thesergeant

Has Anyone Built Their Own Industrial Sewing Tables? --Can You Critique My Idea?

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I have a problem with builing a table for my Durkopp 241. The cut out for the belt should actually remove the corner support (shown in the manual). Infact it seems that it is only supported at the two front corners by two corner brackets. The rest of the weight must be taken by the two hinges at the back. That is my guess.

Anyway, I don't like having such limitted support ad would rather spread the weight out. What do you think about me making a 1/4" lip aroun the edges and gluing a rubber gasket on to reduce vibration and to hide any issue with not cutting flat.

Maybe I should upload a drawing

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I remember encountering *somewhere* that the table cut-outs for German machines is somewhat different than those for the Japanese and American machines. I do not have an German industrial here to try in my tables, however. This may have been in reference to certain "garment" class machines, but its something to verify.

-DC

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it depends - older Pfaff 145 f.i. have the same size as the 111 type machines but the more modern ones (Adler, Pfaff, Durkopp...) have a longer base because of having the option to set it up as 1 and 2 needle machine.

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Inspired by you guys, I decided to built a table for my new acquisition, a SINGER 168W 101.
To take advantage of the price + shipping I decided that I didn't need the table/legs/motor.
But the person didn't tell me the HINGES are far from the ordinary ones!
Now they want to charge me $200 for table + S&H and 20 BUCKS FOR EACH HINGE!!!!
Not going to say who is the place but it's in Florida ... good hint hun?

Any of you know where could I get this specific hinge?
(Trying to attach an image of a CONSEW 329R-1's back that looks exactly what I need ...)
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTIwMFgxNjAw/z/-C8AAOSwhh5Tn0Ub/$_57.JPG



Edited by BodegaBrasil

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Constabulary ... with all respect, but I LOVE YOU!
Thank you VERY VERY VERY VERY MUCH!

Owe you one!

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I drink beer or redwine.... ;)

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No sweat !!!

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Hey guys, so I was hoping to get some input on these table legs before I commit and solder everything together. Do you think I need a cross brace connecting the back two vertical legs?

My concern is side to side rocking. I know I should have used flanges to mount the individual legs to the table top but they're absurdly expensive. Instead I'm going to use pipe straps on the corners of the 90* elbows and then drill out and put in two or three rivets connecting the pipe, elbow and straps together.

These legs are for my Singer 114w103 vintage chainstitch embroidery machine. If they work out I'll be remaking all the legs and tops for all of our machines to match (per the bosses orders aka wife) The top will be a 1-3/8" walnut butcher block table top with a 50# industrial machine and 14# motor.

Think I'm safe as is or should I add a cross brace along the back? Thanks guys!

IMG_0876.JPG

Edited by thesergeant

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It looks great but I'm concerned about the load bearing ability of that design. I'm thinking you'll need a cross brace at the very least, better yet two - and even then you may be pushing it. As it is, any sideways motion of the heavy top is going to get amplified into a VERY large twisting motion at the bottom center T-joints. Don't underestimate the power of levers and you have a formidable lever that has a 30" vertical lever twisting a pipe (joint) that is perhaps an inch thick, giving you a roughly 30x torque multiplier - it may very well twist the pipe itself if you bump into it hard enough with that much weight on top. Adding a few T connector vertically will improve the situation a great deal.

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I think it's GORGEOUS but ... If it's "pure" copper, you have to have something to avoid ...

1) the green oxidation touch any of your projects. So, even this "patina" is gorgeous as art by itself, the dust (or "paste" in case get in contact with water) can damage or even destroy some finishing of a leather / fabric.

2) it's a much more "folding" metal than iron / steel, so, depending the weight you put in one side or other, or bangs, or whatever will ending creating problems in the future.

And YES, IMHO, if all tables have the back (and bottom) brace(s), it's for a reason.
I suggest for you don't discover the worse way, is already put one before finish it.

Hope it can help.

BB

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Japanese cut out table.

This machine came with regular Singer flatbed table, and that will not work for a cylinder bed. These old cast iron stands are very sturdy, I just cut off one of the table tabs and made a new table top. The top are made of two 3/4" (= 1 1/2") pine "hobby plates" glued together. I have seen the Japanese used this style of tables on their machine. Three coats of white oil paint on the top and Hamerite on the stand. Functional and simple solution of what I had on hand. If the table had "Adler" on it, I would have used a little gold paint on the letters too :)

Anyway, the table became very stable and the white color saves lighting. Just to make it simple.

Tor

post-10237-0-52828000-1427156226_thumb.j

Edited by Trox

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Nicely done Tor! Interesting variation on the more common U-shaped table tops. The photo reminds me of scenes from "Dexter" (a TV series where the walls often get covered in plastic to contain blood spatter instead of paint). This solutions certainly looks like it won't fold flat when it gets bumped. Now you got me contemplating using an old cast iron base for my Pfaff 335 table. Thanks for posting this project!

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Thanks Uwe, I assure you that the plastic is the only resemblance between Dexter and myself, our hobbies are quite different :) This machine is going to be "bumped" (moved) out of my house ready to sew and I know it will stand for it. Its sold. I was inspired by this man on youtube https://www.youtube.com/user/DANGUMAN I been watching his videos for quite some time, without understanding a word of what he says. Perhaps he is Korean and not Japanese, that does not matter. He has a lot of nice ideas and machines. The pictures are telling the story anyway.

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Japanese cut out table.

This machine came with regular Singer flatbed table, and that will not work for a cylinder bed. These old cast iron stands are very sturdy, I just cut off one of the table tabs and made a new table top. The top are made of two 3/4" (= 1 1/2") pine "hobby plates" glued together. I have seen the Japanese used this style of tables on their machine. Three coats of white oil paint on the top and Hamerite on the stand. Functional and simple solution of what I had on hand. If the table had "Adler" on it, I would have used a little gold paint on the letters too :)

Anyway, the table became very stable and the white color saves lighting. Just to make it simple.

Tor

Oh man - TROX - you really have cut this nice Singer stand? :bawling: I had a bunch of similary ones but really would like to have one or two with SINGER logos like yours. These old cast iron stands are great. I´m using 1 + 1/2 for my machien setup.

BTW - you have sold the 105? May I ask how much you got for it?

The Danguman has realy cool accessories - have you noticed his patcher machine setup? Check his website:

http://www.danguman.com

Unfortunately my Japanese is ruted

Edited by Constabulary

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Thanks for the link to Danguman, really interesting ideas and machines.

.Did you happen to see this video from him?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7lyTRB0XHU

Looks like he set that cylinder arm machine up to sew/pulse one stitch at a time, or is that option available on some machines. I'm impressed..

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I think it could be something like the MC-SCR system that Sailrite sells - maybe.

Not sure if he (Danguman) is using an NPS but you can achieve this one stitch at a time sewing with a servo motor + speed reducer as well.

Edited by Constabulary

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Oh man - TROX - you really have cut this nice Singer stand? :bawling: I had a bunch of similary ones but really would like to have one or two with SINGER logos like yours. These old cast iron stands are great. I´m using 1 + 1/2 for my machien setup.

BTW - you have sold the 105? May I ask how much you got for it?

The Danguman has realy cool accessories - have you noticed his patcher machine setup? Check his website:

http://www.danguman.com

Unfortunately my Japanese is ruted

Hi, its a bit late for changing it for another now :) I am not sure which one you refer to? he has three stands on the top and some other kind of stands in the bottom of his page. My Japanese is not existent, if there are some other pages I would not know how to navigate to them.

The 105 is not out of the door yet, but I am selling it ttogetherwith a Pfaff 491 post/ Efka variostop machine. The 105 has been served, all bad screws/ parts changed. New DA hook that I paid 350 Euro for, a new 4 pole 650 Watt clutch motor and new speed reducer. The Pfaff has some new part too and been converted for single phase current (with a frequency converter). I will tell you the price after is picked up, I do not make any profit on this deal. :bawling:

However, I can not use all my machines and when somebody want to start with leather work here; I feel obligated to help out.

Tor

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Thanks for the link to Danguman, really interesting ideas and machines.

.Did you happen to see this video from him?

Looks like he set that cylinder arm machine up to sew/pulse one stitch at a time, or is that option available on some machines. I'm impressed..

I think this is a type of gear servo motor, it has no needle position. Dealers in the USA also sold something similar, they have a inbuilt gear speed reduction (I think the gears are made of plastic, thought). You will achieve this with a normal servo and reducer too, to echo Constabulary (why do everybody have these long difficult names, do you have anything shorter Constabulary? like Con or CY) :)

Tor

Edited by Trox

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The Danguman has realy cool accessories - have you noticed his patcher machine setup? Check his website:

http://www.danguman.com

That's similar to what I ended up doing with my 441 clone. I needed to fit it into a smaller space than the original table would allow so after cutting the original table in two and seeing the awful junk it was made of (pressure bonded scraps of ply with huge voids in it) I chucked it and used laminated MDF from an office desk.

Here's the cut edge of the original table showing the junk it's made of:

post-13283-0-14162900-1427242295_thumb.j

Here's what I originally did with the half width table:

post-13283-0-78122200-1427242360_thumb.j

That was a good size but I couldn't fit the Ho-Hsing motor on it so when I added that motor I replaced the table top with the formica covered MDF one. It's only an inch thick but it's plenty solid. I wouldn't use it for a flatbed top, it's way too thin, but with the 441 head sitting exactly over the post on the stand it's fine. The only movement in the whole system is the motor moving slightly on the rubber mounting grommets.

post-13283-0-51450100-1427242545_thumb.jpost-13283-0-10118200-1427242549_thumb.jpost-13283-0-60315600-1427242730_thumb.j

I also did things like add a holder for the oilcan. Eventually I'll add space to hang the various screwdrivers and hex keys needed to change the feet and make basic adjustments.

I put much bigger soft casters on the base. The ones that came with it were tiny and useless for carpet. Unfortunately they were plate mount not post mount so there are some ugly nuts on the top of the base, but I can live with that. I moved the foot pedals as well so that there's more separation between the foot lift pedal and the 'go' pedal.

The next plan is to make a better flat top for it. The ones that come with 441 clones are completely stupid in the way they attach to the table.

Edited by amuckart

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That's similar to what I ended up doing with my 441 clone. I needed to fit it into a smaller space than the original table would allow so after cutting the original table in two and seeing the awful junk it was made of (pressure bonded scraps of ply with huge voids in it) I chucked it and used laminated MDF from an office desk.

Here's the cut edge of the original table showing the junk it's made of:

attachicon.gif441-assembled2.jpg

Here's what I originally did with the half width table:

attachicon.gif441-assembled5.jpg

That was a good size but I couldn't fit the Ho-Hsing motor on it so when I added that motor I replaced the table top with the formica covered MDF one. It's only an inch thick but it's plenty solid. I wouldn't use it for a flatbed top, it's way too thin, but with the 441 head sitting exactly over the post on the stand it's fine. The only movement in the whole system is the motor moving slightly on the rubber mounting grommets.

attachicon.gifIMG_2222.JPGattachicon.gifIMG_2227.JPGattachicon.gifIMG_2227.JPG

I also did things like add a holder for the oilcan. Eventually I'll add space to hang the various screwdrivers and hex keys needed to change the feet and make basic adjustments.

I put much bigger soft casters on the base. The ones that came with it were tiny and useless for carpet. Unfortunately they were plate mount not post mount so there are some ugly nuts on the top of the base, but I can live with that. I moved the foot pedals as well so that there's more separation between the foot lift pedal and the 'go' pedal.

The next plan is to make a better flat top for it. The ones that come with 441 clones are completely stupid in the way they attach to the table.

Hi, that looks better, I see these A...wifes saves money where they do not think we will see it. Its a Cowboy machine direct from China?

Although my 441 stand is different from yours (French sold), my foot pedals sits to close together too. And I have a Efka, it takes a full rotation every time I touch the pedal. I turn the machine off before I remove the work piece, just to be sure not have a extra stitch in it. I have a project in rebuilding the foot lift to a air lift, it stalled because I got the wrong air cylinder (wrong stroke length). I like the knee lift system much better than the foot operated, then you do not have to move your foot (take your eyes away from what you working on) I think I will install a knee air switch (progressive one). An other thing I do not like with the 441 machines, is where the hand lever for the foot lift is placed. That space are used for much other items like drop down guide, sewing material etc. Should be on top front like on DA machines. I turned mine 180 deg. to fit a drop down guide, but the mechanism has no return spring and sometimes falls down when I use the foot pedal. A bad design!

What will you do to the flat table attachment? I wondered about buying one.... perhaps not?

Tor

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I've been meaning to post pictures of my latest sewing table project to contribute to this nice collection of table ideas. I finally got around to making a CNC template for carving out a tabletop for my Consew 225. The legs came from a local University surplus store for $20 (same legs as a previous poster, haha). The wood is marine plywood and ran $45 for this project. The ShopBot CNC router machine is at my local TechShop playground for adults. The two plywood plates are glued, then screwed together, for a total thickness of 1.4 inches - just the right amount of overkill.

post-56402-0-45374900-1434459091_thumb.jpost-56402-0-43203100-1434459098_thumb.jpost-56402-0-86333900-1434459104_thumb.jpost-56402-0-09560500-1434459113_thumb.jpost-56402-0-99516500-1434459119_thumb.jpost-56402-0-40302300-1434459128_thumb.jpost-56402-0-70624200-1434459134_thumb.jpost-56402-0-47317400-1434459144_thumb.jpost-56402-0-84877400-1434459151_thumb.j

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I bought a solid industrial sewing top for 65 bucks...then 2 used H legs for $50.....couple of screws and 15 minutes of cutting a hole....did I do well??????

No! 1st you have to beat yourself senseless with chains, kick the cat, pull your hair out, then run a triathlon. If your not doing things the hard way, your not doing it right!

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7-IMG_5535.JPG

This is a common problem when people add caster wheels to either a home made unit or when adding castors to standard K legs that come with sewing machines; the bottom front brace or bar becomes raised too high, where the treadle is now floating six inches off of the floor. Provisions should be made to lower the lower bar.

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Great table setup UWE!! Beyond jealous of that CNC.

Ya, Gregg, you're absolutely right about the treadle being raised with the addition of wheels. I was going to do this but never got around to it. Basically I was going to take take two pieces of walnut 1.25" x 1.25" x 3" (or whatever length is necessary to lower the treadle), then just drill out a .75" hole near the end of each piece for the treadle tube to go through. Drill and tap each 3/4" hole for a 'set screw" and then just bolt the spacer block to the frame and then then slide the tube in. Maybe I'll do that today and take some photos. I've grown accustomed to using it as is though.

Also, if you have a K-leg table you can add casters to it without adding any height to the treadle. A friend of mine has 50+ industrials and has been experimenting with different ways of putting these machines on casters. I think this is proabably the best and cleanest execution I've ever seen. He basically cuts away the the feet of the k-leg and then cuts channels into the legs for a piece of hardwood (he's also used steel). The piece of wood then slides cleanly into the channel and it is bolted in place. The treadle is then lowered with a spacer block. Then just lower the table top as necessary.

Screen%252520Shot%2525202015-06-16%25252

7-IMG_5535.JPG

This is a common problem when people add caster wheels to either a home made unit or when adding castors to standard K legs that come with sewing machines; the bottom front brace or bar becomes raised too high, where the treadle is now floating six inches off of the floor. Provisions should be made to lower the lower bar.

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