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Morning all,

My first attempt at boiling and hardening leather. I did this about a year ago (it takes me a while to post) and it is still rock solid.

I initially didn't think it would be strong enough so I have a thong from the back to the front (hence the punched hole). But it never needed it.

This was a piece of "un-toolable" leather off the side of a scrap hide from the local tannery. All different thicknesses and in really bad nick. I just gave a a scrub with some soapy water to get the factory grime off it, dipped it in boiling water, formed it and dried it in the oven with the door open. Then antiqued it in mahogany.

This was done before I knew how to finish edges etc. But I still love it.

Cheers and God bless,

Alex

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Alex,

Thank you so much for posting this. I have never heard of this method of working with leather. I'm very intrigues now. Apparently there's not much shrinking to speak of as it dries correct? How hot is the oven in the "baking" process? Have you ever tried to tool the leather first? Thanks in advance for your insight.

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The shrinkage was not really noticeable but some say it can be up to 30% which is a lot. i didn't find that though. I think it was also because it is just a sheet of leather with no real proportions. eg. if you made an arm guard, it might not fit.

I set the oven to its lowest setting of 70degrees celcius. and it took about two hours to dry. Next one I am going to try suntanning at midday to try and get the same effect.

I did make one that I tooled and it was ok. That was back before i really knew what tooling should look like and I can't really remember. your tooling definitely shallows out a lot.

cheers

Alex.

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Looks good. I once decided to do a boiled leather mug. I went to dip the mug and dropped it by mistake into the now boiling water. I know have a leather teacup that you could chop wood with. I could readily imagine boiled leather being able to turn a sword without much difficulty. Shrinkage was probably 50 percent and the leather thickness increased X 3 or so.

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