Dwight

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About Dwight

  • Rank
    Leatherworker.net Regular
  • Birthday 11/17/1944

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  • Website URL
    http://www.dwightsgunleather.com
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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central Ohio
  • Interests
    Church Pastor, Shooter, Leatherworking, Hunting, making most anything for the first time (yeah, I get bored easy)

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    gun leather
  • Interested in learning about
    working with leather
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    from 1911.com

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  1. It would be tricky, . . . but turning it inside out, . . . would be the first thing I would do, . . . so you are like sewing inside a box. I did a really deep bag for a wedding gift some time back and that is how I did it. Worked out fine. I think this one could be done that way, . . . but it would depend on the dimensions. May God bless, Dwight
  2. If a feller had a couple weeks he didn't know what else to do with, . . . I really think the boss could be changed over to a "air over oil" cylinder operation quite easily, . . . with a rocker pedal for the foot, . . . and a sliding air switch and second cylinder on the presser foot, . . . he could keep both hands on the leather, . . . and just as fast as he could rock that foot of his, . . . he could do stitches. BUT, . . . my way, . . . the arm gets tired, . . . it's time for Hershey's and coffee, . . . May God bless, Dwight
  3. Mine is a Tippmann Boss, . . . love the thing, . . . my website shows some of my work, . . . all done with it. Picture shows the first belt I did in my new shop, . . . fixed a flat table I can slide on the machine, . . . or slip it off and not use the table. May God bless, Dwight
  4. I'll get in here, . . . mine has been a "new" aluminum, . . . from 2005 or 2006, . . . somewhere back there. I use it for whatever I make out of leather, . . . if it needs sewn, . . . except vests, . . . different machine for that. Look on my website for examples, . . . page 3 to be specific, . . . it sews everything up to and including 3/4 inch of dry veggie tanned leather, . . . although not too well on the 3/4 inch stuff. I use it to punch the holes in those things, . . . then hand stitch it. I live 2 hours from the factory, . . . whenever I have a problem (happened twice so far), . . . that I cannot fix myself, . . . I load it up, . . . call em and give em a heads up, . . . one of the mechanics cleans off a bench, . . . fixes my machine, . . . 2 hours later I am back home sewing again (or taking a nap). The Tippmann people are great people to work with. The other day I finished a belt that was darn near 3/8 of an inch thick, . . . for a feller that is in the 44 in waist area, . . . all in about 20 minutes, . . . at almost 6 stitches per inch, . . . total sewing was something over 100 inches. I use everything from 207 thread to 415, . . . but 346 is my mainstay, . . . very seldom use anything else. A happy customer??? Yessir, . . . I am, . . . and if I could go back and buy a different machine, . . . I most likely would not do it, . . . this one does what I want, where I want it, and the way I want it, . . . electrics do not always do that. May God bless, Dwight
  5. 1. Yes, you can paint the dye on the other pieces, . . . but will that not allow those pieces to be of a different color? I would at least dab them in a corner somewhere out of the way, . . . to see if maybe dabbing them with a sponge will color them without dunking them (the felt pieces). 2. When you say "regular" Feibing black dye, . . . I'm not sure there is any such thing. There is oil dye, . . . USMC dye, . . . water based dye, . . . and probably one or two I forgot to mention. I only use the professional oil dye, . . . so you'll have to check yours against that, . . . maybe talk to someone at the store. BE SURE to thin the black down half and half with their reducer though, . . . or you will be forever getting off the extra pigment. May God bless, Dwight
  6. From the appearance, . . . it looks like an oiled leather, . . . no hard finish on it, . . . should not be a big deal to dye it. The one thing you are going to want to do, . . . as much as is possible, . . . take it apart. Get as much of the hardware off as you can. Go to a Tandy leather store, . . . buy 4 of their 4 oz bottles of pro oil black dye, . . . and 4 of their 4 oz bottles of dye reducer. Stop at Walmart and buy an aluminum pan for cooking a turkey, . . . or if you have one to spare at home, . . . a 8 x 14 cake pan works fine, . . . that is what I use. Get a pair of rubber gloves and a roll of paper towels. Mix all the dye and all the reducer together well, . . . pour it in the pan, . . . and one at a time, . . . snake each piece into and through the dye, . . . you don't need to linger any great time, . . . if it is black colored, . . . it is dyed. Hold it up over the pan until the drip-drip-drip stops, . . . then lay it face up on a piece of cardboard. DO NOT HANG it up to dry. Give it 10 to 15 minutes or so and then with the gloves still on, . . . holding the leather by the sides of the straps, . . . take paper towels and wipe off any dye that got on the metal. Sometimes the dye will stain the metal, . . . sometimes it will not, . . . you don't really want to take that chance. Leaving it on there may stain it. Allow the harness to dry for at least 24 hours, . . . then with another paper towel, . . . give it a coat of neatsfoot oil (if you can find it in a small bottle), . . . or olive oil, . . . just enough that you can honestly see that some oil is trying to soak in. Some black pigment will rub off on the towel, . . . don't worry about it. Allow that to dry for a couple of days, . . . then get a white tee shirt you don't like, . . . and laying each strap down on a hard surface that won't move, . . . buff the heck out of the whole harness. When black quits coming off the piece you are buffing, . . . you are done. Once the buffing is done, . . . you should be done. The obvious alternative, . . . is to take it to a local saddle shop, holster shop, or belt shop, . . . have the folks there do it for you, . . . it'll be twice the cost of doing it yourself, . . . but you only have to spill black oil dye on something ONE TIME, to know you don't ever want to do that again. Good luck. May God bless, Dwight
  7. You can also contact Weaver Leather in Berlin, Ohio, . . . they will sell you the leather and for a small fee will cut it pretty much to the width's you want. (at least they used to do it, . . . don't know for certain today's details, . . . but contact them, . . . they are absolutely wonderful people to work with) May God bless, Dwight
  8. I guess I must be doing something wrong, . . . I use the "flick your bic" type lighter, . . . have never burned a piece of leather yet. I leave about a 1/8 of an inch of thread when I cut it, . . . hit it with the edge of the yellow flame, . . . it melts / burns away, . . . I give it a little thumb rub, . . . done. May God bless, Dwight
  9. Ya did good, . . . Springfield came to mind, . . . but when I saw Weaver had em, . . . I left Springfield off. I've actually been on the Weaver location, . . . wonderful people to deal with, . . . that's why I sent you there. Sorry it wasn't exactly what you wanted. Come to think of it, . . . it's about time to arrange another expedition to that area. May God bless, Dwight
  10. Try Weaver Leather, . . . in I think Berlin, Ohio. http://products.weaverleathersupply.com/search?w=horse hide belt They should be able to help you. May God bless, Dwight
  11. Hopefully they don't sit down in the dirt. A muzzle full of .45ACP dirt can get someone hurt bad. The reason I recognize it, . . . I'm only 72 and haven't completely grown up, . . . I still play in the dirt quite a bit. Just finished fixing a 10 inch field tile buried about 48 inches in the ground, . . . it blew out, . . . created a 6 foot diameter hole. Had to play in the dirt big time that day. Playing in the garden will get one dirty too, . . . and sometimes, . . . just sitting down next to a camp fire, . . . making memories or smores, . . . checkin' out my cast iron dutch oven, . . . and whatever is cookin in it. Seriously, . . . I would not own a slide, . . . and refuse to make em. They could be a cash item, . . . but I like my customers better than that. But, . . . anyway, . . . I still like your work, . . . keep it up. May God bless, Dwight
  12. I would say personally, that if you sent it to me, . . . I'd be more than willing to test wear it for you for a couple of years. Seriously, . . . really good looking, . . . the only thing I don't do for sure with my pancakes, . . . I never allow the muzzle to go below the holster, . . . sitting down on the ground "could" get a muzzle full of dirt, . . . which could be very dangerous. Other than that, . . . it's a good job. May God bless, Dwight
  13. Thanks DJole, . . . wouldn't you love to sit down and have a conversation with the person that made that shoe?? May God bless, Dwight
  14. Those pictures were the last one I did, . . . and it was indeed fun. If I had to choose making them or a regular Duke rig, . . . the money belt is probably a bit easier to do, . . . and because it is a bit "different" folks will pay a bit more for it than a normal Duke rig. May God bless, Dwight
  15. Honestly, I don't know plinkercases, . . . snaps are probably not "period correct", . . . but then again, not much more than the leather is, . . . and even it has undergone many changes in the way it is created / finished, etc. I tend to go by the overall look, . . . Western?, . . . OK, . . . and I kind of drop it there. But that's just me, . . . and how I approach this stuff. May God bless, Dwight