RusticLeatherShop

Acrylic aquarella paint used on leather edges!

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Hi,

I did what other Posters suggested and that is using aquarella painters paint (paper, cardboard, E.V.A. paint) for finishing leather edges.

It does not convince me yet but could be eventually an Option.

It is regular brazilian made acryllic paint for Schools and other paper paint Jobs (like for Rembrandt, van Gogh, etc).

First Picture is a first pass over with paint (red colour) over an semi burnished leather edge. It soaks in and does not be a shiny glossy layer of paint as in the thread about the chinese Genius of 250$-leather-wallet handcrafter we discussed before. It does not turn out as an shiny glase layer.

Second photo is were I sanded the edge again and that makes that the paint Comes off totally. (So sanding is not working).

Third Picture will be posted later wich Shows the painted, then sanded (paint Comes off), then repainted leather edge Surface. Does not convice me neighter.

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20180910_114914mod1.thumb.jpg.2eb88e6e6010b544a5ae7cff2c2a40e9.jpg20180910_122908mod1.thumb.jpg.72c06f561bf84521bb30e093164e89b6.jpg

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Here the Picture of the paint, materials used and the cellphone case which I tried it on.

20180910_114824mod1.thumb.jpg.36296f428f6de85ddd3f32ddd2d426c0.jpg

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You should not use a grinder to sand the edges!  Take some 100 grit and lightly sand after the first coat, then after 2nd coat lightly sand with 200 or 400 grit and repeat until you have the desired look.

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That doesnt work out IMHO neighter. That sanding takes off only the paint. Even if it's done by Hand. sanding paper equals to sanding Stone. The chinese guy must have used a Special paint. Rubber or ceramic based. Wouldnt be surprised if the chinese guy used a type of ceramic paint which hardens glossy.

But what I did is I had some textil paint (as well acryllic).

I tried with that and that gives a glossier finish. I had just White colour left of this textil paint but it has a more rubberized finish. I now let that textil paint dry and we will see how it turns out. It Looks more promising...

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Whilst edge paint is acrylic I would guess that the makers add a few things to thicken it whilst adding something to it to make it stick rather than just be absorbed into the leather like your appears to have done

What Gary is saying is to treat the edge very softly just give it a very fine rub over with fine sandpaper to make a slightly scratched edge so the second and further layers have something to stick to. Look at car paint shops the scrub the car with kitchen type cleaning pads to break the surface before repainting, everything is done gently so each layer has something to grip

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Sand the edge then paint, let dry, wet sand the edge, paint, dry, wet sand, paint, dry so on and so on until you the the smoothness you want out of a painted edge.

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5 hours ago, RusticLeatherShop said:

That doesnt work out IMHO neighter. That sanding takes off only the paint. Even if it's done by Hand. sanding paper equals to sanding Stone. The chinese guy must have used a Special paint. Rubber or ceramic based. Wouldnt be surprised if the chinese guy used a type of ceramic paint which hardens glossy.

But what I did is I had some textil paint (as well acryllic).

I tried with that and that gives a glossier finish. I had just White colour left of this textil paint but it has a more rubberized finish. I now let that textil paint dry and we will see how it turns out. It Looks more promising...

I give up!  Maybe best to leave the edges raw...

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look at my Picture regards "sanding" the paint.

The only Thing it does is sanding off the paint completely.

Yes the part regards of thickness of acryllic paint may be the secret. This one soaks in only and does not give an "layer".

I did first the rubberish fabric (textil) paint and then on top added again the acryllic aquarella paint. That seems to improve things.

I realised the rubber textil paint can be peeled off with time, but the acryllic aquarella paint is Long Lasting.

Maybe sanding the leather, aquarella painting, then textil painting, and then on top aquarella painting could do the trick.

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I did another Experiment. On cow leather it does not work well finishing with aquarella paint.

But on pig full grain leather the black Color aquarella paint is about the best finish even without sanding or burnishing (as Long as the sewn together leather edges are fairly even). The black aquarella paint matches well for darker pig leather edges. Maybe thats the way to go.

It's not as nice as the "chinese" guy made his edges as they were glossy and Kind of an ceramic appearance (most likely some rubberish paint), but at least this aquarella acryllic paint will not come off, while the rubber based fabric paint can be peeled off with some effort and for sure after a few years will peel off as does my faux leather chair's edges (which I realise just now it must be a heavy thick rubber paint edge finish. It peels off allmost entirely after half a year).

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This is the result of my testings today evening.

Left: the blue is an disguised pistol Smartphone Holster painted edges with blue acryllic aquarella paint. No to impressing but the blue Color improves the result.

Left Center: the red edge painted EDC Holster is first sanded, then painted red with aquarella then sanded (paint Comes off) then painted with textil (fabric) White rubberish paint, then painted over that red aquarella paint. Not to bad but yet not ideal.

Right Center: red edge painted Smartphone case. Sames as EDC Holster.

Left Center: black edge painted wallet. Painted edges with black aquarella paint. Not good results since layers of sewn together leather are distinguishable.

Center behind: black edge aquarella painted Mag Lite holder. This is full grain pig leather. Best result Overall. Could be a viable Option since I sanded the edges a bit and those are White from inside. The leather is factory dyed. I painted These with black aquarella paint. This gave the best result and is an good Option. Probably going this way since I plan to use anyways pig full grain leather only in the future. Just sand it till layers are even, then paint that black with aquarella paint and the result is satisfactory IMHO. (The photo makes the light holder look a bit different as it really is).

20180910_212521mod1.thumb.jpg.78a0cf6c328c61eaeec500c04525e8bb.jpg

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Here is a properly painted edge. This is my work. I used Fenice from Italy purchased at Tandy under their brand name Professional Leather Edge Paint . The leather is Horween Horse shoulder. The edges must be glued flush. Paint, let dry, lightly sand. Repeat using a higher grit sandpaper, repeat, repeat, repeat all the way to 1500 grit. Polish with paraffin wax.

paintedEdge.jpg

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That Looks very nice.

I dont use glue.

So basically that "ceramic look" is done by adding layer over layer of paint while between layers sanding.

How many times did you paint it then finally? How durable is it?

Basically the paint pigments/resins are added layer upon layer till reaching that result?

It must be a easier way to get to a nice result. Like sanding once and then painting for the same result.

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You might want to try a paint like this (see photos).

It is acrylic paint that after drying leaves a 3D effect - it should fill in any cracks between leather and form that bump on painted edge. It has that kind of rubbery feeling and after drying is completely flexible. I have tried it on paper and I can not unglue, I have tried bending and crumpling and the paint holds perfect. I picked it up in local craft shop.

P.S. I have tried it an a small piece of chrome leather but I am still waiting for it to dry.

IMG_20180911_102735-600x800.jpg

IMG_20180911_102726-600x800.jpg

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Interesting that italian paint.

If it feels rubberish, then IT IS probably rubber based.

As does my brazilian textil paint as well. That flexes as well and fills fairly well the gap between sewn together leather layers. But it could do better. IMHO any non hard paint will crack eventually over time.

I will make the effort and get some Brown and black fabric paint and see how that holds up. Maybe put a few layers so it gets closer to the ideal edge like fanninator showed here previously.

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When you sand the paint Rustic what grit sand paper are you using? Or are you using the stone? If the grit is under 100 then you are using too coarse of sand paper.

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I use the electric sand Stone. I believe it has the number 35 on it.

Nevertheless the acryllic aquarella paint is not giving any "layers" but more soaks into the leather. No layer Forming with that paint whatsoever. So even using an fine sand paper, I have nothing to sand at....

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See below the photo.

The thick White arrow Shows at my faux leather chair edge which has an (easy to peel off) rubberish finish.

The thin White arrow Shows at the pocket Holster leather edge put on 2 times the fabric rubberish paint (2 layers). That gives somewhat similar result as my chairs finish.

Maybe I buy only Brown and black textil paint and paint the edge 2 times over which will give a thicker layer and Looks a bit more professional.20180911_185308mod1.thumb.jpg.d5fb0b494c81cef947021d6600d4f27f.jpg

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I don't think your edges are prepped properly before you start painting them. They need to be nearly good on their own before you start painting. Edge finishing is a pretty well understood step and you seem to be resistant to listening to experience again @RusticLeatherShop.

You need to grab some scrap and practice. You have got to put in the time and effort applying the suggestions you solicited if you are wanting to get this figured out.

Cow leather, fish leather, dog leather....it should all yield a clean edge when painted if you take the time and execute properly. Nice clean cuts, some edge beveling, and some sanding and then paint, but you have to have your foundation right!

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1 hour ago, battlemunky said:

... , fish leather, ...., ....it should all yield a clean edge when painted

more douchebag I cant even imagine. Fish leather ...

1 hour ago, battlemunky said:

and you seem to be resistant to listening to experience again

Sounds like those gun Forum advises and internet-mall-ninja Posters whose solely Goal is to censure Forums Contents by repeatedly Claim and blaim other Posters they "do not listen to advice" and the like to start of an reaction of the OP in the hopes the moderator will ban his account.

I have shown in any measurable practical first Hand experience and leather pieces the results of those so appraised "advices".

I have found that often on Forums misleading info is posted which is just not repeatable once you try it yourself.

The cow leather I work with is about max 4 to 5 oz leather and even if I try to burnish it with an stick by Hand, it just bends over or turns it's edge away as such as no practical burnishing can be done with that.

However I can see how one could sucessfully burnish full grain belt leather (10 to 14 oz I guess). But suggesting I do not "follow any (shaddy) advice" if I dont manage to burnish 1 oz fish leather, is really beyond any reality.

One solution to get a "good enough" edge is to use Brown or black fabric paint and paint it twice. That way it gives a layer but not such a smooth Surface as Posters posted here. It seals however any uneven parts between sewn together leather and makes it somewhat less noticeable.

Maybe we have here in Southamerica just not the right paint for leather glossy smooth finish.

I'll see next month what construction retailers have in stock here. Maybe I find an suiting paint.

 

Edited by RusticLeatherShop

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1 hour ago, battlemunky said:

You need to grab some scrap and practice.

Sounds like the gun industry guys on gun Forums who Lure you into burning thousands of rounds in order to "practice", blaiming the shooter is a bad shot when the poorly costructed and designed pistol is in reality not Shooting straigth due to the gun industry wanting to save a dime. If the finish did not turn out ideal at the first, ceteris paribus, neighter the 1000's try will Change the endresult.

Propper paint, technique and Hardware can make any fool into an expert; but not repeating over and over the same mistake (by not having availlable the propper paint, technique or Hardware).

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SANDPAPER IS NOT THE SAME AS SANDSTONE!!!!!!!!!   You have not shown one time that you have followed the advice of even one member that has graciously taken the time to try to help. You continue to ignore and insult these kind people in your ignorance instead of trying their technique the way it is given.No one on this site will give advice in order to make you spend more money.

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My Italian 3D paint has dried but the results are too poor to even photograph it. I do think I am beginning to understand the principle behind it thought.

It is almost impossible to paint a perfect edge by just painting. The result is too rough and bumpy. The solution is to use fine sanding paper (1000) to actually shave off the bumps and achieve that nice even surface.

I can compare it with welding metal plates. Once the blow torch has welded two metal plates the line of the weld would be rough. So you use the grinder to grind the bumps, then use a fine grinder to make it flat, then polisher to make it look smooth and then paint to finally make it look like there is no welding at all.

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Try watching this video

 

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LetterT,

I totally second that what you said. Similar experiences I have done as well with my Experiment.

Seems that LetterT has real life experiences.

I'll get some fine sandpaper and see what I can approve with that by burnishing the edges. Maybe getting and wooden handheld burnisher as well from Amazon.com over time.

UPDATE: The fabric textil rubberish paint is Peeling off partly on my EDC pocket pistol Holster after 1 day use already. The aquarella paint is "bleeding" paint once it gets wet a bit from even touching it with sweaty Hands (I live in an hot climate were 100 degrees is not unusual during summer and hence people are sweating "like a pig"). I had yellow and red painted Hands today from handling that Smartphone case and EDC pocket pistol Holster (pockets are inside a bit sweaty and thus are painted a bit as well from the bleeding Holster).

I consider These 2 paint Options a fail!

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