suzelle

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About suzelle

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  • Gender
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  • Location
    The Great Northwest
  • Interests
    Sewing Printing Painting Fixing

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Experimenting Now
  • Interested in learning about
    Everything Art!
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    searching for info on industrial sewing machines

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  1. Well Congrats to you! Yes, I'd say you got a good deal if you were able to get it sewing perfectly! Post a pic if you can. Happy for you!
  2. By the way, is that a reverse lever I see? If so, do you think it was added after machine was made? Just wondering, because it appears that it's one of those military issued machines, but I don't think it is. The knob that looks like reverse lever looks a lot like my Pfaff's lever. (?) Just curious. If it had reverse, that would of course make it much more desirable for sure! What kind of price would you put on it? Good for you for being able to part with it, I know you said you don't need another machine. They really are fun to fix, aren't they? Whoever gets it will be so happy with it.
  3. Wow! That looks fantastic! I'm glad you were able to make it sew better than it was doing. If you end up selling it, the new owner will only have to deal with some basic adjustments and/or parts to get it stitching just right. Or, they may even have a machine already to put in it's place! That drop down table is a real plus for anyone using the machine in a small space. Great work!
  4. Not to put any pressure on you, but how's the restoration going? Have you almost got her all put together? Can't wait to see her all dressed up with the badge and pins and all the parts back together!
  5. Congrats on the Seiko!
  6. Eric, This is great stuff, thank you! My machines thank you too!
  7. Great! Can't wait to see that!
  8. Forgot, guess I did install a servo a while back, way back! I had forgotten about it because it died on me fairly quickly so I haven't been to keen on servo type motors since. The machine I had it on I no longer own, my first walking foot machine. But that was when servo motors first came out and it sounds like they are being made better now, so I'm ready to try another. My main machine that I use these days is an older Pfaff 545 with large bobbin, made about 1979. A fantastic machine in like new condition, it's a monster! I like the motor that is on it, but it's an old clutch type and goes like the wind. I'd like to put a servo on it to slow it down when sewing finer detail stuff. What I sew with that old Pfaff is mostly thick canvas/tarp, banner material, and sunbrella. With a servo motor, I would use it for leather clothing items and handbags.
  9. Maybe he meant vintage handbag for a woman (?) But hey, vintage women are okay too!
  10. Thanks for that information Bob! Much appreciated. I will be contacting you.
  11. Oh boy, no pictures or diagrams to help explain. Joe, have you ever installed a sewing machine motor before? I've installed a few, but not a servo yet. Hopefully someone can chime in who has installed motors like yours. Can you describe what part of install has you the most puzzled?
  12. Cowboy Bob, I know this is an older thread, but I have the same machine as gavingear and am about to replace the original motor. Nothing wrong with the motor, I just want one that I can run slower, when desired. I run it fast sewing long seams, but would love to be able to do more intricate work and therefore need a more appropriate motor, a more modern one. When the servo motors first came out, I bought one for another machine I had at the time. But it died on me after only months of using it. I know the servo motors have evolved since then and they seem more affordable, depending on what you get of course. What would you suggest for my Pfaff 545 High lift? Thanks ahead!
  13. Hockeymender, Found the manual I think, is this it? http://www.yhhism.com/NW/archive/file/SV-71_Ver1A.pdf I have to admit, I find some of my manuals are hard to understand, especially my SWF embroidery machines, made in Korea. Much of the "English" version of the instructions are very broken, difficult to understand, or incorrect because of poor translation. Drives me crazy
  14. Super cute! Love that Chimayo style.