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About srtboise

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  1. My first thought when reading the original post was she wanted the interior separated into two large compartments instead of one huge compartment. With that in mind I was thinking one big piece running long ways from center end to center end. There are already stitch lines on the ends, just attach the divider at that stitch line? I also agree with the suggestion of adding a dedicated 'holster' to secure the 1911. I believe it is irresponsible to carry a loaded handgun loose in a bag. steve
  2. Here is one I found searching google for "archery glove pattern". I think this is what you are after, hope this helps. Steve
  3. Thanks so much for the replies! I subscribe to Nigel's YouTube channel and am surprised I missed his pricking iron review videos. I will spend some time looking over these new options. steve
  4. Are these a decent alternative to the more expensive pricking irons? Or are these strictly for cutting lacing slots? Thanks steve
  5. impressive work everyone is submitting. i can only strive to be as good. i have mine 95% done but my day job has been nuts this week and i'm not sure i will be able to get it done this month steve
  6. Widget, When you run out I of thread, tie it off along the edge of your piece. Not real tight but snug enough to maintain a bit of tension and to keep the loose ends from getting pulled the wrong way. Then, rather than back stitch, start the new thread couple stitches back from where you ended the first piece and then continue as you were. It is only noticeable if you know what, and where, to look for. If you are not specifically looking for it, it blends right in. I have not been doing this for long so if someone more experienced disagrees with me or has better advise then I respectfully defer to their knowledge. steve (Edit to clarify poorly worded sentence)
  7. OurJud, The stitches are not diagonal because of the diamond shaped awl, it is because two objects cannot be in the same space at the same time. Watch this video: At about the 6 min mark Nigel provides a great visual explanation. Although the diamond shape does help create the effect. With that said, I have tried a round awl and it is MUCH more difficult to punch the same size hole as with a diamond awl. I think that is the real reason for the shape. Douglas Tools sells really nice awl blades, their small blade might be the thing you are looking for. They are an advertiser on this sight, check the banner ads or here is a direct link: I also bought a smaller awl blade from a company in Japan that I really like. I can track down a link if you want. Good luck, steve
  8. I'm working on a project for my wife and she wanted a very specific theme tooled into an accent piece of leather. She wants a dragonfly on a flower. I have never tooled/carved leather before so here is my first attempt... This started as my first few test cuts with a swivel knife and it evolved into this. This is completely free hand, no pattern was used. This is my first try at a flower. I used a pattern I found online that I modified slightly. Here is my first attempt at the entire theme. I thought it was going rather well until I overworked the dragonfly's head and lost too much detail. I am calling this another practice piece. I would love some feedback and criticism as I would like to learn from those more experienced than myself. Thanks steve
  9. I'm actually almost done stitching another quiver. Will apply some neatsfoot oil before final finish. steve
  10. Thanks Bigfoot, I am happy with it as a first attempt. The finish is Eco-Flo Satin Shene at the advice of the guy at my local Tandy store. steve
  11. Thanks for the comments. It's actually neatsfoot oil that darkened the tread, all the images without the gun show the stitching before wet molding and you can see the stitching is not stained at all. Thanks steve
  12. Thanks for sharing, Eric. That is very encouraging. I plan to order from Springfield as soon as it is in my budget, no more Tandy for me. steve
  13. hi guys, i took what i learned from my first holster (http://leatherworker...showtopic=46656) and made another one: i did not pre-punch any holes with my chisel punch this time, i used a round awl to make the holes as i was stitching. you may notice two different size thread, i stitched the reinforcment on with my 8 strand linen that i use for bowstrings and then the Barbours 6 cord linen arrived so i used it to stitch the rest of the holster together. the thinner thread made it alot easier but the round awl makes the holes too big. (i have a proper diamond awl now but it arrived after this project was complete) stitch line is closer to the gun and follows the profile much better. retention on this one is great. it may be a keeper. i think i will try the beeswax/neatsfoot that i keep seeing mentioned as a final finish this time. thanks for looking. comments and criticism are welcome. steve
  14. Thanks Murray. Color is Fiebings mahogany. steve
  15. Thanks Eric, I used a piece of sugar maple I sanded smooth as a boning tool. Not sure if it was the tool, the lack of skill, or the thickness of leather that was preventing good definition but I tried and tried to get a similar look that you show in your vids. I have a real boning tool on order, tho. The leather is from a crappy shoulder I picked up from my local Tandy store. It was supposed to be 8-9 oz but I didn't know what I was looking at when I bought it, just took the word of the sales guy. It ranges in thickness from just over 1/8" down to under 1/16" In places. This holster was cut from one of the more even, thicker areas. steve