impulse

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About impulse

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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Adelaide hills

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    harness/saddlery
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  1. I use an erasable silver pen for marking on leather - it just disappears with a damp cloth!
  2. I posted this recipe recently: I make my own "Bushmans Leather Dressing" by melting 1 part beeswax, 1 part parafin wax, 2 parts neatsfoot oil and 1tspn eucalyptus oil. The eucalyptus prevents mould. Because beeswax varies in hardness, sometimes I need to add pure gum turpentine to make the mix creamier. Use the dressing sparingly and after rubbing in well, leave for 30mins or so and it will leave the leather supple but can be buffed up to a satin shine which repells water. I never use straight oils on leather as too much oil can weaken the fibres and also makes it impossible to get a sheen. I have saddles and harness that are still good after 40yrs of service using this dressing.
  3. Use the existing fabric as patterns, but make sure you label which piece is from where. Calculate the sq footage needed, but because leather hides are an irregular shape, you need to allow 1/3 wastage. If the leather is of good quality there is no need to line with foam. I have successfully reupholstered 10-15 sofas and chairs using this method. Lois
  4. Hi windrider If you have access to an ordinary home sewing machine, there are available leather point needles which will handle garment leather quite well. Should save you hours of hand stitching. Good job with the lacing!From a fellow Aussie, Lois
  5. MADMAX The addition of eucalyptus oil is not to preserve the dressing, but to help stop mould growing on the leather!
  6. Both! I do a lot of embossing where the leather hardens due to casing and this dressing restores the natural oils. Saddlery I like to be very supple, and this is easily controlled by the amount used. Before discovering this recipe, I used warm olive oil to break in my gear, but found it impossible then to get a shine. Over the years I have tried almost all the commercially produced leather cleaners and dressings - NOTHING is as good or versatile as the "Bushmans". I hope that you try this out. Lois
  7. Hey Big Sioux I make my own "Bushmans Leather Dressing" by melting 1 part beeswax, 1 part parafin wax, 2 parts neatsfoot oil and 1tspn eucalyptus oil. The eucalyptus prevents mould. Because beeswax varies in hardness, sometimes I need to add pure gum turpentine to make the mix creamier. Use the dressing sparingly and after rubbing in well, leave for 30mins or so and it will leave the leather supple but can be buffed up to a satin shine which repells water. I never use straight oils on leather as too much oil can weaken the fibres and also makes it impossible to get a sheen. I have saddles and harness that are still good after 40yrs of service using this dressing. Cheers Lois
  8. Thanks for your comments, AussieMade and northmount
  9. I have recently been experimenting with using food coloring as a leather dye. It comes in 50ml bottles at any supermarket at a cost of around $1.25 ea. There are basic colors of pink, red, blue, green, yellow and black from which you can mix any color imaginable. It is water soluble and a few drops give strong color. I have found it to penetrate well and not rub off when dry. I advise prepping the leather with oxalic acid (1tspn in a cup of warm water) to give a clean start for an even finish. The dye can be painted on, rubbed on, dipped or sprayed. Strength of color is dependent on how many drops used.
  10. Here is more detail of the greyhound collar. Because their heads are no wider than their necks the design is such that when the lead is clipped on the collar tightens around the neck. It is lined with sheepskin. The color was an interesting experiment - to get purple I mixed pink and blue food coloring. To my surprise, the leather not only absorbed it well, but when dry did not rub off at all and was not affected by water. Leaves the door open for a much wider range of colors without using acrylic paint!
  11. OK - pic of "Karly" wearing her designer coat
  12. Capron Carter Industrial Sewing Machines have a branch in Perth and have parts for some antique and vintage machines
  13. I have recently re-homed a greyhound that was too slow on the race track. She is only 2yrs old and was otherwise destined to be euthanized. She has the sweetest temperament and lots to learn - didn't even know her name! I have made a martingale collar and matching dog coat.
  14. By far the best surface for punches is lead. I have melted down scrap lead to form a 8" x 4" x 1" thick rectangle. this is firm enough to get a sharp punch thru thick leather with one hit, yet soft enough to protect the tool. It works much better than a poly cutting board. When one side is marked up I just flip it over. This is great for hole punches, slot punches, strap end punches etc. About every 2-3 months I refresh the surfaces with another melt down, using a blow torch. Caution! Do not use your kitchen stove to heat lead! I have a butane camp stove which I use in the open air only. "Them green mats" (self-healing) are also my choice for cutting, and granite slab for tooling. Cheers, Lois
  15. Here is a custom halter made by a student of mine. It is made using 4mm harness leather (10oz). Always fold the leather when wet to avoid cracking and I always use stainless steel hardware. Make sure you use a quality leather dressing to restore the natural oils after the leather has dried from casing. Cheers, Lois