Mike

Airbrush

8 posts in this topic

I have a couple of airbrushes that I bought years ago and never learned how to use. I'm not sure if they are set up correctly or even how to use them. When I try to use them following along with a book I have, I get fuzzy spots (the book says to practice spots). How do you guys control overspray?

What advice would you give someone? So far all my work is dyed/painted with brushes.

Mike

PS my airbrush says it is a Paasche VL set. The compressor is a Sprayit 2.5a model. These are both probably at least 10 years old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

setup depends on what you are spraying and what nozzle and needle you are using. that is a nice airbrush you have and it should work well for you.generally if you want cleaner work with less overspray the you need to use less air pressure and possibly a smaller nozzle/needle combination. you won't get a nice clean edge unless you mask our work with something also... your paint has to be real thin to spray properly

Edited by beezachoppa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, you need to thin paint or dyes down to milk consistency. The airbrush you have is a nice one and will last a lifetime if taken care of. This site has a lot of good information on using your airbrush and maintaining it. This site also contains good information for learning to airbrush. Like in leather work, practice is what will make you better.

Edited by tazzmann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike, if you're getting too much overspray, you need to turn the air pressure down. Airbrushes are something you really have to get aquainted with and like leather tooling.... practice, practice and more practice. Get a good regulator on your air line, between the compressor and the hose for the airbrush, and get some kind of moisture trap, cuz when you least expect it, your airbrush will spit out a drop of water with whatever else you're trying to spray. It can definately wreck your day.

If there's someplace on your project that you absolutely do not want overspray, you might try using liquid friskett. It brushes on and wipes off, though I'm not sure how it would work on leather. You might want to experiment there. Or you can get regular friskett, which is a plastic sheet with very low tack adhesive. You apply it, and use an exacto to carefully expose certain areas.

Almost forgot to add the previous posters were right when they say your liquid needs to be the consistency of milk. And make sure and clean the brush very thoroughly after using and plan on cleaning the needle tip a lot, depending on what you're spraying. Acrylics tend to dry on the tip a lot more than auto paints. :) I always kept a small container of solvent (water or laquer thinner) handy, with a small paint brush for cleaning the needle tip and nozzle when needed, and for cleaning the paint cup between colors.

My husband and I own a few airbrushes and I've experimented on saw blades and painted some cycle tanks for kicks. He mostly uses them at work on custom paint jobs.

Hope this helps.

Hilly

Edited by Hilly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the risk of sounding dumb. I recently came across an old Robb Barr ad for some airbrush product. In the picture he is holding the brush tip real close to the leather. I was surprised. You see, not only do I not know how to use one correctly, (I can get air and color out), I haven't seen one in use. I've never watched anyone use one so I don't have a feel for how. After seeing the ad, I'll try moving in closer.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
At the risk of sounding dumb. I recently came across an old Robb Barr ad for some airbrush product. In the picture he is holding the brush tip real close to the leather. I was surprised. You see, not only do I not know how to use one correctly, (I can get air and color out), I haven't seen one in use. I've never watched anyone use one so I don't have a feel for how. After seeing the ad, I'll try moving in closer.

Mike

Hi Mike.

No, you don't sound dumb!

Have you checked this out?

http://www.howtoairbrush.com/Lindex.htm There's lots of info here, plus links to other sources for learning.

Really, it's just like leatherwork - the more you practice, the better you get. I don't know of many people who can just pick up a brush and turn out a masterpiece off the line.

One word of warning: It can be extremely addictive!

I started out just fooling around on bike tanks, and ended up buying artist colors, and doing some portraiture. Very fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is an outstanding web site Hilly, for those of us that never used our airbrush (or never used it correctly).

How important is a paint booth and exhaust fan for airbrushing dye? For example, will there eventually be dye over my entire garage if I don't use booth and exhaust fan? Is the exhaust fan more for overspray or fumes?

Thanks,

Regis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That is an outstanding web site Hilly, for those of us that never used our airbrush (or never used it correctly).

How important is a paint booth and exhaust fan for airbrushing dye? For example, will there eventually be dye over my entire garage if I don't use booth and exhaust fan? Is the exhaust fan more for overspray or fumes?

Thanks,

Regis

I always just used a big box fan (on high) in the garage window, pointing out, and a way for fresh air to enter the garage. I set up my project right near the window with the fan. Although this is not the best idea while using laquer or other types of automotive paints (toxic fumes), it's fine for spraying artist types of acrylics while wearing a simple dusk mask. There's no toxic fumes with artist colors, and any overspray was directed towards the window. I never had a problem with it. Now if I was spraying with an oil based product, or cleaning with anything but soap and water, I'd wear a respirator (the kind used in a spray booth), along with eye protection and rubber gloves (watch out rubber gloves melt in a few minutes when in contact with solvents).

I wouldn't worry too much about the overspray all over the place, as long as you're careful about where you point that airbrush. Airbrushes generally do not spray HUGE quantities of paint! I'd also move my cars and motorcylcels etc. out, or cover them as a precaution.

Hilly

Edited by Hilly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now