Recommended Posts

Found an old wooden stool i used to sit on when i was a wee boy.

 

Leather top shows 3 sailing ships from Admiral Nelson’s time in the leather top.

 

A name is signed in the leather either Lavanga or Ravanga and wondered if anyone knew anything about the origins

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Noggin said:

Found an old wooden stool i used to sit on when i was a wee boy.

 

Leather top shows 3 sailing ships from Admiral Nelson’s time in the leather top.

 

A name is signed in the leather either Lavanga or Ravanga and wondered if anyone knew anything about the origins

Could you post a photo please?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not the best at posting pics on the internet I am afraid but I will try

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nina, Pinta, Santa Maria ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd take that to an antique dealer that specializes in furniture...does the antique roadshow ever come out there? You might be the next millionaire...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Antiques Roadshow was originally British..Arthur Negus.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Negus
The ships are too old to be from the time of Nelson..and have the red cross on the sails..the image is the same as the most common images of the Nina, Pinta, Santa Maria..of the 1st voyage of Christopher Columbus..
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Columbus
Images of the Nina, Pinta, Santa Maria..
https://lite.qwant.com/?q=Nina%20pinta%20santa%20maria&t=images

Edited by mikesc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The English flag (St George) is a Red Cross on a White background  and they appear to be involved in a battle and as we know the English were always fighting someone!!LOL

However I will take on board your knowledge of the Nina,Pinta and Santa Maria Mike!!

 

As for the Antiques Roadshow,yes Mark it sometimes comes to Scotland but mostly like everything else in Britain it is mainly in England...appreciate your comment but not holding my breath at being the world’s next millionaire.

 

That said I am in Las Vegas this November so if the stool doesn’t make me a millionaire maybe everything I own on Zero may just do it

Regards to ALL of you for taking the time to answer .....from Scotland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is n't "zero" the one where the house wins ?..I should know, having lived in Cannes and other parts of the Côte d'Azur where they have casinos, and even here in Brittany I'm only 4 kms from another, but have never set foot in one anywhere..Idea just does not appeal at all..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cross of St. George is an equal armed cross. The English never carried the cross on the sails, at any time.

Both the Spanish and Portuguese carried a cross on the sails. The Spanish used a red equal armed cross pattee outlined in gold, the Portuguese Cross of Christ is a red voided equal and straight armed cross pattee, used post 1313

I think the design is just a fantasy design using stereotypical elements, eg the ships are of a style of late 18th C 3rd rate ships. Too many sails for the actual N, P, S/M but not for a stereotypical drawing of them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that info Fred,BUT do you have any idea who signed the leather,where they were from or what period the stool may be from?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats harder than sorting out the fact and fiction of your mr Wallace guy in Brave Heart :lol::lol::lol:

Edited by chrisash

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Noggin said:

Thanks for that info Fred,BUT do you have any idea who signed the leather,where they were from or what period the stool may be from?

The name has an Italian thing about it. As you are in Scotland I would assess that it was done by a local Italian in Scotland. For those who do not know; Scotland and Northern Ireland became home for very many Italians. The rivets/upholstery nails around the edge are rather like the type and in position typical of the 1920s & 30s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now