Dwight

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About Dwight

  • Rank
    Leatherworker.net Regular
  • Birthday 11/17/1944

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  • Website URL
    http://www.dwightsgunleather.com
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    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central Ohio
  • Interests
    Church Pastor, Shooter, Leatherworking, Hunting, making most anything for the first time (yeah, I get bored easy)

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    gun leather
  • Interested in learning about
    working with leather
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    from 1911.com

Recent Profile Visitors

22,742 profile views
  1. Hey, Mike, . . . we missed you my friend, . . . VERY glad to see you back on the keyboard and the leather working table. If I said you were instrumental in enhancing my love of leather working, . . . I would be just scratching the surface. You have been a tremendous example to all of us here, . . . along with Lobo, . . . and a few others. Keep up the good work, . . . and don't let that be your last one, . . . the folks down at Mop & Glo are depending on you to keep them in business. May God bless, Dwight
  2. Excellent work, . . . AND, . . . I love the grips, . . . they add much to the overall image.............. The little touch of red on the rose petals, . . . making it look like it once was fully bright red, . . . but only the touches remain, . . . EXCELLENT !! May God bless, Dwight
  3. Work Order

    Leading edge is the front of the holster, . . . the top of the barrel side. Trailing edge is the rear edge of the holster, . . . traditionally it surrounds the trigger guard, . . . or at least that side of the weapon. My vacuum forming rig is a vinyl bag, hose, and a vacuum pump. Take a look at it here: The dremel tool burnisher is a 1/2 inch diameter piece of dowel that has a 1/8 inch drill bit glued into it's center, . . . put the drill in the Dremel tool end, . . . use various files to create the burnishing tool you want, . . . I have several I've made, . . . they work really well. May God bless, Dwight
  4. Personally, . . . from my hunting experience, . . . I don't even think of a belt slide for .308 or 30-06. A butt stock carrier, . . . or pocket carry is much preferred, . . . and the length of the shells is the singular reason why. I would make one for a customer if he demanded I do so, . . . but it would be reluctantly, knowing after a couple hunts it would go in his drawer with the useless holsters he bought down through the years. May God bless, Dwight
  5. Work Order

    First thing you need to understand, . . . you can wet form a holster, . . . OR, . . . you can cut /tool/stamp a holster, . . . but unless you are Santa Claus or the Lone Ranger, . . . you cannot do both. Let your customer determine which he/she wants, . . . and provide it. Generally, . . . the list of how I do things goes something like this, . . . it would be for a pancake or "sort of" pancake type holster: Lay out pattern and cut the back of the holster. It will very seldom have anything seriously done to it, . . . so it is first, . . . to get it out of the way. Lay out front pattern, . . . I generally use a process where the "leading edge" of the holster is seriously cut out first. The trailing edge is always cut a tad big. Look at the front and back, . . . where do I need to dress the edge (makes it easier to do now than later), . . . do that edge beveling Cut out, . . . bevel, . . . and sew on any "accent" pieces, such as a piece of ostrich, buffalo, elephant, . . . a panel with a LEO shield stamped, . . . a stiffening panel, . . . etc. Contact cement the "leading edge" of the front and back, . . . sand the edges, . . . sew that leading edge completely. This is where I wet form my holster, . . . laying the front over the weapon as it lays in position on the back, . . . generally, I use a vacuum forming process, . . . easy and very good results come from it. Let the thing dry, . . . COMPLETELY, . . . I often use a drying box, . . . 130 deg F, . . . for an hour or so. Sew the back edge, . . . but first, . . . apply contact cement to both pieces, . . . put the gun in the holster, . . . make sure it is properly positioned, . . . stick the pieces together. Here is why I cut the trailing edge a tad bigger, . . . just in case there is something goofy going on, . . . I now trim that so it matches the back, . . . then sand the edges, . . . and finish sewing the holster together. Finish beveling all edges, . . . and I then use a Dremel tool to dress the edges, . . . make em shine real good is the goal. Apply a light coat of neatsfoot oil here, . . . with a cheap bristle brush type paint brush, . . . this is a "have to" step if you generally are playing around with any light or medium brown colors, . . . tans as well. I went for a LOOOOOOONG time trying to figure what I was doing wrong, . . . and got mottled and blotchy tans and light browns. The neatsfoot oil is the one thing I found that all but eliminates that problem altogether. NEXT : all my holsters are dip dyed, . . . and after the dip dying is done, . . . it goes to the arbor press where my maker's stamp is applied. AGAIN: Let the thing dry, . . . COMPLETELY, . . . I often use a drying box, . . . 130 deg F, . . . for an hour or so, . . . then let it hang for the next 24 hours. After it is dried, . . . belt loops are applied, . . . or punched out, . . . as appropriate. Final step is one or more coats of Resolene, . . . basically the only finish I use. Hope this helps, . . . holler back if you have any questions. May God bless, Dwight
  6. One word, . . . Resolene, . . . been making belts (as well as cowboy rigs) for over 10 years, . . . only belt that was a problem, . . . guy measured 53 inches, . . . came back to get it about 8 weeks later, . . . he needed a 56, . . . lol. Seriously, . . . Resolene finished belts have never been any problem for me, . . . all my customers are happy with them, . . . many of them have multiple belts in various colors / designs. May God bless, Dwight
  7. Just wondering if anyone has done a seat for a Suzuki Kingquad, . . . its a 700 cc beast of a 4 wheel machine. I want to do the seat this winter, . . . along with a set of bags for it, . . . as I'm making it street legal as a motorcycle. Appreciate any info you guys have. May God bless, Dwight
  8. Chaps for my Dad

    Really great work , . . . I'm surprised that you didn't get any offers to "adopt" another dad or two.........lol Seriously, though, . . . you long ago passed me up in the decorating dept, . . . I can make the holsters, gun belts, chaps, spur straps, etc, . . . and they work good if not great, . . . but they are all plain jane vanilla because I simply cannot do the level of carving and stamping that you and others exhibit here. Don't lose that talent, . . . not many have it, . . . and your got a really good dose of it. May God bless, Dwight
  9. That looks good from here. Main thing, . . . are you happy with it?? Does it do it's intended function?? Those two are the main two pieces of criteria, . . . whether it is a BBQ show piece is a whole 'nuther category. May God bless, Dwight
  10. Troublesome Boss

    A few years back, I ran across the design used for the Roman soldier of old sandals. It is a pretty ingenious design, . . . sole, . . . middle sole which actually becomes the sides of the sandals, . . . and insole where the feet actually stand in the sandals. Take a gander out on the internet, . . . I'm sure you can find it as well, . . . modify that design and make a pair. My pair used up about 5 square feet of veggie tan 7/8 leather, . . . are very comfortable, . . . and have a very distinctive look about them. There are any number of modifications could be made to them to make them "yours", . . . and might be worth while as a personal investment. Actually the hardest part of the whole thing was having to hand sew the seam up the back of the heel, . . . as I hate hand sewing. I contact cemented all three pieces together, . . . took em to my Tippmann Boss, . . . voila, . . . sandals. May God bless, Dwight
  11. Threepersons Done!

    That work is definitely above my pay grade and station in life. Really, great work Josh, . . . in my opinion, more artistic than utilitarian, . . . and that is exactly what a lot of people will pay really good money for. May God bless, Dwight
  12. Just shipped this one out earlier today, . . . for a S&W Governor. Actually was one of the harder ones I've ever patterned, . . . but was very happy with the finished product. May God bless, Dwight
  13. Really super looking, . . . great job. AND, . . . congratulations on the amount of patience you have, . . . I would never be able to keep my sanity with that much tooling. May God bless, Dwight
  14. Form follows function is a great reminder of how leather working came about in the first place. A product need was determined, . . . and once the basic need was filled, . . . others began to embellish it, . . . and it became for example, the silver laden trophy saddles we often see or the BBQ holster many folks have. Your product needs two things to embellish it and get it ship shape: bevel and buff the raw edges of the product, . . . sand down the edges so that it is a uniform distance from stitch line to product edge. Other than that, . . . good job. May God bless, Dwight
  15. Thread size matters!?

    I use 346 thread at 6 stitches per inch on belts, holsters, purses, billfolds, . . . darn near everything, . . . never any problems. I wouldn't think a pony seat would be any different. May God bless, Dwight