Alamo

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About Alamo

  • Rank
    Member

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.WestEastArmory.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    San Antonio, Texas
  • Interests
    Shooting, hunting, fencing, guns, knives, ballroom dance, leathercraft

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Belts and small items
  • Interested in learning about
    Holsters, sheathes, and everything leather

Recent Profile Visitors

2,115 profile views
  1. Being my first try at a Ranger Belt, I'm quite pleased with how this one turned out! About 1500 stitches went into this beast, and the three layered billets were super fun to make (and my favorite part of this build). If I could do this again, I'd skive the belt down more at the ends where they overlap, and move the stitching that attaches the billets to the belt further back as well. Not a style that I would have tried to make on my own accord, but I'm glad that I got the chance to make one! https://www.flickr.com/gp/138400355@N06/KE2Ea4
  2. I did a quick google search, and all I came up with were pictures of hand saws. Would you mind posting some pictures of the one you have?
  3. Unfortunately, that is a crank type splitter. I'll be in the market for one of those sometime in the future, but not right now. Thanks for the heads up though!
  4. Howdy friends, So I'm in the market for a bench type splitter to skive down my belt ends. I'd like a high quality machine, and I'm willing to pay for one. I would buy a Campbell Randall Keystone new, but they are apparently moving locations and cannot sell any splitters for a few months until they are caught up with their current backorders. So the only real requirement that I have is that the splitter has to be in good working condition which would include the ability to split right out of the box, and that the split depth can be adjusted and locking into a specific setting. Other than that, I'm open to whatever pattern splitters can help me work my strap goods. I'm most familiar with the model 84 pattern, but I hear that chase pattern splitters can also fulfill my needs. I can pay via credit/debit card or PayPal, and I'm located in San Antonio, Texas 78209. Thanks in advance!
  5. Not without a soft surface under what I'm punching
  6. I'm not disagreeing with you, but I use the stacks of leather, and occasionally a small poly board on top of my granite to punch on. The edges of the tools never touch the granite, so I'm not exactly sure why pounding on a different surface would make a difference. If you have a link to your longer explanation, I'd be interested in reading it. The belt punches look like a long round tube, while the drive punches have a sort of shelf look to them and are more square at the handle.
  7. Yeah, about those..
  8. I like making orthographic and isometric drawings!
  9. I like using pen and paper for custom orders, but when making patterns or templates for things that will be made over and over again, the precision of using a computer/machine is quite handy.
  10. Google sketchup is a great starting program, and don't forget to download some of the extra features that make it more powerful.
  11. It's not so much that the patterns are difficult to make otherwise, but it's the program I know best, and allows me the most unrestricted method of digitally making a pattern.
  12. I like to use Dassault Systems CATIA, it's complicated as hell, but the degree of freedom it gives you is incredible. If you have access to a 3D printer, yo ucan also make STL files and get them printed.
  13. I'm not sure I follow your logic. Just like how it's awesome for tooling, all the energy you use to hit the punch will go to the punch cutting through the leather, so you should need to use less force to make a clean punch. In any case, I'm just looking for some drive punch alternatives to Tandy
  14. I'm personally leaning away from a changeable head punch set, I'd rather have a separate punch for each hole size I need. I have sharpened the tandy punches in the past, but the metal is cheap and I don't think they're heat treated properly, so they go dull on me quite quickly. My punching surface is a few layers of scrap veg tan over granite, I don't think there's a surface that is more forgiving to punches than that. The jewelers files is something I'll definitely have to look into though, I currently have lots of fine grit sand papers to do my sharpening, but some tricky places on pricking irons might benefit greatly from those types of files.