Matt S

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About Matt S

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    England
  1. New member

    Welcome Charles. Those old 45s are great machines for heavy work and you got a good price. Yours has reverse, which most machines of that class didn't. You might want to look at upgrading to a digital servo motor, which are far more easily controllable than the old industrial standard clutch motors, which is probably what's mounted on that beast. Do you know what you want to make with it yet?
  2. Yeah that's pretty common with upholstery-weight machines like the 206. I have had a slack handful of machines in this category which are the same, from medium-low end Chinese to German Adler and Japanese Seiko. The shuttle drivers just aren't designed to pass 207/TKT13 around the bobbin casing so you run v138/TKT20 in the bobbin and use v207/TKT13 for a chunkier look, the seam being no stronger than its weakest thread (in this case the 138/20). This practice goes back at least a century. However this Sailrite machine is quoted for v92/tkt30 as the maximum thread size and running machines at their maximum for very long isn't a great idea. For a leather hobbyist I would say that a 206 or similar machine is a far better choice at a similar price than this Tandy machine. $400 is a great deal and barring any major damage I don't think your machine will depreciate at all. I can see why that would be an advantage. Also the increased flexibility over a wider range of lighter jobs would appeal to a lot of people. I wouldn't be surprised if it's great on canvas and lighter webbing (as it appears intended to do). Still seems like a hell of a drop in capability over an entry-level industrial for a leatherworker to me. As you've said upthread, it's a non-portable portable machine -- a clever combination of the least advantageous design elements of both designs.
  3. Benlilly I'm glad you like your machine. There's certainly a niche that Sailrite seems to fill, and good for them. However for leather work I see very few advantages to this machine over a basic upholstery-weight machine like a Consew 206, which is obtainable for similar or lower price. It's entirely possible that I'm missing something though. What do you like about your Sailrite?
  4. $1500? That's $150 more than a Consew 206 with servo. A 206 can use up to v207 thread, takes 111 type feet, and large 1" diameter M bobbins.
  5. Is this leather any good?

    What's wrong with reducing costs?
  6. "Genuine" Leather

    Does it t say "leather" anywhere on the belt itself? It may be that the dangler tag is the only piece that used to moo. I've found this myself, on very cheap shoes.
  7. Sell leather splitting machine Camoga CN403

    That's a fixed-knife splitter, which has different capabilities to a band-knife splitter like the one advertised. I got quoted £12,500 + tax for a 12" Camoga last month. This machine has a 18" capacity. Even having to deal with shipping, $3,300 is a bargain -- though you take a crapshoot on the condition of a used industrial machine. The extra knife alone is worth maybe $100-200 if new.
  8. Is this leather any good?

    Aparts from one branch in England and one in Spain all Tandy branches are located in the USA and Canada.
  9. Useable/practical/budget skiver

    Sorry that was the autocorrwrong on my phone playing up. Yes I meant "ruining" rather than "running" and yes the usual failure mode was the blade plunging too deep and cutting through the surface of the leather. Changing blades often reduced the failure rate but not enough for my liking. Again it's probably that I was putting far stiffer and heavier leather through it than was ever intended.
  10. Cutting table top material?

    Paraffin or whale oil in the lamps Harry? Thanks for the detailed response. I tend to be a bit hard on equipment so I think I'd better just pony up for a big chunk of HDPE. Most of my green mats have at least one hole from when I thought I could get away with punching "just a couple" holes. I could probably make do with a 6ft assembly/punching/general bench if I had a separate lightweight 8x4 layout/cutting table but I really can't fit both into my little shed.
  11. Useable/practical/budget skiver

    There were two major issues that I identified: keeping the feed and pull angles consistent and the frame flexing. The angle issue is just like that on a pull lap skiver -- a matter of geometry that can be solved with concentration and care. However I found that the frame was flexing very slightly under the strain of what I was trying to do, which made the blade depth and angle bounce around. Whether these issues were inherent in the design or due to the fact I was using a Chinese knock-off I can't say. I suspect that it would flex far less with upholstery leather but don't recall ever trying it. Don't get me wrong, when it worked it was amazing -- a £80 pocket sized machine that takes razor blades costing pennies doing a job that I thought I needed a £1000 machine to do. However it was just running too much leather and I was having to work so slowly that I bought a bell skiver when a good deal came up. Never looked back.
  12. Useable/practical/budget skiver

    There were two major issues that I identified: keeping the feed and pull angles consistent and the frame flexing. The angle issue is just like that on a pull lap skiver -- a matter of geometry that can be solved with concentration and care. However I found that the frame was flexing very slightly under the strain of what I was trying to do, which made the blade depth and angle bounce around. Whether these issues were inherent in the design or due to the fact I was using a Chinese knock-off I can't say. I suspect that it would flex far less with upholstery leather but don't recall ever trying it. Don't get me wrong, when it worked it was amazing -- a £80 pocket sized machine that takes razor blades costing pennies doing a job that I thought I needed a £1000 machine to do. However it was just running too much leather and I was having to work so slowly that I bought a bell skiver when a good deal came up. Never looked back.
  13. Cutting table top material?

    I need to resurface my bench but I'm holding off until I've decided whether I have to leave our as 8x2 or can squeeze a 8x4 into the workshop. None of the intensive surfaces I've tried so far (chipboard, hardboard, green mats) have worked well enough so I'm going to bite the bullet on something decent, even if it is expensive. HDPE is usually what's recommended but most suppliers here in the UK only but it as 1x2 metered sheets (about 3'3"x6'6"). Full 8x2 or 8x4 sheets aren't cheap in the sorts of thickness needed but they're out there. I found the suppliers through Google and eBay. Harry those mats look handy and a good price but I'm worried about how tough they are, especially when I go heavy handed with a round knife. I'd also like a surface on which I can punch with impunity. What did you used to use in industry? Cos I'm fed up of keep spending money and ruining leather on inadequate surfaces. Full bench sized HDPE 10+mm thick is what I'm leaning towards. Yes it's an expense but if I spread that over the expected decades of use it works out pretty cheap.
  14. Useable/practical/budget skiver

    What's the budget? A Chinese bell skiver's £1000, which means you'd get one in the States for about $1000. You'd probably get most of that back selling it on afterwards. There are little skiving machines like the Scharf-fix that take razor blades. I imported one of the Chinese copies, used it for a few months, figurated it wasn't suitable for my needs, then sold it for about what I paid for it. I wanted to step-skive medium-stiff 2+mm chrome tan for turned edges but being designed for bookbinding I think the frame wasn't stiff enough for what I wanted to do. Upholstery leather would probably be better but it'd still be awkward doing large panels. Hand skiving would be slow and awkward, but it's an option. I've got a lap skiver, a bell skiver and a crank splitter but I will daily reach for a skirt shave or skiving knife if it's a one-off. Granted I don't often skive by hand anything so spongy as upholstery leather, nor as long as a car seat panel, but it's an option that works if you keep your edge sharp. Me? I'd take it to someone who had a bell skiver and pay them some beer to do the skiving. Hint to anyone around the north west of London: I have a bell skiver and like beer. I'm not sure where STL is but I'm sure somebody on this forum has a bell skiver and is within a reasonable drive of you.
  15. What type of Hand Stitch is this and....?

    Depends on the thread, what it's coated with, how tight the holes are, how much rubbing occurs against the seam... It's often claimed that a saddle stitch won't unravel if one thread gets broken. Well yeah maybe, I've seen it where it has and hasn't unravelled. There's a lot of factors involved. Most threads we use in hand stitching are so strong they're unlikely to be broken in everyday use so IMHO it's a moot point. As @alpha2 states above there are exceptions, like at the mouth of a pistol holster or knife sheath, and there skilled craftspeople often reinforce with a rivet, extra stitching or a chicago screw. Yes, this is called backstitching and it's usual just to snip the thread. For linen thread 2-3 stitches is usually plenty. I find that synthetic threads, being more slippery, sometimes need a couple more. You always want to secure the end of your stitching somehow. Backstitching, tying off, melting synthetic thread, a drop of glue, or sandwiching with a rivet or other piece of hardware. What you use depends on the circumstances, and I'll often use two methods at once just for "belt and braces". If you don't secure the ends somehow, you're liable to the stitching unravelling sooner or later (usually sooner).