imstephenjones

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    54
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About imstephenjones

  • Rank
    Member

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    www.stephenjones.us

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Tacoma, WA
  • Interests
    Leather, Whiskey, Rock & Roll

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Basics
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    Google

Recent Profile Visitors

1,986 profile views
  1. Campbell-Randall VSB - $450

    Sold
  2. Self Centering Belt Punch - $350

    Sold!
  3. Campbell-Randall VSB - $450

    Selling a Campbell-Randall VSB machine. Will send the four wheels I have, as well as a brick of beeswax. It is in perfect working condition.
  4. Self Centering Belt Punch - $350

    Selling a self centering belt punch made by Byler's Custom Leather Machinery. Throwing in the belt dies as well. $350 via Square Cash and it is yours. I will cover shipping.
  5. Cobra 10 Ton Clicker

    Bought in September. Closed business needing this machine, so selling it to one lucky person who needs it! Images here: https://seattle.craigslist.org/tac/art/6091352456.html220 V Single Phase29.5″ x 15.75″ Cutting Space3/4″ Nylon Cutting BoardRotating HeadDead Man Switch System1.5 KW ( 2 H.P.) MotorCutting Speed: 0.08 m/sRange of Stroke: 5-75 mm (1/4″ - 3″)#46 Hydraulic OilElectronic Control SystemEura Drive Inverter Box W/Speed Control
  6. Clicker wanted

    Pneumatic was less powerful, even at a higher ton rating. Hydraulic has been amazing. I haven't had to do any maintenance. Hoping I won't, haha.
  7. Clicker wanted

    You bet! I picked up a cobra 10 tons clicker. http://www.zackwhite.com/Cobra-10-Ton-Clicker--COB10_p_5465.html my bad on thinking it was a 15 ton. It's a great machine. I absolutely love it. I previously had the Tipmann 1500, which got the job done. But it isn't nearly as accurate as the Cobra machine. You had to do adjustments on the bottom of the machine (each corner had a set screw that adjusted the height for that area). It was a pain and I ended up selling that for $1500 and picking up the Cobra.
  8. Double Capped Snaps?

    I order as large as 1,000 units and as little as 100 units. The cost is really great. I did work with a company last summer that we used a one way snap for. Heres where they can get spendy - the dies. They have two price points for dies. $70 and $140/ piece. So for snaps I believe it's a hefty investment. I do know what you can manually set these of you don't have the cash to buy the dies. What I do is pierce the material with the side that has the two prongs. I then use an awl to poke two small holes in the side without the prongs. Then I press that piece onto the prong piece and tap them down with a tooling tool and a hammer. This is is what I do for the jean buttons I get from them because I don't use them in large production runs. Just samples for clients so far. They are worth the investment, though. So it's great to start with and then buy the dies when you can afford them. Move even just punched a 1/16" or 1/8" hole (just like the other style snaps) and installed them the same way as mentioned above. You MAY need a business license to get an account with them. I'm not 100% sure. Let me know if you pursue that so I can provide better info in the future.
  9. Double Capped Snaps?

    For sure. Shoot an email to Ed Kelly. He's the man when it comes to explaining their product. They are also insanely easy to work with. They have never mistreated me. I think it would be impossible for them to. I DM'd his email to you.
  10. Double Capped Snaps?

    I've used them in 8-10oz. I've never tested it's limit, since that's the thickest I use.
  11. Straight stitches slightly slanted

    My recommendation would be calling CH Holderby in Seattle and asking them. They know everything about sewing machines, needles, etc. I'm fortunate to live very close to it. Just be careful. They will chat your ear off and you may loose an hour. But you will learn a lot. I'd recommend getting the type of needle you need and find another source that has them. Ordering on a phone is just - outdated - and super slow.
  12. Clicker wanted

    Emily, buying used is always the best when it works. I personally buy used 90% of the time. I only buy new when I cannot find it used. I purchased a clicker press from a gal on this forum about 6 months ago. I paid $1800 for a 15 ton machine. The deals are out there. You just have to know where to find them. Google everything you can think of. Look on eBay. Check sold listings. Email the seller and ask if they have another. The hustle will get you what you need at a good price. If you want to buy new and spend an extra $4-6k, then you could do that. But I don't recommend it!
  13. Double Capped Snaps?

    If you haven't worked with YKK directly I would reach out to them. They make an SX series snap that you don't have to pre punch holes. It's amazing. And both sides look great. Give it a google!
  14. #104 Tubular Rivet Help

    I'm appalled at this customer service for a wholesale customer. Wholesale should be based on being a business and trying to make something of yourself. Not how much money you spend. I spend over $150,000 a year on materials and tools. Shouldn't you be fighting for my business instead of pushing people like me away with silly hurdles that make you appear uneasy to work with? Are his $100 not good enough for you? All you have to do is let him have his account and be a happy customer so he can tell his friends about how wonderful Weaver is. Now you've lost him. That's silly business. It's an interesting mindset in a technology driven world. Because now I'm here, pissed at Weaver for treating him this way. I really hope you and your staff rethink this strategy.
  15. PFAFF1445 Spec's

    I'm. It sure about the needle size to use for 138. I would think 20 would be a good fit. But I would pick up a pack of 21 and 22 just in case. I generally purchase every size, plus and minus 4 from 20 for my machines. It's a good feeling to always have a needle that works for the job. It's the worst when you have to track down a pack of needles because you don't have what you need.