dirkba

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About dirkba

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    Member

Profile Information

  • Location
    South Africa
  • Interests
    Leather projects, woodworking, hunting, outdoors and 4x4

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Bags and belts
  • Interested in learning about
    Forms and patterns
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    Surfing the web

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  1. I have made one (using webbing belt) similar to the army slings, but it is used with your arm going through the loop and set to assist you in shooting while standing. Your stability is achieved from the sling forming a tri angle with the rifle and your forearm pushing against the front stock. Check out "accu sling" for more options!
  2. Hi, I am no expert, but having read a few articles on this topic for a 1907 bayonet scabbard I want to make, the common technique used seems to be by using fine sandpaper on the leather. Applying rubbing alcohol, with a spray bottle, on damp leather will dry the leather out and give it a faded look. A wire brush will also help to distress the leather before you start applying any oil. I would apply the above to the leather before I START THE PROJECT AND ONCE THE PROJECT IS DONE you can focus on the areas that would normally take the most wear and tear. Good luck with the project
  3. If this is an Australian pepper tree stump its probably not the best choice for a stump...the wood is likely to crack no matter what you do. Walnut or eucalyptus wood makes a very nice stump! I would however try and force a metal hoop around the top and as it dries force the hoop down and let it settle at about 4 - 6 inches from the top. If the stump cracks the metal hoop will hold it together. Good luck with your project!
  4. Spending time with the grandchildren...priceless!! She must have a good tutor
  5. Whether you would have won or not is irrelevant...!! You completed this "master piece" - so you are a winner!! I wish my skills were that advanced. I like it a LOT!!
  6. Thanks fredk - I looked it up and was pleasantly surprised to see the original Gladstone bag was made by J G Beard...now for the co-incidence my surname is Baard. If translated to english means beard...don't know if there could be a connection here!! Wulfing look up this thread if you want to see how the bag was reconstructed. http://www.threadsmagazine.com/item/44990/how-to-make-a-fortuny-gladstone-bag-part-1/page/all It is really great looking, but seems a challenge!
  7. Hi Wulfing, It is called a doctor's bag and dates back to around 1910 - according to this website https://www.la-belle-epoque.net/english/e_bag_0007.htm
  8. What hide did you use...looks like springbok! Amazing piece of work!
  9. Don't know if this would help...or if this is the type you are referring to. I had to replace the handle on this one for a friend and took a few pictures for future reference. The most difficult to find is the hinge - they are expensive!!
  10. Hi Big Sioux, Thanks for the info and I am blown away...just could not imagine that check book covers still have a meaningful purpose - and for that I'll gladly "pay my way forward". Let me have you postal detail and I'll send you my prized African Buffalo hide check book cover (no longer used), when an acquaintance from Texas visits in March!
  11. hi, Just curious...who still uses check book covers in the electronic era?
  12. Well done ...it looks great!
  13. Guest Bex, I don't want to blow your bubble...but you may want to rethink using elephant for a laptop bag. Specially if you are going to carry it as a sling bag. I made my wife a bag a few years ago...ended up selling it as a shotgun shell bag. The leather was a bit harsh on her clothing. If you make it as a hand carry bag - no problem! Just my 2c
  14. Tony RV2 - I am with you on this statement! The currency is not in my favour nor is the thought of importing a head knife! So I decided to make my own from a circular saw blade. It is functional and works like a charm
  15. Good luck with ALL the stitching and lacing - you sure have a lot of guts. I have a similar vest, but used real thin leather that I was able to sew. For effect on the pockets I used small spring buck (female) horns and the "sides of the leather" which had rough edges. Don't lose steam...keep going! Once you wear it there is no looking back - just smiles