Semperfidelis354

Usmc Wwii 1911 Holster Template

14 posts in this topic

Hello all. I'm brand new to leather working and am trying to see if anyone happens to have a template for the WW2 1911 holsters. I'm going to start with a couple pancakes but would really like one of these as well. Any help on the matter would be great! Thank you!

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The most common holster in use during WW2 by Marines, as well as Army and other forces, was the US M1916 Model Dismounted pistol holster. That model remained virtually unchanged from 1916 to the 1980's, although changing from russet tan to black in the mid-1950's when the US Army changed to black gear.

I don't know of a source for a pattern or template, but there are many thousands of GI surplus holsters available and frequently seen on eBay and other sites. If you really wish to make one you should be able to acquire an original to strip down and replicate the pattern.

Most of the original WW1 and WW2 production holsters have a good demand from collectors, and prices may range up to $200-plus for those in excellent condition and/or from certain producers. Later production pieces, such as Vietnam era and later, can be purchased for relatively small investment, frequently less than $20.00.

There are also a number of companies producing replicas of the originals at varying prices. Some are well made and others are basically junk.

Reproducing the original pattern will require a source for the wire belt hanger and Sam Browne-style stud fastener for the flap (which will also require the installation tools). Duplicating those parts may be the most challenging part of your project.

The other commonly used holsters during WW2 were the US M3 shoulder holster, and a very few US M7 shoulder holsters (reportedly a special order for the US Marine Corps). Again, originals are in good supply (and also in high demand, especially when found in original and excellent condition), and several companies are offering replicas based (more or less) on the original patterns.

The US M3 and M7 shoulder holsters also utilized some specialized hardware including the "pull the dot" style fastener on the retaining strap, and the adjustment buckle on the shoulder strap(s). Again, finding appropropriate hardware may be a challenge.

Personally, I would scour eBay and other auction sites in search of original items, which will have and retain a genuine collector value, whereas a replica will never have significant value.

All of my WW1 and WW2 era M1911 and M1911A1 pistols have been outfitted with original period-correct holsters, belts, pouches, etc, that I have located on-line. I would look in that direction before I started thinking about making replicas.

Best regards.

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Thanks for the info! I didn't know that much about them only that I liked the look with the 1911

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Idid one but modified it for the M9. Snaps are not Lift o snap/lift o dot. But the ones I used serve their purpose until I get the others ordered. My chest strap I made one width instead of tapering it.

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Tying into this, I've been drooling over some western style gunleather recently, and got a wild idea in my head, I'm curious, if I stripped one of these holsters down to replicate a pattern, and then expanded the pattern to build a cowboy holster to house a 1911, would I be met with success? Or am I missing a key function here that makes cowboy holsters only effective for wheelguns?

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Tying into this, I've been drooling over some western style gunleather recently, and got a wild idea in my head, I'm curious, if I stripped one of these holsters down to replicate a pattern, and then expanded the pattern to build a cowboy holster to house a 1911, would I be met with success? Or am I missing a key function here that makes cowboy holsters only effective for wheelguns?

Chuck Burrows - one of the real experts that hangs around here - did a BEAUTIFUL western style 1911 rig for a friend of mine. The 1911 was a very popular gun among the Border Patrol folks years back when they furnished their own rigs and western style holsters were not uncommon.

In fact, Al Stohlman's "How to Make Holsters" has a western style 1911 pattern in it.

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Western holsters for the 1911 are very popular right now. They are called wild bunch holsters and rigs from the SASS shoots. I have been building a lot of them for the 1911 and other large autos for outdoorsman and hunters. Here are a couple the I just finished.

post-7445-062182100 1305295703_thumb.jpg

post-7445-073416800 1305295797_thumb.jpg

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[...]

So it looks like I just build a standard western holster but size it appropriately for a 1911. Cool. Thanks for the responses.

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Tying into this, I've been drooling over some western style gunleather recently, and got a wild idea in my head, I'm curious, if I stripped one of these holsters down to replicate a pattern, and then expanded the pattern to build a cowboy holster to house a 1911, would I be met with success? Or am I missing a key function here that makes cowboy holsters only effective for wheelguns?

I tried making what I'd refer to as a "Wild Bunch" style holster for a 1911. I thought it turned out pretty well.

IMG_1238.jpg

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I tried making what I'd refer to as a "Wild Bunch" style holster for a 1911. I thought it turned out pretty well.

Yes it did!

Edited by TexasJack

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To keep the post on subject:

If you frequent gun shows, you can find a used military 1911 holster for 30 bucks or so. I have one made in 1918, but its missing the flap, so it became a pattern. I have another good one from '44 that was dyed black in the 50s. I used it for the flap portion of my pattern. I think the hardest part will be the wooden block inside the holster, as well as the wire hanger.

AND to derail the post again:

The Wildbunch rigs are cool, and are getting very popular. Many folks are wanting a military version to go with their outfits, but the western style is popular too. The easiest one is the one in the Stohlman How to Make HOlsters book. Build it as is, and maybe cover the trigger guard if your range requires it.

Here is my latest Wild Bunch rig. It is antiqued, but will end up more so when I start using it.

post-7450-046172100 1305608256_thumb.jpg

Edited by DaltonMasterson

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I hate to derail this thread anymore but I'm glad I checked back in on it. I recently acquired a 'Wild Bunch' style holster that was ragged out, $4 at a show and I like the design. I take it over to my grandad's to show it to him since I thought he might like it and he liked to of talked my ear off about this movie with William Holden in it (I'm a young guy, never seen it). I appreciate the pictures posted in this thread as they give me some good ideas of my own. Sometimes a thread derail is just what you need to get the creative gears a'turnin.

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Here is my latest Wild Bunch rig. It is antiqued, but will end up more so when I start using it.

Hey I saw it in the Packing Iron book!! Congratulations!!

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