TonyRV2

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About TonyRV2

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 08/05/1955

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Hawthorne, FL & West Branch, MI (Snowbird!)
  • Interests
    Knife Sheaths, Knife Making

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Knife Sheaths, Holsters, Guitar Straps
  • Interested in learning about
    Saddle and Harness making
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    internet search

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  1. Likely a reaction to some product used in the tanning or finishing process. Allergies can come on sudden like that. Try getting leather from a different source and see if you still have a reaction. Try just to eliminate one thing at a time in trying to narrow it down. Good luck.
  2. Welcome aboard Jet...I'm about 20 miles east of Gainesville on Little Orange Lake near Hawthorne. I make knives here and do my leather crafting at my place in West Branch, MI. Since I do the snowbird thing I wondered what I might do when I was away from my knife shop, and making sheaths came to mind. That's how I started doing leather. I retired from teaching college electronics about a month ago so I'm looking forward to my new avocation. I imagine as an avionics tech, you dabbled in a little electronics yourself.
  3. This comes from the files of "things I learned while looking up other things". I've always been fascinated with the origin of words and phrases, especially commonly used words that aren't usually given much thought....we just say them. Cobweb for instance, peaked my curiosity while I was staring at...you guessed it...a cobweb. Where did the 'cob' part come from I wondered. Turns out that its from a middle English word for spider.."coppe". The Merriam Webster article that I was reading then went on to explain that the word 'cob', which refers to corn, comes from an entirely different middle English word, 'cobbe', meaning 'head'. This word was used to describe anything with a round shape, such as a corn cob. So it seems then that we have the origin for the name of the tool that we're all familiar with, the 'head knife'. Oh....and I did finally knock down that cobweb, literally, and figuratively. ;-) Edit...sorry for the double post. I was given an error message that said it didn't post and posted again...got the error message again and turns out they both posted.
  4. This comes from the files of "things I learned while looking up other things". I've always been fascinated with the origin of words and phrases, especially commonly used words that aren't usually given much thought....we just say them. Cobweb for instance, peaked my curiosity while I was staring at...you guessed it...a cobweb. Where did the 'cob' part come from I wondered. Turns out that its from a middle English word for spider.."coppe". The Merriam Webster article that I was reading then went on to explain that the word 'cob', which refers to corn, comes from an entirely different middle English word, 'cobbe', meaning 'head'. This word was used to describe anything with a round shape, such as a corn cob. So it seems then that we have the origin for the name of the tool that we're all familiar with, the 'head knife'. Oh....and I did finally knock down that cobweb, literally, and figuratively. ;-)
  5. For under $3.50 shipped, this device will do the same job as long as you adjust opposite sides to the same length. (A small price to pay verses 30 bucks plus shipping for the Tandy stamping guide. An added benefit is that this tool can be used to find unknown angles as well! (its intended purpose) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000V4FJ4C?ref_=ams_ad_dp_asin_1
  6. Try a local butcher supply retailer. That's where I bought my 24 x 36 poly board....and reasonably priced I might add.
  7. While I don't have a leather related liquid disaster to share, I do feel you pain. Once, when deciding to do a little touch up painting on a car, I filled an 8oz styrofoam cup up with some lacquer paint. Did you know that lacquer paint will eat through styrofoam in a matter of seconds?
  8. There are too many folks in the world that confuse opinion with truth. The sooner we all learn the difference, the better off we'll all be. That said, I guess I haven't been around here long enough to experience much drama, but I know one thing...I've learned a lot from the kind folks on this forum and I'm appreciative. For every drama queen around here, I bet there's a thousand others like me that just want to learn from those that have tread down this road before us. Don't let the drama get you down. There are many, many more folks here that need your help than not, and I want to personally thank everyone on this site that chooses to convey their personal knowledge of leathercraft to those less experienced. When you share knowledge, you leave an indelible mark on the world. Please don't be discouraged by the pompous behavior of a few, just make judicial use of the ignore button. :-)
  9. As of this morning, the issue seems to be fixed for me. Thank you!
  10. I would be interested in the creasers and possibly the glue pot lot if it is one of those metal glue pots. Let me know, I'll meet your price for these items.
  11. Hey Dan...just for future reference, you're right, cameras don't take 1.46MB pics. But most computers have at least rudimentary picture viewing software that will allow you to crop photos, reduce picture size, and reduce resolution. If the software is not on you computer, you can easily find a free app for that. It really is very easy to do, even a caveman (or Luddite) can do it.
  12. Same here.
  13. Bob, I must respectfully disagree with your numbers. Median household income in the United States as of 2015 was just shy of $56.5K according to the U.S. census bureau. Based upon a 2080 hour work year (40 hours per week), that would be closer to $27/hour. Also as of 2015, a family of four is considered to be living on poverty if the household income is less than about 24k per year. This translates to about 11.50/hr. I'm not sure that the whole job would take 7 hours of time, but base on that number we're between $80 and $190. All in all, this is an interesting way to figure out what ones time might be worth, on average, but may not be totally relevant to the task at hand. For instance, what's the replacement cost of the bag? No ones going to pay $150 to repair a $100 dollar bag for instance. Are we hand stitching or machine stitching. If the repair can be done on a machine, it can be done quicker and I might be willing to except less, etc.,etc. I guess it all boils down to what the craftsman is willing to accept based upon ability, experience and expectation. https://www.census.gov/library/publications/2016/demo/p60-256.html
  14. I think 45 bucks is about right for this. I have to disagree with a few others that say if you had the machinery to spit these things out you could go cheaper. Doesn't work that way. No one cares if your cutting out dies with a clicker, or machine sewing vs hand sewing. What counts is the quality of the item, regardless of the path to the final product. What this means is that to a great extent, the market sets the price. I can't charge 100 bucks just because I do everything by hand, thats nonsense. The exception would be if your an artisan with a reputation and a mass following. If people are lining up for your goods, then you've established your own market niche and can charge what that market will bare....most of us can only hope to reach that goal.