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Holzmann   

Hello all, I've recently started using 50/50 (by weight) beeswax/neatsfoor polish I brewed up myself and I have a few questions; My resulting finish is quite hard and applying it with my fingers as recommended in other posts is rather difficult. Aside from warming it up, is there a way to tweak the formula to bring it to a consistency more like shoe polish? Perhaps increase the amount of neatsfoot? Also, I've been thinking about making some up in quantity. Are there any long(ish) term storage issues I need to consider? I have access to new quart cans (unused paint cans). Any reason not to use one as my melting/storage vessel?

Thanks in advance,

Nat

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I did 50/50 by weight and its the consistency of really thick tooth paste. Softer than shoe polish. Id add a little more neatsfoot oil at a time till it softens up. Since it will need to cool in order to tell put a little on a cold spoon to cool it down fast to see how firm it is. Id start with 1/8 part more oil. If you used a cup each add 1 oz by weight to see if that works. increase as needed. A new can should be ok to store it in.

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I use a 3 part mixture that contains beeswax, paraffin and neatsfoot oil. The paraffin keeps it from hardening up too much without requiring the use of a lot of oil. I melt mine up in an old pot and pour it into jelly jars.

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When you mention "paraffin" I assume you are referring to liquid paraffin and not wax?

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No, block paraffin wax found at the grocery store in the food canning section. Usually under the brand "Gulf Wax".

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footrat   

If you're doing large batches of this, Hobby Lobby and other stores have slabs of beeswax and parafin wax. They also have jars for storage.

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No, block paraffin wax found at the grocery store in the food canning section. Usually under the brand "Gulf Wax".

Interesting, the paraffin wax here (Australia), is actually HARDER than the bees wax. Hence my question about the liquid paraffin.

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Matt S   

I have noticed differences between paraffin waxes sed in candles. Melting down one batch of yealights resulted in a crumbly crystalline mess.

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Randy- This mixture is used to treat sheaths/holsters and other leather goods to be extremely water resistant. You can apply it any number of ways, I apply mine hot (not hot enough to burn you) to an already warmed sheath. It will drink up a bunch of the mixture and harden some as it does.

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Are you guys using this as a final finish? I'm not happy with the recent results of some of the mop and glo or super sheen. And I cut both with water 50/50. Looking at other finish options now. Thanks.

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Yes it is my final finish. Although, if I want a bit more shine I will apply a coat of Neutral Kiwi polish.

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Craig,

Thanks. A bit more searching after I posted told me the same thing. I worked up a batch today. It seems to have a consistency close to my saddle soap. It gives when I push on it in the egg crates. I have a couple holsters in the works and I'm going to use this for the finish. I'm not big on shiny. It's just easier to beat up IMO.

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So, is this finish good for protecting the dye from rubbing off on clothes or is there a different sealing finish that works better for that? Still new to this and discovering the pitfalls of some of the readily available finishes at the store. Thanks.

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Dorado   

So, is this finish good for protecting the dye from rubbing off on clothes or is there a different sealing finish that works better for that? Still new to this and discovering the pitfalls of some of the readily available finishes at the store. Thanks.

It should. I've used a similar mix on my back quiver. Heat the wax mix and warm the leather and apply mix in a circular fashion working it in as you go. Once dried heat again with a heat gun or hair dryer so that the leather absorbs as much as possible. Then let cool and buff with a soft cloth to remove excess. I did that and never had a problem with my quiver even with my sweating, movement, and weather conditions.

One thing though, if you are applying to dyed leather, let the dye dry and cure for a day or two before applying.

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24VOLTS   

I use a similar mixture of bee's wax, paraffin and neats foot oil for burnishing wax. I have even tried adding dye to mixture for burnishing. It did not work as I hoped.

I like to use Obenauf's for sealing leather after dying. It seals, protects and does not change the color of leather.

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Thanks. I imagine this has been hashed and rehashed from every angle imaginable. I appreciate the help.

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Dorado   

I usually use SnoSeal for my leather things that are outdoors equipment, boots, belts, quivers, holsters, whatever. If it's goes outside it gets SnoSeal. All that SnoSeal is is beeswax, conditioning oil and an emulsifier to act as a carrier to penetrate the leather. Beeswax provides an excellent seal that doesn't stink or rot like many others, adding neatsfoot oil works as a conditioner and a protection agent.

I tend to avoid synthetic seals as they usually fail me. I had a nice holster that was sealed with some ultra modern job promising the world. It lasted half of a camping trip before flaking off and trapping water inside the leather causing rot to happen. That's never happened since I started using beeswax seals albeit SnoSeal or homemade mix.

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Dwight   

I was given the recipe by a wonderful lady in either Oregon or Washington state several years ago, . . .

I use it for my "special" stuff, . . . if it has to be "old timey" or something like that. My parade rig has it on it.

From what she said, . . . it is an old, . . . old recipe, . . . been used for a long, long time.

The other finish I use, . . . is Resolene.

May God bless,

Dwight

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Dorado   

Dwight I don't suppose you'd be willing to share that recipe with the rest of the class now would you?

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Dwight   

Dwight I don't suppose you'd be willing to share that recipe with the rest of the class now would you?

Really easy, Dorado, . . . measure it by weight, . . . equal portions of virgin beeswax (make sure it is not some garbage manufactured beeswax product), . . . and neetsfoot oil.

I put them in a jar, . . . set the jar in a $10 crock pot from Goodwill, . . . turn it on high, . . . come back in an hour or so, . . . make sure it has all melted together and is only liquid, . . . swish it around in the jar to make sure it is well mixed, . . . pour out the concoction into a muffin pan lined with muffin papers, . . . and when it cools, . . . I've got it.

A dab more of wax and it'll be a bit more solid, . . . a dab more oil, . . . it'll be more squishy, . . . but both work well.

I'd actually do everything with it if I thought my customer's would put up with it, . . . but most of them have been trained to expect the plastic type finish, . . . so I give them Resolene.

A few of them get this treatment, . . .

May God bless,

Dwight

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Dorado   

Really easy, Dorado, . . . measure it by weight, . . . equal portions of virgin beeswax (make sure it is not some garbage manufactured beeswax product), . . . and neetsfoot oil.

I put them in a jar, . . . set the jar in a $10 crock pot from Goodwill, . . . turn it on high, . . . come back in an hour or so, . . . make sure it has all melted together and is only liquid, . . . swish it around in the jar to make sure it is well mixed, . . . pour out the concoction into a muffin pan lined with muffin papers, . . . and when it cools, . . . I've got it.

A dab more of wax and it'll be a bit more solid, . . . a dab more oil, . . . it'll be more squishy, . . . but both work well.

I'd actually do everything with it if I thought my customer's would put up with it, . . . but most of them have been trained to expect the plastic type finish, . . . so I give them Resolene.

A few of them get this treatment, . . .

May God bless,

Dwight

Here I was thinking it was something special or unique. :rolleyes: lol

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huffdad   

I love the 50/50 beeswax/neatsfoot oil. It's my preferred finish. I wish I could figure out a way to use it on a sheridan style resist instead of using acrylic/lacquer.

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I have a small two-quart crock pot in my shop in which I keep a neetsfoot oil/beeswax mixture. I mix mine up with a lot more oil than wax. When cold, the mixture has the consistency of pancake batter. I can't tell you what the actual ratio is... when the pot runs low I just add more oil and more wax. If I had to guess, I think the ratio is about 4 parts oil and 1 part wax.

So, every morning when I show up at the shop I turn on the crock pot to let the mixture heat up.

All my holsters, sheaths, and belts are finished with this mixture. I use it on saddles, too. I've never used anything else. After the mixture dries I buff it with a soft cloth. When I want a bit more shine I apply a coat of neutral Kiwi shoe polish.

I know there are a lot of other ways to finish leather and I'm sure many of them are excellent. This is the system I use and it's worked well for me. None of my customers have complained yet.

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01046   

For the three part mixture (parrafin/beeswax/neatsfoot) change the color of neutral or white thread?

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