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Hi all =)

So far i have tried Russet, Tan, Light, medium and dark Brown and they all look the same colour - a Red-Brown colour.
Slightly different shades and densities but all a very similer colour.

The only colour that was different was Chocolate.

Could it be the colour of the leather thats giving everything a red colour or Some how the way im applying it?

Its a nice colour but everything i have is the same-ish colour

Im looking for a  Brown without the Red but just cant get it.

I want a brown similer to this:
AW9-double-knife-pancake-sheath1.jpg

Any suggestions?

Thank you =)

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Someone said to add a drop or two of green, to subdue the red.

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I was told, add a light coat, and walk away for a day. 

I had the same problem with this stuff in the beginning. Over saturation makes everything dark brown. 

You might try dipping your dauber into a paper towel or rag before hitting the leather with it. This may retard the oversaturation (think I'm gonna try it to).

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I had the same issue when I first started.  It’s not a bad color but not what I wanted.  I diluted the colors down by at least 50% with alcohol and that helped tremendously.  If you like the color but don’t think it’s dark enough, don’t worry.  It gets considerably darker by itself over time.  

This is one of the reasons that I stopped dyeing myself and just purchased the color that I wanted.  I wasted more leather trying to get a particular color than I care to say. 

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3 minutes ago, Webicons said:

I had the same issue when I first started.  It’s not a bad color but not what I wanted.  I diluted the colors down by at least 50% with alcohol and that helped tremendously.  If you like the color but don’t think it’s dark enough, don’t worry.  It gets considerably darker by itself over time.  

This is one of the reasons that I stopped dyeing myself and just purchased the color that I wanted.  I wasted more leather trying to get a particular color than I care to say. 

Haha, me too. The perfect LSU purple is easy to get, right up until you put neetsfoot oil on it.

Edited by bikermutt07

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1 minute ago, Webicons said:

Well that certainly isn't enough for my needs. Ha

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Bikermutte, throw that Neatsfoot oil in the trash and get yourself some Bee's Natural Saddle Oil.  Won't darken your leather at all. I quit using that other stuff years ago.  Didn't like what it did to my leather.

Terry

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37 minutes ago, terrymac said:

Bikermutte, throw that Neatsfoot oil in the trash and get yourself some Bee's Natural Saddle Oil.  Won't darken your leather at all. I quit using that other stuff years ago.  Didn't like what it did to my leather.

Terry

This is the first I heard of that?!? And dang it, I just bought a 16oz bottle of neetsfoot oil.

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Yes neetsfoot oil does darken leather all by itself.  If you are using a dark dye, that may not be a problem.  But if you wish to maintain the lighter original colour of the leather, don't use it.

Tom

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I just discovered this problem myself. My mahogany almost looks black. Then I found that if you bend and flex the leather, the color comes out, kind of like pull up. I will dilute it next time though with alcohol. Does that need to be denatured or will isopropyl work?

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2 hours ago, cradom said:

Does that need to be denatured or will isopropyl work?

Either one will work fine.  The extra water in the isopropyl will slow down dry time but negligible.  Always test dyes out on the exact leather you will be using and as close to the same cut of leather. Different cuts absorb dyes at different rates. 

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That's why I switched to an airbrush. I get a nice even color that is the color I want.

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A suggestion; and I'm not being facetious or silly with this. Get your colour perception tested. 95% of men have some degree of colour blindness whereas only 10% of women have some colour blindness [figures are approximate] I am colour blind. On a scale of 1 [perfect colour perception] to 10 [black & white only] I come in at about 8

Most browns and dark browns, dark greens and very dark blues look the same to me

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9 minutes ago, Mattsbagger said:

That's why I switched to an airbrush. I get a nice even color that is the color I want.

That’s a skill that I’d like to someday pickup.  I can see that being a game changer.  Just seems like a lot of work and cleanup.  On my to do list though. 

Do you have any photos of airbrushing using dilutions of the same color? That would be interesting and relevant to this thread. 

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Airbrushing really isn't that much extra work. Cleaning up may take 5 minutes and use a few thimblefuls of isopropyl and a couple paper towels.

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2 hours ago, battlemunky said:

Airbrushing really isn't that much extra work. Cleaning up may take 5 minutes and use a few thimblefuls of isopropyl and a couple paper towels.

Does it save a bunch on the dye supply?

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1 hour ago, bikermutt07 said:

Does it save a bunch on the dye supply?

Mutt, you would be amazed how much less dye you use when you airbrush it.  Granted, the dye doesn’t penetrate as deep as when you dip it or apply heavily with a sponge or dauber, but I find it perfectly acceptable for most of m6 projects.  Airbrushing dye is very forgiving - hard to mess anything up!

Gary

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24 minutes ago, garypl said:

Mutt, you would be amazed how much less dye you use when you airbrush it.  Granted, the dye doesn’t penetrate as deep as when you dip it or apply heavily with a sponge or dauber, but I find it perfectly acceptable for most of m6 projects.  Airbrushing dye is very forgiving - hard to mess anything up!

Gary

Shoot, I'm sold. I got a Graco 390. You think that would work?:crazy:

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1 hour ago, Mattsbagger said:

Way Less dye! 

Yes, way less dye and pretty forgiving, yes. I think, with the coupns, I have all of $40 for my rig. It is the Harbor Freight cheapo jobber but so far, it is wholely and fully acceptable for leather working.

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On 2/11/2018 at 6:02 PM, battlemunky said:

Yes, way less dye and pretty forgiving, yes. I think, with the coupns, I have all of $40 for my rig. It is the Harbor Freight cheapo jobber but so far, it is wholely and fully acceptable for leather working.

I also use the cheap Harbor Freight airbrushes - I like the one that uses the plastic bottles - easy to switch bottles and airbrush stays clean.  Sprays dyes and Resolene and costs less than $10.   Small oil-less compressor was about $80.  

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56 minutes ago, bikermutt07 said:

Shoot, I'm sold. I got a Graco 390. You think that would work?:crazy:

That’s a powerful airless sprayer - I think it would be difficult to control the output when spraying small amounts of dye - overkill and looks like it would not be able to spray unless you have a large container of dye.

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