man's fist, and attached to the back of the machine, it is a domestic machine. Real industrial machines have a motor the about the size of your head mounted underneath the table. And real industrial machines are NEVER designed to fold down into the cabinet like a domestic. They are much too heavy !! Another consideration is that the thickness a machine can handle is dictated by the fact that MOST, but NOT ALL machines release the thread tension as the foot rises either by the thickness of the material being sewn, or when climbing over a thick section like a seam. This can cause skipped stitches and a host of other problems, such as tangles on the back side. This applies to both domestic and industrial models. This is a feature of the design of most machines, allowing easy removal of the work from under the foot when raising the foot manually when done sewing. Some machines, like my Singer 42-5 can sew as much thickness as you can jam under the foot, as it does not have this tension release feature.
  20. If you are moving it yourself, and either can't or don't want to remove the head and pack it separately, (which is the best way), lay it down in the trailer or truck, rather than haul it standing up. These things are pretty top-heavy. If it is already laying down, it can't fall over and be damaged !!
  21. Back when I worked for the airlines, just for fun we made up a test sample using passenger seat belt components to do an experiment with a tester used for testing the pull strength of cable assemblies. Passenger seat belt webbing is identical to automotive seat belt material. Surprisingly, the metal fittings broke before the webbing did. I don't remember the exact tension that we went to, but it was well over 10,000 pounds when it failed. We used a standard passenger buckle and end fittings in the experiment. Webbing is amazingly strong !!
  22. I have always felt that some things should NOT be made of aluminum !! It is not strong enough for some applications.
  23. Interesting !!! I had not noticed the needlebar thread guide on my 4500, and had not been using it. Never seemed to cause a problem at all. I will use it the next time I sew something on the machine and see if it makes any difference one way or the other.
  24. My personal cure for that problem is to apply a suitable amount of pressure on the hand wheel with my right hand, sort of like a brake to slow things down, if need be. It helps a lot to have a huge wheel on the machine, and a small pulley on the motor, like what I have on my 42-5. Very easy to control that way
  25. I suggest after removing the head, remove any thread stand, lights or other parts from the top of the table, then turn it upside down, and slide it down the stairs on it's top. Just get in front of it, and let gravity do the work. Easy one-man job that way !!
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