TonyRV2

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About TonyRV2

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Hawthorne, FL & West Branch, MI (Snowbird!)
  • Interests
    Knife Sheaths, Knife Making

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Knife Sheaths, Holsters, Guitar Straps
  • Interested in learning about
    Saddle and Harness making
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    internet search

Recent Profile Visitors

1,640 profile views
  1. How To Sharpen A Round Knife

    In the for what its worth department, as a knifemaker (making sheaths got me into leatherwork) I own a couple 2X72" knife grinders. Not only can you purchase abrasive belts for these grinders, but they may also be fitted with a 2X72" strop. These strops are made to be put on the machine with the grain side out. In the final analysis, I personally don't believe it makes a difference if you strop on the grain side or on the flesh side. After all, after several stropping the flesh side is going to be burnished down anyways. The whole idea behind stropping is to realign all the little micro-teeth that have formed on the cutting edge as well as to apply a polish to the edge. Green jewelers rouge is my preferred stropping compound.
  2. Good luck with your sheath. Building knife sheaths is the reason I got into leatherworking because I'm also a knifemaker. With a 9-10oz welt, you could pull that knife in and out 10,000 times and I don't care how sharp it is, your not going to bust through to the stitching. A person would really have to purposely start sawing on the welt to try to damage it to that extent. As one other poster mentioned, after you get it all glued up put your stitch line about 1/8 to 3/16 or so from the edge and make your welt about 1/2 wide. A person would have to cut through (sideways mind you) 5/16 of leather before a stitch was exposed. Very unlikely so you can relax.
  3. Knuckle duster

    Great idea....I like it!
  4. Our most popular stamps

    PM sent requesting catalog, thanks.
  5. Removing oil stain on tooled veg tan

    Before you do anything else, or put any more products on this, try setting it out in the sunshine for a few days. This may lighten it up very nicely for you, I know that this works with Resolene.
  6. I bought this glue keeper a few months ago for 14 bucks on ebay...there are many like it there and on amazon similarly priced. So far, so good, I have no complaints and its keeping the glue and brush fresh. http://www.ebay.com/itm/30-Ounce-Glue-Container-with-Brush-Minimal-Vapor-Emission-Extends-Brush-Life-/222057143407?rsta=en_US(en_US)&cnac=US&mail=sys&e=op&unp_tpcid=email-receipt-auction-payment&ppid=PPX000608&calf=3e87e07622c1&calc=3e87e07622c1&pgrp=main:email&unptid=ac5a3476-6d70-11e7-b1f3-5cb90192cbb0&mchn=em&t=&s=ci&page=main:email&cal=3e87e07622c1&cust=7XC822358F881290A
  7. We're going to have a few sunny days here in northern MI for the next few days (I'm in West Branch). Try putting those pieces outside in the sunshine for a few days. This will lighten up anything that has neatsfoot on it. In the future, when applying neatsfoot oil, apply only light coats and allow thorough drying. Too much oil on leather is actually worse than no oil at all.
  8. Advice on leather for knife sheats

    I also make sheaths as well as holsters. I think most would recommend shoulders for making a sheath. This is what I use.
  9. Oil and Resolene?

    If your serious about sheath making, consider getting the 3 DVD instructional series done by Paul Long...a master crafter of knife sheaths. The DVD''s are a bit pricey, but when I started out they probably cut 2 or 3 years off of the learning curve, well worth it imho. Personally, I wouldn't soak a knife sheath in anything that I wouldn't want to come in contact with a knife blade. Which basically means that I wouldn't soak the sheath in anything at all. Usually I line my sheaths and find this to be enough. Also, if you produce a proper pattern for your sheath, something that Paul covers, then there is no need for any kind of molding what so ever, and to tell you the truth, I know of no sheath makers that do this, but that's just me, I'm not saying its never done.
  10. Very old, very dry leather repair

    If it were my project, I'd keep all of the original hardware and replace all of the leather, possibly keeping the best pieces of old leather for use as inserts if possible.
  11. WTB Black Alligator small belly pieces...

    Yes, those bands are very expensive being that there rated to 100 meters that the gator doesn't come back to life.
  12. All of sudden allergic to leather, WTH!

    Likely a reaction to some product used in the tanning or finishing process. Allergies can come on sudden like that. Try getting leather from a different source and see if you still have a reaction. Try just to eliminate one thing at a time in trying to narrow it down. Good luck.
  13. Hello From Central Florida

    Welcome aboard Jet...I'm about 20 miles east of Gainesville on Little Orange Lake near Hawthorne. I make knives here and do my leather crafting at my place in West Branch, MI. Since I do the snowbird thing I wondered what I might do when I was away from my knife shop, and making sheaths came to mind. That's how I started doing leather. I retired from teaching college electronics about a month ago so I'm looking forward to my new avocation. I imagine as an avionics tech, you dabbled in a little electronics yourself.
  14. This comes from the files of "things I learned while looking up other things". I've always been fascinated with the origin of words and phrases, especially commonly used words that aren't usually given much thought....we just say them. Cobweb for instance, peaked my curiosity while I was staring at...you guessed it...a cobweb. Where did the 'cob' part come from I wondered. Turns out that its from a middle English word for spider.."coppe". The Merriam Webster article that I was reading then went on to explain that the word 'cob', which refers to corn, comes from an entirely different middle English word, 'cobbe', meaning 'head'. This word was used to describe anything with a round shape, such as a corn cob. So it seems then that we have the origin for the name of the tool that we're all familiar with, the 'head knife'. Oh....and I did finally knock down that cobweb, literally, and figuratively. ;-) Edit...sorry for the double post. I was given an error message that said it didn't post and posted again...got the error message again and turns out they both posted.
  15. This comes from the files of "things I learned while looking up other things". I've always been fascinated with the origin of words and phrases, especially commonly used words that aren't usually given much thought....we just say them. Cobweb for instance, peaked my curiosity while I was staring at...you guessed it...a cobweb. Where did the 'cob' part come from I wondered. Turns out that its from a middle English word for spider.."coppe". The Merriam Webster article that I was reading then went on to explain that the word 'cob', which refers to corn, comes from an entirely different middle English word, 'cobbe', meaning 'head'. This word was used to describe anything with a round shape, such as a corn cob. So it seems then that we have the origin for the name of the tool that we're all familiar with, the 'head knife'. Oh....and I did finally knock down that cobweb, literally, and figuratively. ;-)