hidepounder

Finishing Edges

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On 7/25/2017 at 11:36 AM, Jimmy McLaughlin said:

With all the talk being about doing edge work, I have to say that Hidepounder has one of the best edge markers I have ever tried. He is to modest to mention it. It is a plastic tube about 5 to 6 inches long with a felt tip and I think it has a marble inside that keeps the dye flowing. You put your own dye in it and paint it on the edge. It is very neat and works like a charm. Thank you Bob for a great product.

Jim

Edge Marker-640.jpg

Jimmy,

I'm glad you like the product and thanks for the mention!

Best!

Bobby

 

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Hi, everyone!

I read the tutorial and it is quite straightforward. I applied to one of my veg tanned leather project and worked wonders... not to the level of Bob's finishing, but close enough for me to call it a success.

However, I hit a bump when trying to apply this same process to chrome tanned leather. For one, it's way more flexible than veg tan and I had a rough time trying to keep everything in place when using the burnisher.

So far, I've had to settle for a matte looking finish when using this type of leather. Are there any tips anyone could share for burnishing chrome tanned leather?

Thanks in advance!!

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you will literally pull your hair out if you try to burnish chrome tanned leather. Chrome tanned does not absorb water so you will be better off using an edge paint or some other form of finish.

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4 hours ago, Halitech said:

you will literally pull your hair out if you try to burnish chrome tanned leather. Chrome tanned does not absorb water so you will be better off using an edge paint or some other form of finish.

ah, the dreaded answer... so, sanding, and burning to a matte finish is the best I can aspire with chrome?

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31 minutes ago, EfrainBG said:

ah, the dreaded answer... so, sanding, and burning to a matte finish is the best I can aspire with chrome?

pretty much unless you want to invest in a electric edge burnishing machine and burn the edges

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If you do a layer of edge paint, then sand, burnish, sand again, then apply a final coat of edge paint, the coats will adhere to each other, and the final coat can look pretty good. I'd begun to think that edge paint was evil, then realized that it was just a solution to a different problem, and have started using it again. Remember...there is no "right way", there is only "different right ways".

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On 7/23/2009 at 5:41 PM, hidepounder said:

Hello everybody,

I receive quite a few PM's and emails requesting information on edges, finger cutting, tooling patterns and various other topics. Questions regarding some of these topics come up on a fairly regular basis, so I thought I would put something together that members could easily refer to. This article describes the way I finish edges and Johanna has posted it in the "Tips & Tricks" section on the main page. I hope that some of you will find it helpful.

Bob

SAVING THIS ;)

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Hey! Thanks so much for this tutorial. I'm trying to figure out how to finish the edges on my belts - edge kote LOOKS the best but I know it wont last long on the tongue of my belts - lots of action and bending happening there. I want to do the dying method here, but don't know how to flatten out the issue with my edges - I use an upholstery leather as my interior liner, and I while I can get the main piece of sole bend nice and smooth, theres always separation between the belt and the liner. 


Anyone have any ideas as to what I could do? Thanks so much! 

belt.jpg

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About edge kote (fiebings, to be more accurate): Why was I told, that edge kote looks completely amateur? I'm having difficulties with finishing edges only with dye and gum trag, as the edge isn't looking great.

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My edge kote looks fine. If you don't smooth the edge first, and if you don't lightly sand or buff the edge kote with a piece of canvas or similar, it might look amateur, but done correctly, it looks just fine. You should be able to get great edges with your dye and gum trag, also. It may take more than one attempt at it, but a very light sanding between applications should help. It doesn't hurt to put some beeswax on it either.

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@alpha2

Thank You for your great comment, it really helps me a lot. I'm not new, but still at the very beggining in the leatherwork, because I don't do as much as I'd want to.

I've used gum trag on quite a few leather edges (mostly leather belts), but I always came to the that kind of finish, where it looks like it's cracked, you could se cracks all over. I thought it was bad gum trag (I got it from China for few $), but someone told me it doesn't matter, what trag you're using.

That's why I'm confused now.

 

And what color it should be? Same as leather is dyed or some sort of a contrast should be applied? I use black, brown and red dyes so far.

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I've never used gum trag. If I'm doing a black belt or collar, I'll use black, if it's a tan to brown item, I'll use brown. A contrasting darker edge looks good some items. Natural is a great color itself sometimes for a lighter item. 

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So you recommend to buy natural, black and brown color? (I only work with these colors for now, but I'm into bordeux red also, but I really don't intend to use red dye for edges).

I got few more questions about (fiebings) edge kote:

 

How long can bottle be opened? Does it last a year or so?

How long does last one 4 oz. (118ml) bottle?
 

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When I say natural, I mean no dye, no edge coat. Just bevel, burnish, sand lightly, burnish again. 

A bottle will last quite a long time, unless you're doing serious production. You don't use that much at a time, and you will split it up between whatever colors you have.

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Burnish? With wooden burnished and no fluid at al?

 

No, not at all. I just wanted to know, if it vapors or becomes useless after time, if it's opened bottle.

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I haven't had a problem with edge coat drying out. 

I burnish with the wood burnisher and water most of the time, then rub some beeswax on the edges and burnish again. I just acquired a lathe motor and am in the process of making some burnishing wheels, so we'll see if that speeds up the process a bit. It is not absolutely needed, though.

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I do t know if this is the right place to post this, but here it goes. I have recently finished a beautiful tote bag for my wife out of rustic chromexcel horween 3/4 oz leather. Very soft, very supple. I am having a difficult time getting the edges on the handles to not bleed the dye I treated it with. I started with sanding with 220, then treated with feibings saddle soap. Then sanded another time with 420 grit. Then I treated with black spirit dye. After letting it dry, I sanded again with 420, and again spread black spirit dye. Then I treated with beeswax. Now, I rub it on any towel, and Black comes off every time!! It almost ruined one of my wife’s brand new blouses. I am hoping for some input here on how to get the dye to last and not come off with contact. I have even tried gum trag over it, as well as tan kote. Any ideas?

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Anything dyed needs a day or two to dry thoroughly, then buffed relentlessly until no more dye comes off on the cloth. Then, buff some more, and only when the cloth is clean after buffing, apply a sealer like tan kote. Before use, check again with a clean cloth to be sure it doesn't bleed. It's a lot of buffing. 

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1 hour ago, alpha2 said:

Anything dyed needs a day or two to dry thoroughly, then buffed relentlessly until no more dye comes off on the cloth. Then, buff some more, and only when the cloth is clean after buffing, apply a sealer like tan kote. Before use, check again with a clean cloth to be sure it doesn't bleed. It's a lot of buffing. 

Ok. Got it. Thanks. 

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Hi, Bob,

Back a couple of pages you mention that Bear Man makes an edge burnishing attachment for a dremel. I do have a dremel, and would like to be able to use it, but Bear Man hasn' been here since 2015. Can you help me find an attachment?

 

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16 minutes ago, Sheilajeanne said:

Hi, Bob,

Back a couple of pages you mention that Bear Man makes an edge burnishing attachment for a dremel. I do have a dremel, and would like to be able to use it, but Bear Man hasn' been here since 2015. Can you help me find an attachment?

 

Since you are in Canada, check out Epic Leather Arts

https://www.etsy.com/ca/listing/590090935/leather-edge-burnisher-leather-burnisher?ref=shop_home_feat_1

Edited by Halitech
forgot link

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Wow, that was a quick response! Thank you, Halitech!

What would us noobs ever do without this site!? :lol:

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just happened to see the email notification come in and I was talking to the owner the other night about them and still had the link open :)

I'm still learning as well :)

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thanks so much!

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