• Content count

  • Joined

  • Last visited

About zAZ90

  • Rank
    New Member

Contact Methods

  • ICQ

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling

LW Info

  • How did you find
    google search
  1. I've made several strop boards with leather glued on, etc., so I'm acquainted with the technique. The 20" blade must be stropped on both sides so passing a strop through the machine is not an option. I appreciate the information.
  2. Presume this is the statement you are referring to: "I have been using the Artisan 20" splitter I picked up this spring. The blade might be 20" but there is a guide bar in front of the blade that restricts the largest piece at 17&3/4"." I had read this post before I ordered the splitter and when I spoke with Jerry at Artisan I asked him about it. He explained that you lift up the guide bar and place the leather beneath it. I could easily see how someone could mistake the guide bar as a feeding chute for the maximum leather width as many older machines are thus constructed. I'm located in Indiana, USA, but still the shipping was very swift. I've ordered small items from California that took much longer. If there is a way for you to get the machine shipped to you I believe you would like it. I am very impressed. I am presently trying to figure out how to strop the blade as Jerry recommended. I have a post asking for help but no replies. I may call Jerry and ask him for a method. The blade is so big that it may be difficult. I'm considering some sort of jig to help with the process. I have several types of strops, big and small.
  3. I just purchased an Artisan LS-1020 splitter in early January 2013. They shipped to me immediately and I had the splitter in three work days up and running. The statement above indicating the "...maximum is about 17 3/4 due to way the blade sits there..." is incorrect. The machine will, in fact, split a 20" wide piece of leather as I have done it. The blade is a little wider than 20". The feed weight lever (don't know any ofther name for it) goes down on top of the leather and does not limit the width of the leather being split. The machine works very well and is much more accurate than I figured it would be. I've probably already split 50-60 square feet of leather with it.
  4. Type of dye could be problem. Doubt if age would hurt it. Professional oil dye works best for me. Deglazing leather with the potent deglazing chemical first might help. Also, application with a swab made of wool felt. I use pieces of 3/4" thick industrial felf for dye when I'm doing a larger area. Hope this helps you in some small way. Like a wise man once told me "One can learn something from a man who is doing things incorrectly--you learn how NOT to do it.!"
  5. I recently purchased an Artisan LS-1020 Splitter. I was wondering if anyone could give me any hints on how to strop the 20"+ blade. It is sharpened on both sides which makes it a bit unwieldy. I took the blade off this evening to check it since I've given the machine considerable use. It was still very sharp so I didn't mess with it for now. Would appreciate any help. I'm very pleased with the performance of the LS-1020 so far and will likely sell a couple of my crank splitters. The Artisan is very accurate and easy to use.