austinious

What Hand Stichers are out there?

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Hi, first post...

So, I bought a Singer 401a like a dope and of course it doesn't go through more than garment weight.

I started to read some of the sticky posts and realized that portable machines won't work.

Is there a hand sticher other than the Tippmann Boss out there?  I have no problem with the Boss, but it is rather expensive for a manual machine.

 

Thanks

Austinious

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Cowboy has a manually operated harness stitcher that is just being seen in North America, called The Outlaw. It is supposed to be  similar to the Boss in capacity. Ask your Cowboy dealer if he has one in stock yet. There are banner ads on top of each page for our supporting suppliers, brands and dealers.

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Have you thought about actually real hand stitching? I have two leather sewing machines and still hand stitch all the time.

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Wizcrafts, Thanks I'll look for my local dealer.

KingsCounty, I hand stitch right now, I was thinking of expanding, but maybe I'll stick with handstitching for awhile.

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There are a few hand operated leather machines on the market, in Australia our Cowboy brand does a CB2500HC (hand crank), a CB3200HC (hand crank) and we are now awaiting the arrival of our Cowboy Outlaw machines.   However there are other makers, some that comes to mind are the Luberto machine,5a39cf53e37f1_cowboyCB105handcrank.thumb.jpg.5a96b6d342306e269bd6b3d118aabeee.jpg the Pearson (BUSMC) No 6, and the Boss.

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Singermainia (Steve) you need to start paying me royalties on that photograph LOL

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35 minutes ago, Darren Brosowski said:

Singermainia (Steve) you need to start paying me royalties on that photograph LOL

haha, can you prove its yours... I'll have to reverse litigate for all the ones you've stolen from me....   nice to have a sense of humour...

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On 4/30/2018 at 7:29 PM, austinious said:

Wizcrafts, Thanks I'll look for my local dealer.

KingsCounty, I hand stitch right now, I was thinking of expanding, but maybe I'll stick with handstitching for awhile.

Austin,  I've been HS for years and finally decided to learn to use the treadle/hand crank/ motor compatible Pearson no. 6  before my fingers give out. 

When the machine gets here you are more than welcome to come over and try it out of you are still looking at options.

Jeff over in East Texas.

 

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Since hand operated machines are being discussed.  I wonder why no company seems to have made a machine other then the 29k ( patcher ) style machine with the flywheel on the front.  They would be SO MUCH easier to use then with it on the end like the one pictured.  Doesn't seem like it would have taken that much more machineing .I realize now most machines are motorized but a lot of the older machines were built when power was not available to everybody like it is now.

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I  have heard rumors that Weaver Leather is redesigning the Luberto Wyndham Cub hand crank machine for sale early next spring.  should be in their catalog!    I have a Luberto #9 and it sews through everything I put under it.

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10 hours ago, catskin said:

  I wonder why no company seems to have made a machine other then the 29k ( patcher ) style machine with the flywheel on the front.

SIL10-2753-076a.thumb.jpg.9c60eb0568c3e9dd6cd0f791ca825094.jpg20181202_125530.thumb.jpg.4d24c7d149ae9d3212535037fc9e8329.jpg

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I wonder why the old foot pedal power...like the first sewing machine haven't been designed for leather stitching..

Or have I missed something on the market now.

Craig h

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, jimi said:

[pictures]

Has someone out there actually SEEN a 45K71 with the side handwheel? I'm curious about the mechanics involved, as the photo seems to suggest a picture of that handwheel sort of floating in space...  ??  It must use an external bevel gear that just engages the rear mounted handwheel....

 

-DC

45K71_SW.jpg

Edited by SARK9

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1 hour ago, SARK9 said:

I'm curious about the mechanics involved

Hi Sark9, Here is the parts manual so you can see how the wheel is mounted.http://leatherworker.net/forum/topic/76114-singer-45k68/?tab=comments#comment-502500

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Jimi,  I stand corrected.  But it seems that it would have been a good idea for a lot more of the older machines to have had it done. Even now with powered machines it would be a lot easier when you have to make just a few stitches.  The old harness machines  Pearson, Landis #1 and maybe others had them.  So the lighter machines would have been handy that way to.

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17 hours ago, catskin said:

I wonder why no company seems to have made a machine other then the 29k ( patcher ) style machine with the flywheel on the front.  They would be SO MUCH easier to use then with it on the end like the one pictured.  Doesn't seem like it would have taken that much more machineing .I realize now most machines are motorized but a lot of the older machines were built when power was not available to everybody like it is now.

Many of the old machines (before electric power was commonly laid on in small premises) were built with/for treadle stands. Many of these treadles were discarded after motors were added at a later date. Plus it's easy to forget that 100 years ago, just as today, industrial sewing machines were designed and built primarily for use in factories rather than at home or in small workshops. Many sewing machines of this era were offered with clutches to be powered from a common line shaft, which was turned by a prime mover -- a steam engine, water wheel or a single large electric motor, which was common practice well into the last century.

Try sewing a while with only one hand to guide the work and you'll realise why very few industrial machines were intended to be powered by hand -- even with a front wheel the ergonomics are far from ideal. Only about half of the 29K subclasses were made with front-wheels -- the extra gearing added cost and probably friction -- but there were others. There were various Pearson/BUSM machines (most famously the No.6) and patchers like the Bradbury A1 with front wheels. In these cases the front-facing wheel was more than a convenience or a flywheel mass -- the rear face of the wheel had several cam tracks machined into it, which directly drove several parts. This was the source of the machine's timing, rather than the top shaft as is more common these days.

The only modern machines I can think of with front wheels are derivatives of old designs (various Chinese patchers and Luberto No.9). There is also, to my mind, a safety/liability issue -- front-mounted wheels are a bit more of a fingerbiter than side-mounted and are harder to put guards around, which are required in the workplace in many countries.

7 hours ago, keplerts said:

I  have heard rumors that Weaver Leather is redesigning the Luberto Wyndham Cub hand crank machine for sale early next spring.  should be in their catalog!    I have a Luberto #9 and it sews through everything I put under it.

That sounds promising -- I've been thinking about a Luberto Cub for a while but would want to modify it to some sort of battery-powered motor rather than going further down the hand-crank route.

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" Try sewing a while with only one hand to guide the work and you'll realise why very few industrial machines were intended to be powered by hand" .

When I got my 117 working it seemed like a great idea to fit a handle to the large pulley I fitted, so no motor needed. It didn't take me long to realise that unless I could grow a third hand it wasn't very practical.:lol:

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We commonly fit hand crank handles to the Cowboy CB2500 and CB3200, additionally there is now the Cowboy Outlaw.   In older machines some 29k had them, older Durkopp and of course the Pearson no 6 and Landis no 1.

I thought we'd had just about every 45K model thru our workshop and showroom, but never one with a front mounted handwheel !!

 

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We had a lot of requests for a hand crank 3200, so we now offer this: 

http://www.solar-leather.com/cowboy-cb3200-hand-crank/

 

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The only problem i see (like many things these days) is that it looks as if we are going backwards instead of forwards, the good thing was having the wheel in front of you which was comfortable but the only thing they have done now is to put a handle on the flywheel which is facing backwards!! That to me is not comfortable for sewing, especially if you have short arms :lol:

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Hand cranking standard end flywheel machines like the 2500 and 3200 is fine and we do both here at Cowboy Leather Machines in Australia, it only takes a minute or two to get used to the motion.   However as you say it will really only work on short bed machines, you cant really hand crank a cowboy CB4500.

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I think one small advantage of the handcrank on the end flywheel is that you are cranking in the same plane, wheras with front wheels the rotation is not the same direction as the sewing.

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