doorty

Leather strength for a given weight?

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Is there a rule of thumb for the the strength of leather at a given thickness/weight?

For instance, if I had a belt with a buckle, how much weight could the belt support before ripping the hole.  The same question applies to stitching connecting two pieces of leather or the rings and clips.

My use case is mostly around motorcycles, but I'm sure a similar situation arises for horse saddles and other heavy duty situations.

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The belly section of the hide will not be as strong as the shoulder/back, yet be the exact same thickness/weight. So I'd say there is not "a rule of thumb for the the strength of leather at a given thickness/weight." 

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Besides the area of the animal where the leather came from, there are other variables that might improve of reduce the strength, breaking strain or shear properties of leather. Defects from scars, imperfect tanning methods, uneven hide thickness for whatever reason.

If you consider a different hide or a different tannery or a different country of manufacture, I think the variables could become almost uncountable.

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to re-inforce what has been said already; I have some 1.5mm/2mm cow veg tan which I can rip apart like cloth, but I also have some 0.6mm/0.8mm deer skin leather which I cannot rip apart at all

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Thanks guys. I guess you just look at what others have done. Based on the original post, it looks like about 1" straps of 6oz leather with brass/copper hardware should hold to a moving motorcycle.

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Rather than the strength of the leather, the wear of the leather may be more important where it constantly moves around

You could always test the strength of the leath sample by hanging weights on it say 2 or 3 times what you expect the person to use and dont forget outdoor use has other requirements maybe harness leather

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I think it's going to depend a lot on both the tannage and the species; I've been told that kidskin is stronger than cow leather, and kangaroo is the strongest thing you can get for a given weight.  I'd like to say that the finer-grained leathers tend to be stronger for a given thickness, but I don't know if that's universally true.

However, stretch is also a factor - the cost of having a material with high tensile strength might be a tendency to accommodate the extra strain by stretching.

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